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Enterprise Innovation: From Creativity to Engineering

Michele Missikoff (Editor), Massimo Canducci (Editor), Neil Maiden (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-84821-851-2
322 pages
August 2015, Wiley-ISTE
Enterprise Innovation: From Creativity to Engineering (1848218516) cover image

Description

The World is changing and then also how enterprises carry out innovation needs to change. The book presents new methods and tools (from Creativity to Engineering), aimed at promoting and sustaining enterprise innovation and production improvement.

The book is primarily (but not exclusively) based on the new approaches, methods, frameworks, and tools conceived for enterprise innovation and production improvement, developed during the European Project BIVEE (Business Innovation for Virtual Enterprise Ecosystems.) Addressed topics range from Open Innovation in Virtual Enterprises to shared virtual spaces for collaborative creativity, to Innovation metrics and monitoring in the context of networked SMEs.

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Table of Contents

PREFACE . xiii

PART 1. BIVEE PROJECT FRAMING 1

CHAPTER 1. BUSINESS INNOVATION IN VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE ENVIRONMENTS 3
Massimo CANDUCCI

1.1. Introduction 3

1.2. Business innovation and virtual enterprises 5

1.3. Bibliography 6

CHAPTER 2. FROM CREATIVITY TO INNOVATION: THE IMPORTANCE OF DESIGN 7
Neil MAIDEN

2.1. Creativity and innovation 7

2.2. Creative problem-solving methods 8

2.3. Linking creativity and innovation through design 9

2.4. Service design processes 10

2.5. Integrating creativity support more effectively into service design methods 15

2.6 Conclusions 18

2.7. Bibliography 19

CHAPTER 3. THE BIVEE PROJECT: AN OVERVIEW OF METHODOLOGY AND TOOLS 21
Michele MISSIKOFF and Pierluigi ASSOGNA

3.1. Framing 21

3.2. The mission of BIVEE 24

3.3. Business ecosystems and virtual enterprises 26

3.4. Value production space 29

3.5. A participatory space for business innovation 34

3.6. BIVEE innovation waves 37

3.7. An integrated view of VPS and BIS 40

3.8. The macro-architecture of the BIVEE platform 42

3.9. Trial cases and impact 44

3.10. Bibliography 46

PART 2. STORYTELLING ON BIVEE EXPERIENCE 47

CHAPTER 4. A PROJECT OF COLLABORATIVE NETWORKED INNOVATION 49
Cristina CRISTALLI, Daniela ISIDORI and Isabella TERZONI

4.1. Introduction 49

4.2. Creativity wave 50

4.2.1. Proposed idea 50

4.3. Idea submission: Flumen 58

4.4. Innovation project: Flumen 60

4.4. Feasibility wave 64

4.5. Prototyping wave 66

4.6. Engineering wave 69

4.7. Conclusions 71

CHAPTER 5. A DAY OF NETWORKED PRODUCTION IMPROVEMENT 73
Fernando GIGANTE VALENCIA, Anil PACACI and Ali Anil SINACI

5.1. Resources involved 73

5.2. Setting the scene 75

5.3. Plan phase 76

5.3.1. Sales trend analysis 76

5.3.2. Order evaluation 77

5.3.3. Product definition 77

5.3.4. Network setup 79

5.4. Source phase 80

5.4.1. Stock analysis 80

5.4.2. Supplier selection 81

5.4.3. Purchase management 82

5.4.4. Component storage 83

5.5. Build phase 83

5.5.1. Component manufacturing 83

5.5.2. Finishing 84

5.5.3. Product assembly 85

5.5.4. Quality control 85

5.6. Delivery phase 86

5.6.1. Packing 86

5.6.2. Order preparation 86

5.6.3. Shipping 87

5.6.4. Delivery 87

5.7. Final considerations 88

5.8. Bibliography 89

PART 3. INNOVATING INNOVATION: BIVEE ACHIEVEMENTS 91

CHAPTER 6. THE BIVEE FRAMEWORK AND THE COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL (CICMM) 93
Benjamin KNOKE

6.1. The virtual enterprise modeling framework (VEMF) 94

6.1.1. VEMF: methodological background 95

6.1.2. VEMF: virtual enterprise setup 96

6.1.3. VEMF: modeling framework for production processes 99

6.2. Business innovation reference framework 101

6.2.1. BIRF: methodological background 101

6.2.2. BIRF: reference framework for innovation projects 103

6.3. Monitoring framework 104

6.4. Collaborative innovation capability maturity model (CICMM) 107

6.5. Conclusion and outlook 108

6.6. Bibliography 109

CHAPTER 7. THE BIVEE ENVIRONMENT: DESCRIPTION OF THE OVERALL SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE  111
Mauro ISAJA

7.1. Introduction 111

7.2. BIVEE environment reference architecture 113

7.3. The BIVEE platform 113

7.3.1. Production and innovation knowledge repository 114

7.3.2. Web portal 120

7.4. BIVEE application: the mission control room 122

7.5. BIVEE application: the virtual innovation factory 123

7.6. Conclusions 123

7.7. Bibliography 123

CHAPTER 8. THE MISSION CONTROL ROOM 125
Nesat EFENDIOGLU, Wilfrid UTZ and Robert WOITSCH

8.1. Introduction 125

8.2. Application scenarios 126

8.2.1. Virtual enterprise design 126

8.2.2. Virtual execution assistant 128

8.2.3. Virtual enterprise monitoring 129

8.2.4. Collecting feedback through the whiteboard 131

8.3. Concept 132

8.3.1. Identified requirements and issues 132

8.3.2. Approach and solution 133

8.4. Realization/technology 135

8.5. User experience 139

8.6. Conclusion 140

8.7. Bibliography 141

CHAPTER 9. THE VIRTUAL INNOVATION FACTORY 143
Francisco CALLE MORENO

9.1. Introduction 143

9.2. Methodological background 143

9.3. Current status 144

9.3.1. Baseline 144

9.3.2. Technology change 145

9.3.3. The selected framework 146

9.3.4. A more technical overview of the selected framework: Meteor 147

9.3.5. Components 150

9.3.6. The main VIF application 151

9.3.7. Fostering creativity 153

9.3.8. Collaborative tools 154

9.3.9. The innovation observatory 156

9.3.10. The semantic shared whiteboard 157

9.4. Connection with other BIVEE components 158

9.5. Conclusions and future work 159

9.6. Bibliography 159

CHAPTER 10. THE PRODUCTION AND INNOVATION KNOWLEDGE REPOSITORY 161
Francesco TAGLINO and Fabrizio SMITH

10.1. Introduction 161

10.1.1. BIVEE innovation framework 162

10.1.2. Analysis of requirements 163

10.2. Key enabling semantic technologies 164

10.3. Ontological framework 165

10.3.1. Knowledge resource ontologies 166

10.4. Domain ontology building methodology 170

10.5. Semantic annotation 174

10.5.1. Ontology-based lifting of value production space knowledge 174

10.5.2. Ontology-based lifting of business innovation space knowledge 179

10.5.3. Application scenarios and main functionalities for the BIS 180

10.6. Semantic enrichment of semantic media contents 181

10.6.1. Semantic search to foster idea creation 182

10.6.2. Semantic correlation of SMCs 183

10.6.3. User-driven content browsing 183

10.7. Implementation 184

10.7.1. PIKR architecture overview 185

10.8. Conclusions 186

10.9. Bibliography 186

CHAPTER 11. MONITORING INNOVATION AND PRODUCTION IMPROVEMENT 189
Claudia DIAMANTINI, Domenico POTENA and Emanuele STORTI

11.1. Introduction 189

11.2. Related work 191

11.3. Architecture of the performance monitoring 193

11.4. KPIOnto 194

11.4.1. Analysis of requirements and KPI characteristics 194

11.4.2. Ontology schema 195

11.5. Semantic services 198

11.5.1. Formula manipulation 199

11.5.2. Consistency check 199

11.6. Semantic data handler 201

11.6.1. Query management 201

11.6.2. Architecture of the semantic data handler 202

11.7. User applications 205

11.7.1. KPIOnto Editor 205

11.7.2. KPIExplorer 207

11.8. Conclusion 209

11.9. Bibliography 210

CHAPTER 12. RAW DATA CONNECTION SERVICES AND TOOLS 213
Mauro ISAJA

12.1. Introduction 213

12.2. Raw data management 214

12.2.1. Data storage 215

12.2.2. Public API 220

12.2.3. Front-end 221

12.3. Semantic annotation and ETL development environment 222

12.3.1. Meta-data synchronization 224

12.3.2. Data translation 226

12.3.3. ETL job building 229

12.3.4. ETL job deployment 232

12.4. Bibliography 232

PART 4. CONCRETE EXPERIENCE OF INNOVATION IN A KNOWLEDGE CENTRIC ECONOMY 233

CHAPTER 13. INNOVATION AND PRODUCTION IMPROVEMENT IN VIRTUAL ENTERPRISES: THE USER PERSPECTIVE 235
Anil PACACI, Ali Anil SINACI and Asuman DOGAC

13.1. Why validation 235

13.2. End-users 235

13.2.1. AIDIMA 236

13.2.2. Loccioni 237

13.3. Pilot validation cases 238

13.3.1. AS-IS and TO-BE application cases 239

13.3.2. Connection to user requirements 240

13.4. First monitoring campaign (FMC) 243

13.4.1. Methodology 243

13.4.2. Analysis and conclusion 245

13.5. Second Monitoring Campaign (SMC) 248

13.5.1. Methodology 248

13.5.2. Analysis and conclusion 251

13.6. Impact analysis of BIVEE 253

13.7. Bibliography 255

CHAPTER 14. A METHODOLOGY FOR THE SETUP OF A VIRTUAL INNOVATION FACTORY PLATFORM  257
Cristina CRISTALLI, Daniela ISIDORI and Isabella TERZONI

14.1. Introduction 257

14.2. Innovation knowledge flow, storage and monitoring with the BIVEE platform 259

14.3. Virtual innovation factory platform 260

14.4. KPI selection and BIVEE platform prototype 262

14.5. Conclusions 263

14.6. Bibliography 264

CHAPTER 15. THE AIDIMA EXPERIENCE 265
Fernando GIGANTE VALENCIA

15.1. Introduction 265

15.2. Validation scenarios 266

15.3. Monitoring campaigns 271

15.4. The BIVEE setup 276

15.4.1. Product definition 276

15.4.2. Definition of processes 278

15.4.3. KPI management 279

15.5. Encountered issues 280

15.5.1. Furniture production cycles 281

15.5.2. Data sharing 281

15.5.3. Low technology SMEs 282

15.5.4. Process modeling 282

15.6. Improvements in the BIVEE environment 283

15.7. BIVEE cultural improvement 284

15.7.1. Collaborative approach 285

15.7.2. Information sharing 285

15.7.3. Process management 286

15.7.4. Detection of problems and opportunities 287

15.7.5. KPIs management 288

15.8. Conclusions 288

15.9. Bibliography 289

CONCLUSIONS 291

Michele MISSIKOFF

LIST OF AUTHORS 295

INDEX 297

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