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Daily Knowledge Valuation in Organizations: Traceability and Capitalization

Nada Matta (Editor), Hassan Atifi (Editor), Guillaume Ducellier (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-84821-857-4
260 pages
April 2016, Wiley-ISTE
Daily Knowledge Valuation in Organizations: Traceability and Capitalization (1848218575) cover image

Description

One of the major challenges for modern organizations is the management of individual and collective knowledge, which is at the root of specific practices designed to optimize knowledge acquisition, maintenance and application. There are, however, still a disproportionately low number of studies focused on the structure and nature of knowledge.

This book tackles the subject of daily knowledge: the knowledge related to everyday tasks. How does this knowledge present itself in the mind? How do we acquire and preserve it?

To answer these questions, the authors explore a number of techniques which help to keep track of information produced in collaborative activity and extract knowledge by aggregating these traces.

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Table of Contents

Preface xi
Nada MATTA 1

Chapter 1 Daily Knowledge 1
Nada Matta

1.1. Knowledge 1

1.2. Daily knowledge 5

1.3. Individual versus collaborative knowledge 7

1.3.1. Difference in the nature of captured knowledge 7

1.3.2. Difference in the dimension to be considered 8

1.3.3. Difference in capturing of knowledge 9

1.4. Challenge to manage daily knowledge 10

1.5. Conclusions 15

1.6. Bibliography 16

Chapter 2 Traceability 21
Nada MATTA and Fatima BERRICHE

2.1. Traces 21

2.2. Profiling approaches 23

2.2.1. Experience-based reasoning 25

2.2.2. Example: profiling in crisis management 26

2.3. Traceability of information 28

2.4. Traceability of knowledge 30

2.5. Conclusions 32

2.6. Bibliography 33

Chapter 3 Traceability and Structuring of Decision-making 35
Nada MATTA and Guillaume DUCELLIER

3.1. Decision-making 35

3.2. Cooperative decision-making 37

3.2.1. Design rationale 38

3.2.2. Representation of the dynamics of problem-solving 41

3.3. Conflict management 45

3.3.1. Prevention methods 45

3.3.2. Argumentation methods 46

3.3.3. Negotiation methods 47

3.4. Conflict types 47

3.5. Traceability of design rationale 49

3.5.1. Memory meetings 49

3.5.2. Project memory building 55

3.6. Integrating traceability in PLM tools 57

3.6.1. Windchill and project management 59

3.6.2. The organizations of elements in Windchill 62

3.6.3. Project memory within Windchill 64

3.7. Conclusion 67

3.8. Bibliography 68

Chapter 4 Classifications and Aggregation of Traces 73
Xinghang DAI, Nada MATTA and Guillaume DUCELLIER

4.1. Classification 73

4.1.1. Heuristic classification 74

4.1.2. Knowledge discovery 76

4.1.3. Hierarchical classification 78

4.2. Cooperative knowledge aggregation 80

4.2.1. Cooperative knowledge ontology 81

4.2.2. Graphs representing relations between concepts in project memory 84

4.3. CKD classification algorithms 87

4.4. Conclusions 90

4.5. Bibliography 91

Chapter 5 Exapmple of Traceability and Classifications of Decision-making  95
Xinghang DAI, Nada MATTA, Guillaume DUCELLIER, Tatiana REYES

5.1. Example of software design projects 95

5.1.1. Problem-solving knowledge 96

5.1.2. Management knowledge 100

5.1.3. Example analysis 105

5.2. Example of PLM system design 106

5.2.1. Problem-solving knowledge 107

5.2.2. Management knowledge 111

5.2.3. Example analysis 114

5.3. Example of ecodesign projects 115

5.3.1. Problem-solving knowledge 116

5.3.2. Management knowledge 119

5.3.3. Example analysis 120

5.4. Conclusion 120

5.5. Bibliography 122

Chapter 6 Communication, CMC and Email: A Brief Survey 123
Hassan ATIFI

6.1. Introduction 123

6.2. What is communication? 124

6.2.1. Traditional view of communication 124

6.2.2. Interactional view of communication 125

6.3. The pragmatics of interactions 128

6.3.1. Ethnography of communication 129

6.3.2. Interaction analysis 130

6.4. Pragmatics and speech acts 131

6.4.1. J.L. Austin 131

6.4.2. J.R. Searle 132

6.5. Computer-mediated communication 133

6.5.1. CMC, interaction and emotion 134

6.5.2. CMC, culture and multilingualism 137

6.6. CMC, e-mail and knowledge management 140

6.6.1. CMC and e-mail 140

6.6.2. CMC and knowledge management 142

6.7. Conclusions 143

6.8. Bibliography 144

Chapter 7 Traceability of Communications in Software Design 153
François RAUSCHER, Hassan ATIFI and Nada MATTA

7.1. Introduction 153

7.2. Problem-solving 154

7.3. Software development process 155

7.4. Related works on e-mail analysis 155

7.5. Project knowledge extraction from e-mails 156

7.5.1. Classification of e-mails 157

7.5.2. Message analysis 158

7.6. Example 160

7.6.1. Example description 160

7.6.2. E-mail analysis 162

7.6.3. Message content analysis 167

7.7. Context-aware algorithm 169

7.8. Conclusion 172

7.9. Bibliography 174

Chapter 8 Traceability of Actions in Crisis Management  179
Mohamed SEDIRI, Nada MATTA and Sophie LORIETTE

8.1. Introduction 179

8.2. Crisis management 180

8.2.1. Explorations of the state of the art in crisis management help to identify three management styles 182

8.3. Decision-making in crisis situations 184

8.4. Decision-making support using experience feedback 187

8.4.1. Experience feedback: collection and modeling 188

8.5. Clever crisis management system (CCS) framework 193

8.5.1. CCS: a system of state/event 195

8.5.2. Situation organization in a database 197

8.5.3. Interaction between the system and actor 199

8.5.4. Implementation structure of situation base 201

8.5.5. The choice of the maps system 202

8.6. Traceability of the experience feedback 204

8.7. Human–machine interface of CCS 205

8.8. Example 208

8.9. Conclusion 210

8.10. Bibliography 211

Chapter 9 Traceability in Problem-solving Processes 215
Elisabeth KUNTZ, Eric REUBREZ, Laurent GENESTE, Juan Camilo ROMERO, Valentina LLAMAS and Aymeric DE VALROGER

9.1. Introduction 215

9.2. Problem-solving processes 216

9.2.1. Problem context description 217

9.2.2. Analysis 217

9.2.3. Proposal and evaluation of action plans 218

9.3. Traceability and reuse 219

9.4. ProWhy 224

9.4.1. ProWhy: problem-solving process support 225

9.4.2. ProWhy: reuse of past experiences 230

9.5. Conclusion 231

9.6. Bibliography 231

Conclusion  235
Nada MATTA

List of Authors 241

Index 243

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