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Technology and Practical Use of Strain Gages: With Particular Consideration of Stress Analysis Using Strain Gages

ISBN: 978-3-433-03138-4
512 pages
September 2017
Technology and Practical Use of Strain Gages: With Particular Consideration of Stress Analysis Using Strain Gages (343303138X) cover image

Description

This book is a profound compendium on strain gages and their application in materials science and all fields of engineering. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of strength and stress analysis using the technique of strain gages. A brief historical review about strain gage inventions is looking at the "who, when and how". The comprehensive bibliography leads to additional background information.
Particular consideration is given to the stress analysis in order to verify the mechanical properties and capacity of components with focus on stability and serviceability, optimization, and safety checks, as well as in order to foresee inspection and monitoring. The practice-oriented descriptions of the principles of the measurement, installation and experimental set-ups derives from the author`s own experiences in the field. Particular emphasis is laid on the correct planning and assessment of measurements, and on the interpretation of the results. Step-by-step guidance is given for many application examples, and comments help to avoid typical mistakes.
The book is an indispensable reference work for experts who need to analyze structures and have to plan measurements which lead to reliable results. The book is instructive for practitioners who must install reliable measurement circuits and judge the results. The book is also recommended for beginners to get familiar with the problems and to learn about the possibilities and the limits of the strain gage technique.
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Table of Contents

Historical Review
Fundamentals of strain-gage technology
Measurement principle and structure
Circuit principle
Basic equation of the bridge circuit
Temperature compensation
Limit of the bridge signal resolution
Examples of some elementary bridge circuits
Compensation method
Determination of mechanical stresses from
strains measured with strain gages
Initial considerations
Examples of measurement objects loaded longitudinally





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Author Information

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stefan Keil played an authoritative part in the development of modern experimental strain analysis. Stefan Keil was born in 1937. He studied mechanical engineering at RWTH Aachen, Germany. After graduation he researched on strength of materials and leaded fatigue tests on structural components of aircrafts with Hamburger Flugzeugbau GmbH. He then returned to the RWTH Aachen Institute of Material Science as assistant professor where he was active in research on material behavior under service loads. He dealt with strength calculations and methods of stress analysis using strain gages, i.e. in the elastoplastic deformation range. He received his doctorate in 1970 and was honored with the Borchers Award. From 1971 to 1996 he was employed with Hottinger Baldwin Messtechnik where he spezialized in the technique and application of strain gages. Here he was responsible for research projects dealing with the experimental assessment of load-bearing capacity and safety of structures. From 1996 to 1999 Stefan Keil has worked with the Institute of Experimental Statics in Bremen. In 1997 he was appointed associate lecturer and honorary professor in 2003 at the Technical University of Clausthal. For more than 20 years he was the editor of the journal ?Messtechnische Briefe? and in 1985 he founded the journal ?Reports in Applied Measurement? RAM. He is member of the GESA executive board and in 2010 he was awarded the VDI honorary plaque. He has authored and co-authored more than 60 journal papers, a large number of conference papers, and has been a working member of several technical committees and working groups. Stefan Keil is a sought-after expert advisor in the field of experimental mechanics.
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