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Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering, 2 Volume Set

Joel M. Haight (Editor)
ISBN: 978-3-527-32995-3
1154 pages
April 2013
Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering, 2 Volume Set (3527329951) cover image

Loss prevention engineering describes all activities intended to help organizations in any industry to prevent loss, whether it be through injury, fire, explosion, toxic release, natural disaster, terrorism or other security threats. Compared to process safety, which only focusses on preventing loss in the process industry, this is a much broader field.

Here is the only one-stop source for loss prevention principles, policies, practices, programs and methodology presented from an engineering vantage point. As such, this handbook discusses the engineering needs for manufacturing, construction, mining, defense, health care, transportation and quantification, covering the topics to a depth that allows for their functional use while providing additional references should more information be required. The reference nature of the book allows any engineers or other professionals in charge of safety concerns to find the information needed to complete their analysis, project, process, or design.

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Contents to Volume 1

Preface XVII

List of Contributors XIX

Part I Engineering Management for Loss Prevention Engineering 1

1 Management Systems – Loss Prevention Engineering Programs and Policy 3
Shakirudeen Shakioye

1.1 Introduction – Understanding the Need for Management Systems 3

1.2 Management Systems – Definitions 6

1.3 Loss Prevention Engineering – Considerations 7

1.4 Management Systems – Loss Prevention Engineering 9

Appendix 1.A: BCN – NSHE Sample Drug and Alcohol Policy 24

Appendix 1.B: Behavior-Based Safety Supporting Tool 26

Appendix 1.C: Sample Internal Simple Inspection Checklist 27

References 28

2 Resource Allocation and Effectiveness Measures for Loss Prevention 31
Samuel A. Oyewole

2.1 Introduction 31

2.2 What Is Loss Prevention/Safety and Health Intervention? 32

2.3 Historical Perspective of Resource Allocation for Loss Prevention 33

2.4 Loss Prevention/Safety and Health Intervention Effectiveness Evaluation 36

2.5 Importance of Multiple Factors in Loss Prevention 37

2.6 Research Methodology in Resource Allocation for Loss Prevention 38

2.7 Experimental Method 39

2.8 Analysis and Results 39

2.9 Conclusion 48

References 50

3 Engineering Systems and Engineering Economics of Loss Prevention 53
Joel M. Haight

3.1 Introduction 53

3.2 Cost of Injuries 55

3.3 Return on Investment Versus Cost Savings Versus Productivity Savings 56

3.4 Engineering Economics 57

3.5 Engineering Economic Decision-Making 59

3.6 Net Present Value Comparison (Equipment Replacement) 59

3.7 Payback Period Comparison 65

3.8 Financial Considerations of a Loss Prevention Engineering Project 66

3.9 Conclusion 69

References 69

4 Safety Management and Culture 71
Brian W. Tink and Brian A. Tink

4.1 What Is Organizational Culture? 71

4.2 How Does Culture Form? 74

4.3 Why Is It Good Business to Improve Your Company’s Culture? 77

4.4 Measuring Culture 79

4.5 How to Bring About Changes in Culture 82

References 86

5 Leadership and Loss Prevention Engineering: Creating Conditions to Get Beyond Compliance to High Performance 89
Michele Lindsay

5.1 Introduction 89

5.2 Management Theories 92

5.3 Moving Beyond Mechanistic Management 99

5.4 Humanistic Organizations 99

5.5 Case Studies of Humanistic Management 107

References 110

Part II Design and Analysis of Protective Systems – General Loss Prevention Engineering 113

6 General Loss Prevention Engineering Programs – Including Fire Loss Control 115
Jeffery Robinson

6.1 Background 115

6.2 Introduction 116

6.3 Elements of a Fire Loss Control Program 116

6.4 Fire Prevention Controls 118

Appendix A. Loss Prevention Survey 135

References 140

7 Permit-to-Work Systems 141
John W. Mroszczyk

7.1 Introduction 141

7.2 The Permit-to-Work Process 141

7.3 Regulations and Standards 145

7.4 Hot Work 145

7.5 Confined Space 149

7.6 Live Line Electrical Work 151

References 156

Recommended Reading 156

8 Excavation and Trenching 159
Michael W. Hayslip

8.1 Introduction 159

8.2 Hazard Identification and Federal OSHA Regulation 162

8.3 Soil Types 166

8.4 Basic Soil Mechanics Theory 172

8.5 Testing and Soil Classification Systems 176

8.6 Protective Systems 185

Glossary (Taken in Part from Standard Handbook for Civil Engineers (Ricketts, Loftin, and Merritt, 2003) and OSHA 29 CFR 1926 (OSHA, 2012b)) 192

References 199

9 Machine Safeguarding 201
John W. Mroszczyk

9.1 Introduction 201

9.2 Regulations and Standards 202

9.3 Machine Motion Hazards 203

9.4 Human Factor Aspects of Machine Guarding 206

9.5 Machine Safeguarding Methodology 207

9.6 Basic Machine Guarding Principles 212

9.7 Types of Machine Safeguarding 213

9.8 Machine Controls 220

9.9 Responsibilities of the Machine Builder 223

9.10 Mechanical Power Presses 224

9.11 Power Press Brakes 224

9.12 Conveyors 225

9.13 Roll-Forming and Roll-Bending Machines 225

9.14 Shearing Machines 225

9.15 Laser Machining 226

9.16 Robots 227

9.17 Conclusion 228

References 228

Further Reading 229

10 Boilers and Pressure Vessels: a Brief Look at General Safeguards 231
Patrick Fortune

10.1 Water 231

10.2 Safeguards 234

10.3 Codes, Regulations, and Training 235

10.4 Types of Boilers 238

10.5 Operating Considerations 240

10.6 Boiler Feed Water 244

10.7 Chemical Handling 247

10.8 Steam 251

10.9 Special Considerations for Pressure Vessels 255

10.10 Fire Detection and Control 256

10.11 Incident Investigation 257

10.12 Closing Thoughts 258

References 259

11 Welding and Cutting 261
Jeffery S. Haight

11.1 Introduction 261

11.2 Basic Equipment for Welding Comfortably and Safely 264

11.3 The Welding Process 267

11.4 Cutting 272

11.5 Conclusion 276

References 276

12 Power Tools 277
Warren K. Brown

12.1 Introduction 277

12.2 Guards 281

12.3 Safety Switches 282

12.4 Electric Tools 282

12.5 Powered Abrasive Wheel Tools 283

12.6 Liquid Fuel Tools 283

12.7 Pneumatic Tools 284

12.8 Hydraulic Power Tools 284

12.9 Conclusion 301

References 301

13 Personal Protective Equipment 303
Christopher M. Stroz

13.1 Introduction 303

13.2 General Selection 304

13.3 Types 304

13.4 Conclusion 323

References 323

14 Powered Industrial Trucks 327
Thaddeus M. Pajak and Mary Hoerster

14.1 Introduction 327

14.2 Lift Truck Accident Prevention: An Integrated Approach 329

14.3 Fork Truck Safety Observations 330

14.4 Making Safety Observations 331

14.5 Loading Dock Safety 335

14.6 Whole Body Vibration 338

14.7 Administrative Controls for Lift Truck Operator Strains and Sprain Prevention 340

14.8 Rack and Overhead Storage and Industrial Lift Truck Operations 341

14.9 Carbon Monoxide and Dilution Ventilation 344

14.10 MVR Program and Physical Requirements 345

14.11 Case Studies 346

14.12 Using Acceptable Safety Tolerances in Defining Preventive Maintenance 348

14.13 Industrial Lift Truck Accident Costs 349

14.14 Conclusions and Establishing Safe Behavior Observation Management Programs 350

References 352

Part III Ergonomics and Human Factors Engineering 355

15 Biomechanics and Physical Ergonomics 357
Kyung-Sun Lee and Myung-Chul Jung

15.1 Introduction 357

15.2 Biomechanics 357

15.3 Applications of Biomechanics in Ergonomics 366

15.4 Conclusion 369

References 370

16 Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering 373
Anand Tharanathan and Ling Rothrock

16.1 Introduction 373

16.2 Models of Human Cognition 374

16.3 Applications to Process Engineering and Surface Transportation 379

16.4 Conclusions 388

References 389

17 Virtual Working Environment 393
Teodor Winkler, Jaroslaw Tokarczyk, and Dariusz Michalak

17.1 Methodological Assumptions 393

17.2 Elements of the Virtual Working Environment Structure 394

17.3 Engineering Approach to Loss Prevention Within the Life-Cycle of Technical Means 398

17.4 Methods and Tools Supporting the Creation of Elements of a Virtual Working Environment 400

17.5 Human Body Modeling 402

17.6 Anthropomorphic Test Dummies 403

17.7 Multi-Body Models of ATDs 406

17.8 Multi-Body Human Models 408

17.9 Finite Element Models of ATDs 409

17.10 Finite Element Human Models 409

17.11 Digital Human Models 410

17.12 Modeling of Phenomena 414

17.13 Conclusion 418

References 418

18 Shaping of Working Conditions Using ICT Technology 423
Dariusz Michalak, Magdalena Rozmus, and Teodor Winkler

18.1 Working Environment 423

18.2 Information and Communication Technologies 425

18.3 Computer-Aided Shaping of Working Conditions 426

18.4 Shaping of Work Organization Using ICT 436

18.5 Conclusion 442

References 443

19 Safety-Oriented Virtual Prototyping of Mining Mechanical Systems 445
Jaroslaw Tokarczyk, Marek Dudek, and Bogdan Gicala

19.1 Introduction 445

19.2 Introduction to Polish Underground Coal Mine Working Conditions 446

19.3 Introduction to Technical Hazards 448

19.4 Graphical Methods of Technical Hazards Assessment in Underground Mechanical Systems 449

19.5 Virtual Prototyping of FOPS 454

19.6 Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analyses in Virtual Prototyping of Mining Machines 457

19.7 Conclusion 460

References 460

Contents to Volume 2

List of Contributors XXIII

Part IV Process Safety Management and System Safety Engineering 463

20 Process Safety Regulations Around the World 465
Remigio Agraz-Boeneker

21 Analytical Methods in Process Safety Management and System Safety Engineering – Process Hazard Analysis 501
Paul Baybutt

22 Safety Instrumented Systems 555
Geoffrey S. Barnard

23 Analytical Methods in Process Safety Management and System Safety Engineering – Layers of Protection Analysis 593
Paul Baybutt

24 Chemical Reaction Safety 637
John C. Wincek

25 Application of Systems Engineering to Safety and Risk Management: a Human–Systems Integration Perspective 681
Tareq Ahram and Waldemar Karwowski

26 Management of Change 701
Tracey Zarn and Aaron Hade

27 The Importance of Fostering a Strong Industrial Safety Culture and Change Management 725
Jeffery M. Kramer

28 Contractor Safety Management 747
Michael Farris

29 Emergency Preparedness and Response 773
Leo J. DeBobes

30 Security and Terrorism 785
Mohammed Nasir Mohammed Ismail

Part V Occupational Health and Environmental Engineering 795

31 Control of Chemical Hazards 797
Marjory E. Anderson

32 Control of Physical Hazards 821
Marjory E. Anderson

33 Control of Air Pollution 855
Tyler Nguyen

34 Hazardous Waste Management and Engineering 897
Darryl C. Hill

Part VI Incident Investigation and Root Cause Analysis Methodology and Management 913

35 How to Conduct Effective Incident Investigations 915
Kevin McManus

36 Incident Investigations – Lessons Learned – Development and Communications 937
David Janney

37 Managing Records, Investigation and Recommendation Management and Closure 947
David Janney

Part VII Fire Protection Engineering 959

38 Fire Dynamics 961
Christopher C. Venn

39 Fire Prevention and Protection 999
Craig Arthur Brown

40 The Science and Engineering of Explosions 1041
David G. Lilley

Index 1083

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Joel M. Haight, Ph.D., P.E., is the Branch Chief of the Human Factors Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at their Pittsburgh Office of Mine Safety and Health Research. For the nearly 10 years prior to this appointment, Dr. Haight served as an Associate Professor of Energy and Mineral Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. He has a Ph.D. and Master´s degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering both from Auburn University. Dr. Haight worked as a manager and an environmental and safety engineer for the Chevron Corporation for 18 years, prior to joining the faculty at Penn State. He has nearly 40 peer-reviewed publications and is the editor-in-chief of the American Society of Safety Engineer´s -The Safety Professionals Handbook. He is a professional member of American Society of Safety Engineers, American Industrial Hygiene Association and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.
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April 15, 2013
Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering, 2 Volume Set

Wiley is pleased to announce the publication of the only one-stop source for loss prevention principles, policies, practices, programs and methodology.  The Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering presents the engineering needs for manufacturing, construction, mining, defence, health care, transportation and quantification; covering the topics to a depth that allows for their functional use while providing additional references should more information be required. One of its major advantages is that The Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering deals not only with engineering aspects but how these relate to the economics of loss prevention, corporate culture, leadership and business practice and project planning.

 

The reference nature of the Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineeringallows engineers or other professionals in charge of safety concerns to find the information needed to complete their analysis, project, process, or design.  

 

The 2 volume set cover the topics to a depth that will allow functional use while providing additional references in case more information in needed making it a must-have for every safety engineer and safety professional.

 

To speak to the author or for sample chapters, online access or a review copy of the Handbook of Loss Prevention Engineering please contact:  Michelle Martella at Wiley
Tel: +1 201-748-6145/email: mmartella@wiley.com

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