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Nanomachines: Fundamentals and Applications

ISBN: 978-3-527-33120-8
200 pages
September 2013
Nanomachines: Fundamentals and Applications (3527331204) cover image

Description

Nanomachines represent one of the most fascinating topics in of nanotechnology. These tiny devices provide diverse opportunities towards a wide range of important applications, ranging from targeted delivery of drug payloads to environmental remediation. This book addresses comprehensively the latest developments and discoveries in the field of nano- and microscale machines. It covers the evolution of nanomachines in general from a historical perspective, the fundamental challenges for motion at the nanoscale, different categories of biological and synthetic nano/microscale motors based on different propulsion mechanisms, ways for controlling the movement directionality
and regulated speed, followed by detailed of major areas for which nanomachines has the potential to make a transformational impact. It ends with a futuristic look at nano/microscale machines and into their impact on the society.

Key Features:

* The only nanomachine introductory textbook currently available.
* Written with college graduate level in mind to appeal to a broad interdisciplinary audience.
* Covers the fundamental challenges for nanoscale motion.
* Covers the latest advances in the design and operaton of a wide range of small-scale machines.
* Covers diverse biomedical, environmental and technological applications of nanomachines.
* Written in review format with cited articles to cover latest research and developments.
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Table of Contents

PREFACE

FUNDAMENTALS ? SMALL-SCALE PROPULSION
Introduction
Nanomachines History
Challenges to Nanoscale Propulsion
Low Reynolds Number Hydrodynamics

MOTION OF NATURAL NANOSWIMMERS
Introduction
Chemically Powered Motor Proteins
Rotary Biomotors
Swimming Microorganisms

MOLECULAR MACHINES
Stimuli-Responsive Rotaxane, Pseudorotaxane, and Catenane Nanomachines
Molecular Rotary Motors
Light-Driven Molecular Machines based on cis?trans Photoisomerization
Nanocars
DNA Nanomachines

SELF-PROPELLING CHEMICALLY POWERED DEVICES
Self-Propelling Catalytic Nanowires
Catalytic Tubular Microengines
Catalytic Janus Microparticles: Spherical Motors
Controlled Motion of Chemically Powered Nano/Microscale Motors
Alternative Fuels for Chemically Powered Micro/Nanoscale Motors
Collective Behavior: Toward Swarming and Chemotaxis
Biocatalytic Propulsion
Motion Based on Asymmetric Release of Chemicals
Polymerization-Induced Motion

EXTERNALLY POWERED NANOMOTORS ? FUEL-FREE NANOSWIMMERS
Magnetically Driven Nanomotors
Electrically Driven Nanomotors
Ultrasound-Actuated Micromotors
Light-Driven Micromotors
Hybrid Nanomotors

APPLICATIONS OF NANO/MICROSCALE MOTORS
Cargo Towing: Toward Drug Delivery
Biosensing and Target Isolation
Active Nanoscale Transport by Synthetic Motors in Microchip Devices
Nanomotor-based Surface Patterning and Self-Assembly
Use of Micro/Nanoscale Motors for Environmental Monitoring and Remediation

CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS
Current Status and Future Opportunities
Future Challenges
Concluding Remarks

INDEX
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Author Information

Joseph Wang is Professor in Department of Nanoengineering at the University of California, San Diego. He received his PhD from the Israel Institute of Technology in 1978. He held a Regents Professorship and a Manasse Chair at New Mexico State University and served as the Director of Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors of the Arizona State University. Joseph Wang has published more than 800 papers and ten books and holds twelve patents. He received two ACS National Awards and three honorary professorships from Spain, Argentina and Slovenia. He became the most cited electrochemist in the world and was listed fourth on the ISI list of "Most Cited Researchers in Chemistry" in the decade 1996-2006. Joseph Wang is the Editor-in-Chief of "Electroanalysis" (Wiley). His scientific interests are concentrated in the areas of nanomachines, bioelectronics, bionanotechnology and electroanalytical chemistry.
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