Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Bio- and Bioinspired Nanomaterials

ISBN: 978-3-527-33581-7
488 pages
December 2014
Bio- and Bioinspired Nanomaterials (3527335811) cover image

Description

A comprehensive overview of nanomaterials that are inspired by or targeted at biology, including some of the latest breakthrough research. Throughout, valuable contributions from top-level scientists illustrate how bionanomaterials could lead to novel devices or structures with unique properties.
The first and second part cover the most relevant synthetic and bioinspired nanomaterials, including surfaces with extreme wettability properties, functional materials with improved adhesion or structural and functional systems based on the complex and hierarchical organization of natural composites. These lessons from nature are explored in the last section where bioinspired materials are proposed for biomedical applications, showing their potential for future applications in drug delivery, theragnosis, and regenerative medicine.
A navigational guide aimed at advanced and specialist readers, while equally relevant for readers in research, academia or private companies focused on high added-value contributions. Young researchers will also find this an indispensable guide in choosing or continuing to work in this stimulating area, which involves a wide range of disciplines, including chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering, biology, and medicine.
See More

Table of Contents

List of Contributors XIII

Foreword XXIII

Preface XXV

Part I Bionanomaterials 1

1 Synthesis of Colloidal Gold and Silver Nanoparticles and their Properties 3
Christian Pfeiffer, Wolfgang J. Parak, and Jose Maria Montenegro

1.1 Introduction 3

1.2 Physical and Chemical Properties of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles 6

1.2.1 Optical Properties of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles 7

1.2.2 Electronic Properties of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles 8

1.3 Synthesis of Gold and Silver Core Nanoparticles 9

1.4 Transfer to Aqueous Media of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles from Organic Solvents 11

1.5 Some Applications of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles 13

Acknowledgments 16

References 16

2 Ceramic Smart Drug Delivery Nanomaterials 23
Alejandro Baeza and María Vallet-Regí

2.1 Introduction 23

2.2 Biodistribution, Toxicity, and Excretion of Nanoparticles 24

2.3 Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles 27

2.4 Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles 32

2.5 Carbon Allotropes 33

2.6 Iron Oxide Nanoparticles 37

References 39

3 Polymersomes and their Biological Implications 49
Regina Bleul and Michael Maskos

3.1 Introduction 49

3.2 Self-Assembly of Amphiphiles 50

3.3 Polymersome – The Synthetic Analog of a Liposome 52

3.3.1 Polymersome Preparation Methods 52

3.3.2 Characterization of Polymersomes 56

3.4 Polymersomes as Drug Delivery Devices 57

3.4.1 Tuning Membrane Properties and Controlling the Release 58

3.4.2 Surface Functionalization and Targeting Strategies 68

3.5 Embedding Channel Proteins in Artificial Polymer Membranes and Creating New Applications 71

3.6 Conclusions and Outlook 74

List of Abbreviations 74

References 76

4 MOFs in Pharmaceutical Technology 83
C. Tamames-Tabar, A. García-Márquez, M. J. Blanco-Prieto, C. Serre, and P. Horcajada

4.1 Introduction 83

4.2 Metal-Organic Frameworks 84

4.2.1 Description 84

4.2.2 Synthesis, Formulation, and Functionalization/Shaping 85

4.2.3 Stability and Toxicity 87

4.3 MOFs for Therapeutics 90

4.3.1 BioMOFs 90

4.3.2 Active Ingredient Adsorption and Release from MOFs 92

4.3.3 Understanding 97

4.3.4 Theranostics 99

4.3.5 Efficacy 100

4.4 Conclusions 100

List of Abbreviations 101

References 103

5 Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles for Biomedicine 113
Fernando Novio, Daniel Ruiz-Molina, and Julia Lorenzo

5.1 Introduction 113

5.2 Interaction of Nanoplatforms with the Biological Environment 114

5.3 CPPs as Realistic Alternative to Classical Nanosystems 117

5.3.1 Encapsulation Systems Based on CPPs 119

5.3.2 Active Metal-Organic Units 122

5.3.3 Smart Delivery Systems 126

5.3.4 Bioimaging 128

5.3.5 Biocompatibility of CPPs 130

5.4 Conclusion and Future Challenges 132

References 133

6 Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia and Controlled Drug Delivery 139
Pablo Guardia, Andreas Riedinger, Hamilton Kakwere, Florence Gazeau, and Teresa Pellegrino

6.1 Introduction 139

6.2 Principles of Magnetically Induced Heat Generation 141

6.3 Synthesis of MNPs and their Heat Performance 146

6.3.1 Coprecipitation Method 147

6.3.2 Thermal Decomposition Method 150

6.4 Local Heating and Induced Biological and Drug Release Effects 159

6.5 In Vivo Drug Release from Magnetic Hybrid Systems Under Alternating Magnetic Field Exposure 163

References 166

7 Photothermal Effect of Gold Nanostructures for Application in Bioimaging and Therapy 173
Loredana Latterini and Luigi Tarpani

7.1 Introduction 173

7.2 Photophysical Characterization of Gold Nanostructures 174

7.2.1 Photophysical Behavior of Gold Nanostructures 174

7.2.2 Plasmonic Photothermal Effect 176

7.3 Tuning the Absorption Spectrum of Gold Nanostructures 177

7.3.1 Nanoparticles 177

7.3.2 Nanoshells 178

7.3.3 Nanorods 181

7.3.4 Other Types of Nanostructures 184

7.4 Plasmonic Photothermal Effect of GNS in Imaging 185

7.4.1 Photoacoustic Imaging 185

7.4.2 Photothermal Imaging 187

7.4.3 Photothermal Treatments or Manipulation 188

7.5 Concluding Remarks 192

Acknowledgment 193

List of Abbreviations 193

References 193

8 Nanomaterial-Based Bioimaging Probes 201
Christian Buchwalder, Katayoun Saatchi, and Urs O. Häfeli

8.1 Introduction 201

8.2 Nanoprobes 204

8.3 Imaging Probes 207

8.4 Targeting Strategies 211

8.4.1 Passive Targeting 212

8.4.2 Active Targeting 214

8.4.3 Limitations 216

8.5 Nanotheranostics 217

8.6 Design Considerations 219

8.7 Summary and Future Trends 223

References 223

9 Molecular Bases of Nanotoxicology 229
Angela Tino, Alfredo Ambrosone, Valentina Marchesano, and Claudia Tortiglione

9.1 Introduction 229

9.2 Impact on Environment: Nanoecotoxicology 229

9.3 Impact on Health: Nanotoxicology 232

9.3.1 The Basis of Nanogenotoxicity: NPs Affect DNA Integrity and Stability 235

9.3.2 Hallmarks of gene Expression in Response to NPs 236

9.3.3 New Frontiers in Nanotoxicology: Nanomaterials Drive Epigenetic Changes 244

References 248

Part II Bioinspired Materials – Bioinspired Materials for Technological Application 255

10 Bioinspired Interfaces for Self-cleaning Technologies 257
Victoria Dutschk

10.1 The Concept of Bioinspiration in Materials Engineering 257

10.1.1 Terms 257

10.1.2 Bioinspiration and Nanotechnology 259

10.2 Basics of Wetting 260

10.2.1 Contact Angle and Contact Angle Hysteresis 260

10.2.2 Contact Angle on Rough Surfaces 261

10.3 Self-cleaning Technologies 264

10.3.1 Fluid Transport 265

10.3.2 Biofouling 267

10.3.3 Water, Oil, and Stain Repellency 268

10.4 Summary 273

References 273

11 Catechol-Based Biomimetic Functional Materials and their Applications 277
Félix Busqué, Josep Sedó, Daniel Ruiz-Molina, and Javier Saiz-Poseu

11.1 Introduction 277

11.2 Adhesives 278

11.2.1 General Purpose Adhesives 278

11.2.2 Adhesive Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications 280

11.3 Functionalizable Platforms (Primers) on Macroscopic Surfaces 282

11.3.1 Polydopamine 283

11.3.2 Other Catechol-Containing Polymers 285

11.4 Micro-/Nanoscopic Surface Functionalization 288

11.4.1 Catechol-Modified Ferric NPs 288

11.4.2 Functionalization of Nano- and Microstructures Other than Fe3O4 NPs 290

11.5 Functional Scaffolds 290

11.5.1 Oriental Lacquers 290

11.5.2 Melanin 291

11.5.3 Polydopamine-Based Nanoparticles 293

11.6 Chelating Materials/Siderophore-Like Materials 293

11.6.1 Therapeutic Uses and Imaging 294

11.6.2 Heavy Metal Scavenging 295

11.7 Materials for Chemo-/Biosensing 296

11.8 Electronic Devices 297

11.8.1 Molecular Electronics 297

11.8.2 Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells 298

11.8.3 Miscellaneous Devices 301

References 301

12 Current Approaches to Designing Nanomaterials Inspired by Mussel Adhesive Proteins 309
Hao Meng, Joseph Gazella, and Bruce P. Lee

12.1 Introduction 309

12.2 Mussel Adhesive Proteins and DOPA 310

12.2.1 Catechol Side Chain Chemistry 310

12.3 Nanoparticle Stabilization 313

12.3.1 Grafting Catechol–Polymer Conjugate 314

12.3.2 Surface-Initiated Polymerization 315

12.3.3 Chemical Modification of Catechol Side Chain 316

12.4 Nanocomposite Materials 317

12.4.1 Nanocomposite Hydrogel 317

12.4.2 LbL Nanocomposite Films 318

12.4.3 Nanocomposite Fiber 319

12.4.4 Nanocomposite Rubber 320

12.5 Gecko and Mussel Dual Mimetic Adhesive 321

12.6 Polydopamine as a Multifunctional Anchor 322

12.6.1 Polydopamine-Mediated Hierarchical Surface Modification 322

12.6.2 Polydopamine-Coated Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Applications 323

12.7 Summary and Future Outlook 323

Acknowledgment 325

References 325

Part III Bioinspired Materials – Bioinspired Materials for Biomedical Applications 335

13 Functional Gradients in Biological Composites 337
André R. Studart, Rafael Libanori, and Randall M. Erb

13.1 Introduction 337

13.2 Chemical Gradient 340

13.3 Hydration Gradient 346

13.4 Mineral Gradient 349

13.5 Texture Gradient 353

13.6 Porosity Gradient 359

13.7 Conclusions 363

References 364

14 Novel Bioinspired Phospholipid Polymer Biomaterials for Nanobioengineering 369
Kazuhiko Ishihara

14.1 Introduction 369

14.2 Molecular Design of an Artificial Cell Membrane Surface 370

14.3 Polymer Nanoparticles System with an Artificial Cell Membrane Structure 372

14.3.1 Preparation of Polymer Nanoparticles with an Artificial Cell Membrane Structure 372

14.3.2 Functionality of Biomolecules Immobilized on an Artificial Cell Membrane Surface 373

14.3.3 Multiple Functions of the Artificial Cell Membrane Structure 376

14.4 Nanomaterials Entrapped in the Polymeric Nanoparticles with an Artificial Cell Membrane 379

14.4.1 Surface Modification of Quantum Dots (QDs) with Phospholipid Polymers 379

14.4.2 Encapsulation of QDs in the Polymeric Nanoparticles Covered with Artificial Cell Membrane 381

14.4.3 In-Cell Performance of Polymeric Nanoparticles Covered with Artificial Cell Membrane 382

14.5 Future Perspectives 386

List of Abbreviations 386

References 387

15 Bioinspired Functionalized Nanoparticles as Tools for Detection, Quantification and Targeting of Biomolecules 391
Carlos Lodeiro, Elisabete Oliveira, Cristina Núñez, Hugo M. Santos, Javier Fernández-Lodeiro, and Jose Luis Capelo

15.1 Introduction 391

15.2 Bioinspired Functionalized Nanoparticles 394

15.2.1 Bioinspired Probes and Nanoparticle Functionalization 394

15.3 Biomedical Applications 396

15.3.1 In Vitro Diagnostics Using Nanoparticles 396

15.4 Therapeutics Applications of Nanoparticles 398

15.4.1 Drug Delivery (DS) and Gene Delivery (GD) 398

15.4.2 Tumor Destruction via Heating and Radiation 399

15.4.3 Tissue Engineering 401

15.4.4 Bacterial Inactivation 402

15.5 Mass Spectrometry and Nanomaterials for Biomolecule Identification 402

15.5.1 Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs) 403

15.5.2 Magnetic, Silica, and Diamond Nanoparticles 408

15.6 Clinical Proteomics and Biomarker Detection 412

15.7 Concluding Remarks 414

Acknowledgments 414

References 414

16 Engineering Protein Based Nanoparticles for Applications in Tissue Engineering 425
Witold I. Tatkiewicz, Joaquin Seras-Franzoso, Cesar Díez-Gil, Elena García Fruitós, Esther Vázquez, Imma Ratera, Antoni Villaverde, and Jaume Veciana

16.1 Introduction 425

16.2 Inclusion Bodies; Protein-Based Nanoparticles as Novel Bionanomaterials 426

16.3 Physicochemical and Nanoscale Properties of Inclusion Bodies 427

16.3.1 Hydrophilicity of Inclusion Bodies 427

16.3.2 Nanomechanical Properties of IBs Determined by AFM 428

16.3.3 Stiffness Mapping of the IBs by AFM 430

16.3.4 Supramolecular Organization of Protein Nanoparticles (IBs) 432

16.4 Cell Proliferation Assisted by Protein-Based Nanoparticles 433

16.4.1 IB-Stimulation of Cell Proliferation 433

16.4.2 Properties of IBs are Sensed by Cells 435

16.5 Microscale Engineering of Protein-Based Nanoparticles for Cell Guidance 436

16.6 Conclusions and Perspectives 441

References 442

Index 447

See More

Author Information

Daniel Ruiz-Molina got his PhD on polyradical dendrimers at the Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona (ICMAB). Afterwards he took a postdoctoral position at the UC San Diego working on single-molecule magnets and molecular switches for three years. Since 2001 he got a permanent position at the CSIC. More recently he moved to the new Institut Catala de Nanociencia I Nanotecnologia (ICN2) where he is leading the Nanostructured Functional Materials group. His main research areas are fabrication of hybrid colloids and surfaces, biomimetic functional nanostructures, coordination polymers and micro-/nanoparticles for smart applications and encapsulation/delivery systems.

Fernando Novio is a researcher at the Institut Catala de Nanociencia I Nanotecnologia (ICN2) in Barcelona, Spain, in the group led by Prof. Ruiz- Molina. He received his PhD in chemistry from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, and afterwards did two years of post-doctorate study at the Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination of the Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse, France. Since joining ICN2 in 2011 he has initiated different research approaches based on the technological and biomedical application of nanostructures based on coordination polymers.

Claudio Roscini is a researcher in Prof. Ruiz-Molina?s group at the Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (ICN2) in Barcelona, Spain. He gained his PhD from the University of Bristol, UK, before spending two years as a post-doc at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. He was also a project manager at the Technology Institute Fundacion Privada ASCAMM in Barcelona. He joined ICN2 in 2013 where he is involved in the optimization of micro and nanoencapsulation processes on the small and large scale, and in the development of new nanostructured
See More

Related Titles

Back to Top