Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Nanotechnology for Energy Sustainability, 3 Volume Set

Baldev Raj (Editor), Marcel Van de Voorde (Editor), Yashwant Mahajan (Editor)
ISBN: 978-3-527-34014-9
1316 pages
June 2017
Nanotechnology for Energy Sustainability, 3 Volume Set (3527340149) cover image

Description

In three handy volumes, this ready reference provides a detailed overview of nanotechnology as it is applied to energy sustainability. Clearly structured, following an introduction, the first part of the book is dedicated to energy production, renewable energy, energy storage, energy distribution, and energy conversion and harvesting. The second part then goes on to discuss nano-enabled materials, energy conservation and management, technological and intellectual property-related issues and markets and environmental remediation. The text concludes with a look at and recommendations for future technology advances.
An essential handbook for all experts in the field - from academic researchers and engineers to developers in industry.
See More

Table of Contents

Foreword by Prof. Dr. Dr. hc. Mult. Herbert Gleiter XXXV

Foreword by Prof. Dr. Joachim Maier XXXVII

Foreword by Prof. C.N.R. RAO, F.R.S. XXXIX

“Perspective” on the Book on Nanotechnology for Sustainable Energy by Prof. Tu Hailing XLI

A Way Forward by Baldev Raj, Marcel Van de Voorde, and Yashwant Mahajan XLV

Introduction by Baldev Raj, Marcel Van de Voorde, and Yashwant Mahajan LIII

Volume 1

Part One Energy Production 1

1 Fossil Fuels: The Effect of Zeolite Catalyst Particle Morphology on Catalyst Performance in the Conversion of Methanol to Hydrocarbons 3
Katarzyna Anna Łukaszuk, Pablo del Campo Huertas, Andrea Molino, Malte Nielsen, Daniel Rojo-Gama, Juan Salvador Martinez-Espin, Karl Petter Lillerud, Unni Olsbye, Silvia Bordiga, Pablo Beato, and Stian Svelle

1.1 Zeolites and Zeotypes as Nanocatalysts for Petroleum and Natural Gas 3

1.2 Modification of Porosity: Hierarchical Zeolites 4

1.3 Modification of Size and Morphology 8

1.4 Tools to Predict and Characterize Zeolite Morphology 14

1.5 Tailor-Made Catalysts for the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons (MTH) Reaction 18

1.6 Summary and Outlook 29

Acknowledgments 30

References 30

2 Fossil Fuels: Nanotechnologies for Petroleum Reservoir Engineering 41
Igor N. Evdokimov

2.1 Introduction 41

2.2 Addition of Nanosized Colloidal Particles to Technological Fluids 42

2.3 Indigenous Nanocolloidal Particles in Native Petroleum Fluids 51

2.4 Conclusions 53

2.5 Appendix 54

References 55

3 Fossil Fuels: Coke-Resistant Nanomaterials for Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Fuels 59
Brian A. Rosen and Sarika Singh

3.1 Introduction to Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Technology 59

3.2 A Thermodynamic View of Catalyst Coking 60

3.3 Tuning of Active Sites to Resist Coking 65

3.4 Methods for Characterizing Carbon Deposits 71

3.5 Summary and Outlook 79

References 79

4 Photovoltaics: Light Energy Harvesting with Plasmonic Nanoparticle Networks 83
Jean-Paul Hugonin, Mondher Besbes, and Philippe Ben-Abdallah

4.1 Introduction 83

4.2 Light Absorption by a Single Particle 84

4.3 Light Absorption by a Collection of Particles 86

4.4 Upper Bound for Light Absorption in Nanoparticle Networks 89

4.5 Light Absorption Beyond the Dipolar Approximation 91

4.6 Design of Absorption Spectrum with Plasmonic Particles 93

4.7 Concluding Remarks 97

Acknowledgments 97

References 98

5 Photovoltaics: Role of Nanotechnology in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells 101
Murugesan Janani, Shantikumar V. Nair, and A. Sreekumaran Nair

5.1 Nanotechnology and Its Relevance 101

5.2 A Brief History on Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) 102

5.3 Construction and Working of DSSCs 103

5.4 Transparent Conducting Substrate 104

5.5 Semiconductor Materials 105

5.6 Nanotechnology vis–à–vis Renewable Energy Industry 105

5.7 Nanotechnology vis–à–vis Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells 105

5.8 Sensitizer 118

5.9 Plasmonics 122

5.10 Counter Electrode 124

5.11 Conclusions 127

References 128

6 Photovoltaics: Nanomaterials for Photovoltaic Conversion 133
Abdelilah Slaoui, Daniel Lincot, Jean François Guillemoles, and Ludovic Escoubas

6.1 Introduction 133

6.2 Photovoltaic Materials and Technologies: State of the Art 134

6.3 Nanomaterials for Photovoltaics 137

6.4 Conclusion and Outlook 157

References 158

7 Photovoltaics: Light-Trapping in Crystalline Silicon and Thin-Film Solar Cells by Nanostructured Optical Coatings 163
Pierpaolo Spinelli, B.K. Newman, and A. Polman

7.1 Introduction 163

7.2 Crystalline Si Solar Cells 165

7.3 Nanostructured Coatings for Thin-Film Solar Cells 171

7.4 Other PV Applications of Resonant Nanostructures 176

7.5 Summary 177

References 178

8 Photovoltaics: Nanoengineered Materials and Their Functionality in Solar Cells 181
Kaining Ding, Thomas Kirchartz, Karsten Bittkau, Andreas Lambertz, Vladimir Smirnov, Jürgen Hüpkes, and Uwe Rau

8.1 Introduction 181

8.2 Functional Elements of a Solar Cell 182

8.3 Transparent and Conductive Front Electrodes 185

8.4 Nanostructured Contact Material 187

8.5 Nanostructured Absorber Materials 191

8.6 Back Electrodes and Intermediate Layer 196

8.7 Conclusions 200

References 200

9 Nonselective Coatings for Solar Thermal Applications in CSP 207
Raj Kumar Bera, Daniel Mandler, and Shlomo Magdassi

9.1 Introduction 207

9.2 Materials 210

9.3 Fabrication Methods 212

9.4 Performance 215

9.5 Advantages and Disadvantages of Nonselective Overselective Coatings 227

9.6 Conclusions and Perspectives 227

9.7 Future Aspects 228

References 229

10 Selective Surfaces for Solar Thermal Energy Conversion in CSP: From Multilayers to Nanocomposites 231
Audrey Soum-Glaude, Laurie Di Giacomo, Sébastien Quoizola, Thomas Laurent, and Gilles Flamant

10.1 Introduction 231

10.2 State of the Art on Selective Surfaces for Solar Thermal Energy Conversion 232

10.3 W–SiC Multinanolayers as High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings 237

10.4 Conclusions 243

Acknowledgments 244

References 244

11 Nanobiotechnology Augmenting Biological Gaseous Energy Recovery 249
Shantonu Roy and Debabrata Das

11.1 Introduction 249

11.2 Dark Fermentative Hydrogen Production and Its Improvement Using Nanoparticles 250

11.3 Gaseous Energy Extraction via Biomethanation Process and Improvement of Biomethanation Process Using
Nanoparticles 256

11.4 BioH2 Production via Photofermentation and Role of Nanoparticles in the Improvement of H2 Production 260

11.5 Photocatalytic Conversion of Acetate in Spent Media to H2 262

11.6 Conclusion 265

Acknowledgments 266

References 266

12 Nanotechnologies in Sodium-Cooled Fast Spectrum Reactor and Closed Fuel Cycle Sustainable Nuclear Energy System 271
Baldev Raj and U. Kamachi Mudali

12.1 Introduction 271

12.2 Nanomaterials for Nuclear Systems 273

12.3 Nanosensors, Surface Modification, and Coatings for Reactor and Reprocessing Applications 280

12.4 Surface Modification and Coating Technologies Based on Nanotechnology 285

12.5 Summary 290

Acknowledgments 291

References 291

13 Nanotechnology and Applications for Electric Power: The Perspective of a Major Player in Electricity 295
Didier Noël

13.1 The Context and Perspective of a Global Player in Electricity 295

13.2 The Issue of Nanotechnology for Electric Power 298

13.3 Main Subjects Studied 299

13.4 Social Acceptance and Health Risk 315

13.5 Conclusions 320

Acknowledgments 320

References 320

14 Lightweight Nanostructured Materials and Their Certification for Wind Energy Applications 323
Bikramjit Basu, Sherine Alex, and N. Eswara Prasad

14.1 Introduction 323

14.2 Property Requirements for Wind Energy Applications 326

14.3 Brief Overview on Materials for Wind Energy Applications 332

14.4 Properties of Bulk Ceramic Nanomaterials 339

14.5 Certification 342

14.6 Conclusion and Outlook 346

Acknowledgments 348

References 348

Volume 2

Part Two Energy Storage and Distribution 353

15 Nanostructured Materials for Next-Generation Lithium-Ion Batteries 355
T. Sri Devi Kumari, T. Prem Kumar, and A.K. Shukla

15.1 Introduction 355

15.2 Anode-Active Materials 357

15.3 Cathode-Active Materials 361

15.4 Electrolytes 362

15.5 New Reactions 364

15.6 Safety 367

15.7 Conclusions 369

References 369

16 Carbon Nanotube Materials to Realize High-Performance Supercapacitors 377
Anthony Childress, Jingyi Zhu, Mehmet Karakaya, Deepika Saini, Ramakrishna Podila, and Apparao Rao

16.1 Introduction 377

16.2 CNI’s Contributions 380

16.3 Sustainability 386

16.4 Conclusions and Future Prospects 387

Acknowledgment 387

References 387

17 Recent Developments and Prospects of Nanostructured Supercapacitors 391
Katherine L. Van Aken and Yury Gogotsi

17.1 Introduction 391

17.2 Properties of Supercapacitors 391

17.3 Terminology and Electric Double Layer 393

17.4 Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors 395

17.5 Electrolytes for Electrochemical Capacitors 398

17.6 Electrode–Electrolyte Interfaces 400

17.7 Design of Capacitive Energy Storage Devices through Electrode–Electrolyte Coupling 404

17.8 Future Outlook and Recommendations 409

Acknowledgments 410

References 410

18 Nanostructured and Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage 415
Lars H. Jepsen, Mark Paskevicius, and Torben R. Jensen

18.1 Introduction 415

18.2 The “Weaker” Bonds Formed by Hydrogen 417

18.3 The “Stronger” Bonds Formed by Hydrogen 418

18.4 Conclusion 427

References 427

19 Nanotechnology for the Storage of Hydrogen 433
Marek Nowak and Mieczyslaw Jurczyk

19.1 Introduction 433

19.2 Nanotechnology 433

19.3 Intermetallics-Based Hydrides with Nanostructure 440

19.4 Nanocomposite-Based Hydrides 452

19.5 Summary 456

References 456

20 Phase Change Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage 459
Kinga Pielichowska and Krzysztof Pielichowski

20.1 Introduction 459

20.2 Nanoenhanced PCMs 461

20.3 Nanostructured PCMs 476

20.4 Conclusions 478

Acknowledgment 479

References 479

21 Carbon Nanotube Wires and Cables: Near-Term Applications and Future Perspectives 485
Jeremy Lee and Seeram Ramakrishna

21.1 Introduction 485

21.2 Carbon Nanotube Wires and Cables 490

21.3 Applications of CNT Wires and Cables 500

21.4 Conclusion 502

Acknowledgments 502

References 502

Part Three Energy Conversion and Harvesting 507

22 Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials: Current Research and Future Challenges 509
Hilaal Alam and Seeram Ramakrishna

22.1 Introduction to Thermoelectricity 509

22.2 Challenges to Increase the Efficiency 511

22.3 Electronic and Phonon Properties 516

22.4 Current Researches: Thermoelectric Nano Materials materials and Their Performances 518

22.5 Future Challenges 530

22.6 Roadmap for the Future Researches 533

22.7 Conclusion 535

References 537

23 Nanostructured Cost-Effective and Energy-Efficient Thermoelectric Materials 547
Zhi-Gang Chen and Jin Zou

23.1 Introduction 547

23.2 Key Parameters for Controlling ZT 548

23.3 Material Requirements 550

23.4 Nanostructure Engineering to Lower Thermal Conductivity 551

23.5 Band Engineering to Enhance the Power Factor 554

23.6 Development of Cost-Effective and Energy-Efficient Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials 555

23.7 Outlook and Future Challenge 559

Acknowledgment 560

References 560

24 Nanomaterials for Fuel Cell Technology 569
K.S. Dhathathreyan, N. Rajalakshmi, and R. Balaji

24.1 Introduction 569

24.2 Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell and Fuel Cells Operating on Small Organic Molecules 569

24.3 Role of Nanomaterials in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells 579

24.4 Conclusion 585

References 586

25 Contributions of Nanotechnology to Hydrogen Production 597
Sambandam Anandan, Femi Thomas Cheruvathoor, and Muthupandian Ashokkumar

25.1 Introduction 597

25.2 Photocatalytic Water Splitting Reaction 598

25.3 Nano Semiconductor Materials for Photocatalytic Water Splitting 600

25.4 Summary 624

Acknowledgment 624

References 625

26 Nanoenhanced Materials for Photolytic Hydrogen Production 629
Xiuquan Gu, Shuai Yuan, Mingguo Ma, and Jiefang Zhu

26.1 Introduction 629

26.2 Basic Principle and Evaluation Methods for Photolytic H2 Production 630

26.3 Photolytic H2 Evolution Based on Nanoenhanced Materials 632

26.4 Conclusion and Outlook 645

Acknowledgments 646

References 646

27 Human Vibration Energy Harvester with PZT 649
Tamil Selvan Ramadoss and Seeram Ramakrishna

27.1 Introduction to Micro Energy Harvesting 649

27.2 Human Vibration Energy Harvester with PZT 655

27.3 Alternative Design of Cantilever Piezoelectric Energy Harvester 660

27.4 Stress Distribution Simulation for Different Surface Shapes 664

27.5 Variable Profile Thickness of the Metal Shim 666

27.6 Comparison of Stress Distribution for Various Surface Shapes and Profiles 671

27.7 Output Power Comparison of Various Profiles 672

27.8 Conclusion 673

Acknowledgment 674

References 674

28 Energy Consumption in Information and Communication Technology: Role of Semiconductor Nanotechnology 679
Victor V. Zhirnov and Kota V.R.M. Murali

28.1 Introduction 679

28.2 Elements of Information Processing 681

28.3 Energy Consumption in Computing: From Bits to Millions of Instructions per Second (MIPS) 687

28.4 Fundamental Physics of Binary Operations 690

28.5 Opportunities for Beyond the Current Information and Communication Technology Paradigm 701

References 704

Volume 3

Part Four Nanoenabled Materials and Coatings for Energy Applications 707

29 Nanocrystalline Bainitic Steels for Industrial Applications 709
C. Garcia-Mateo and F.G. Caballero

29.1 Introduction 709

29.2 Design of Nanocrystalline Steel Grades: Scientific Concepts 709

29.3 Microstructure and Properties 712

29.4 Summary 721

Acknowledgments 721

References 722

30 Graphene and Graphene Oxide for Energy Storage 725
Edward P. Randviir and Craig E. Banks

30.1 Graphene Hits the Headlines 725

30.2 Graphene: Why All the Fuss? 726

30.3 Graphene and Graphene Oxide in Energy Storage Devices 727

30.4 Graphene and Graphene Oxide in Energy Generation Devices 734

References 741

31 Inorganic Nanotubes and Fullerene-Like Nanoparticles at the Crossroad between Materials Science and Nanotechnology and Their Applications with Regard to Sustainability 745
Leela S. Panchakarla and Reshef Tenne

31.1 Introduction 745

31.2 Synthesis and Structural Characterization 746

31.3 Doping Inorganic Fullerenes/Nanotubes 757

31.4 Applications 758

31.5 Fullerenes and Nanotubular Structures from Misfit Layered Compounds 764

31.6 Conclusions 776

References 776

32 Nanotechnology, Energy, and Fractals Nature 781
Vojislav V. Mitic ́, Ljubiša M. Kocic ́, Steven Tidrow, and Hans-Jörg Fecht

32.1 Introduction 781

32.2 Short Introduction to Fractals 782

32.3 Nanosizes and Fractals 784

32.4 Energy and Fractals 788

32.5 Toward Fractal Nanoelectronics 793

32.6 The Goldschmidt’s Tolerance Factor, Clausius–Mossotti Relation, Curie, and Curie–Weiss Law Bridge to Fractal Nanoelectronics Contribution 797

32.7 Summary 803

Acknowledgment 805

References 805

33 Magnesium Based Nanocomposites for Cleaner Transport 809
Manoj Gupta and Sankaranarayanan Seetharaman

33.1 Introduction 809

33.2 Fabrication of Magnesium-based Nanocomposites 811

33.3 Mechanical Properties and Corrosion 814

33.4 Engineering Properties 822

33.5 Potential Applications in Transport Industries 824

33.6 Challenges 825

33.7 Conclusions 825

References 826

34 Nanocomposites: A Gaze through Their Applications in Transport Industry 831
Kottan Renganayagalu Ravi, Jayakrishnan Nampoothiri, and Baldev Raj

34.1 Introduction 831

34.2 Polymer Matrix Nanocomposites in Transport Sector 832

34.3 Lightweight High-strength Metal Matrix Nanocomposites 838

34.4 Ceramic Matrix Nanocomposites in Transport Industry 845

34.5 Nanocomposite Coating 849

34.6 Challenges and Opportunities for Nanocomposites 849

References 851

35 Semiconducting Nanowires in Photovoltaic and Thermoelectric Energy Generation 857
Guglielmo Vastola and Gang Zhang

35.1 Introduction 857

35.2 Fabrication of Silicon and Silicon–Germanium Nanowires 858

35.3 Nanowire-based Photovoltaics 865

35.4 Introduction of Thermoelectric Effects 871

35.5 Thermal Conductivity of Silicon Nanowires 874

35.6 Thermoelectric Property of Silicon Nanowires 876

35.7 Thermoelectric Property of Silicon–Germanium Nanowires 877

35.8 Thermoelectric Property of Other Nanowires 879

References 881

36 Nanoliquid Metal Technology Toward High-Performance Energy Management, Conversion, and Storage 887
Jing Liu

36.1 Introduction 887

36.2 Typical Properties of Nanoliquid Metal 889

36.3 Emerging Applications of Nanoliquid Metal in Energy Areas 892

36.4 Challenging Scientific and Technological Issues 904

36.5 Summary 906

Acknowledgment 907

References 907

37 IoNanofluids: Innovative Agents for Sustainable Development 911
Carlos Nieto de Castro, Xavier Paredes, Salomé Vieira, Sohel Murshed, Maria José Lourenço, and Fernando Santos

37.1 Introduction 911

37.2 IoNanofluids: Nature, Definitions, Preparation, and Structure Characterization 912

37.3 IoNanofluids Properties 920

37.4 Applications of IoNanofluids 926

37.5 Challenges in IoNanofluids Research 930

37.6 Challenges to Industrial Applications 931

Acknowledgments 932

References 932

Part Five Energy Conservation and Management 937

38 Silica Aerogels for Energy Conservation and Saving 939
Yamini Ananthan, K. Keerthi Sanghamitra, and Neha Hebalkar

38.1 Introduction 939

38.2 Thermal Insulation Materials 940

38.3 Aerogels 940

38.4 Preparation 944

38.5 Aerogels in Various Forms: Monoliths, Granules, and Sheets 945

38.6 Thermal Insulation Applications 954

38.7 Energy Saving and Conservation Using Aerogel Products 960

38.8 Challenges and Future Perspectives 961

38.9 Safety and Hazard Measures 962

38.10 Summary 962

Acknowledgments 963

References 963

39 Nanotechnology in Architecture 967
George Elvin

39.1 Nanotechnology and Green Building 967

39.2 Energy 969

39.3 Air and Water 978

39.4 Materials 980

39.5 Nanosensors 990

39.6 Environmental and Health Concerns 991

References 992

40 Nanofluids for Efficient Heat Transfer Applications 997
Baldev Raj, S.A. Angayarkanni, and John Philip

40.1 Introduction 997

40.2 Traditional Nanofluids 999

40.3 CNT-Based Nanofluids 1008

40.4 Magnetic Nanofluids 1009

40.5 Graphene Nanofluids 1012

40.6 Hybrid Nanofluid 1013

40.7 Thermal Conductivity of Phase Change Material 1015

40.8 Conclusions 1018

Acknowledgment 1019

References 1019

Part Six Technologies, Intellectual Property, and Markets 1029

41 Nanomaterials for Li-Ion Batteries: Patents Landscape and Product Scenario 1031
Md Shakeel Iqbal, Nisha C. Kalarickal, Vivek Patel, and Ratnesh Kumar Gaur

41.1 Introduction 1031

41.2 Lithium-Ion Battery: Basic Concepts 1031

41.3 Advantages of Nanostructured Materials 1034

41.4 Patent Analysis 1035

41.5 Technology Analysis 1038

41.6 Commercial Status of Nano-Enabled Li-Ion Batteries 1050

41.7 Market 1051

41.8 Conclusions and Future Perspectives 1051

References 1053

42 Nanotechnology in Fuel Cells: A Bibliometric Analysis 1057
Manish Sinha, Ratnesh Kumar Gaur, and Harshad Karmarkar

42.1 Introduction 1057

42.2 Literature Analysis 1058

42.3 Patent Landscaping 1061

42.4 Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Patent Analysis 1067

42.5 Technology Analysis 1070

42.6 Scenario of Commercial Products Can Be Moved after Future Perspectives 1075

42.7 Future Perspectives 1077

42.8 Conclusion 1077

Acknowledgments 1078

43 Techno-Commercial Opportunities of Nanotechnology in Wind Energy 1079
Vivek Patel and Y.R. Mahajan

43.1 Introduction 1079

43.2 Wind Energy Industry Requirements 1080

43.3 Growth Drivers 1081

43.4 Challenges 1081

43.5 Applications 1083

43.6 Intellectual Property Scenario 1094

43.7 Products Outlook 1098

43.8 Future Development and Directions 1100

43.9 Conclusion 1102

Acknowledgment 1103

References 1103

Part Seven Environmental Remediation 1107

44 Nanomaterials for the Conversion of Carbon Dioxide into Renewable Fuels and Value-Added Products 1109
Ibram Ganesh

44.1 Introduction: Dealing with the Waste Stream Greenhouse CO2 Gas 1109

44.2 Theoretical Potentials for Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 1112

44.3 CO2 Speciation versus Electrolyte pH 1120

44.4 Effect of Particle Size on Electrode Performance in Electrochemical CO2 Reduction Reaction 1125

44.5 Effect of Particle Size on the Efficiency of Aqueous-Based CO2 Reduction Reactions 1126

44.6 Effect of Particle Size on the Efficiency of Nonaqueous-Based CO2 Reduction Reactions 1129

44.7 Reverse Microbial Fuel Cells: The Practical Artificial Leaves 1133

44.8 Concluding Remarks and Future Perspectives 1136

Acknowledgments 1136

References 1136

45 Nanomaterial-Based Methods for Cleaning Contaminated Water in Oil Spill Sites 1139
Boris I. Kharisov, H.V. Rasika Dias, Oxana V. Kharissova, and Yolanda Peña Méndez

45.1 Introduction 1139

45.2 Inorganic Nanomaterials and Composites 1141

45.3 Nanosized Natural and Synthetic Polymers 1151

45.4 Nanomaterials-Based Membranes 1153

45.5 Aerogels 1153

45.6 Toxicity, Cost, and Selection of Nanomaterials for Water Cleanup from Oil 1154

45.7 Conclusions and Further Outlook 1155

References 1156

46 Nanomaterials and Direct Air Capture of CO2 1161
Dirk Fransaer

46.1 Introduction 1161

46.2 CO2 as a Resource 1163

46.3 Circular CO2 Economy 1165

46.4 CO2 Capture or Separation Technologies 1165

46.5 New Roads into CO2 Capture: Direct Air Capture and Nanomaterials 1168

46.6 Nanomaterials 1169

46.7 Carbon Nanotubes 1171

46.8 Conclusion 1174

References 1174

Index 1179

See More

Author Information

Baldev Raj is Professor and Director of the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) in Bengaluru, India. He obtained his PhD from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc.) in Bangalore, India, in 1989. He has pursued his work in interdisciplinary domains of energy, cultural heritage, medical technologies, nanoscience and technology and education.
Prof. Raj has authored more than 1100 scientific publications and 70 books. He has been recognized by way of more than 100 awards, 380 honors, keynote, invited lectures and assignments in more than 30 countries. He is a fellow of all major science, engineering and social sciences academies in India.

Marcel Van de Voorde has 40 years` experience in European Research Organisations including CERN-Geneva, European Commission, with 10 years at the Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart, Germany. For many years, he was involved in research and research strategies, policy and management, especially in European research institutions. He holds a Professorship at the University of Technology in Delft, the Netherlands, as well as multiple visiting professorships in Europe and worldwide. He holds a doctor honoris causa and various honorary Professorships.
He is senator of the European Academy for Sciences and Arts, in Salzburg and Fellow of the World Academy for Sciences. He is a Fellow of various scientific societies and has been decorated by the Belgian King. He has authored of multiple scientific and technical publications and co-edited multiple books in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Y. R. Mahajan obtained his PhD from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in New York, USA, in 1978. He carried out his postdoctoral research at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, USA. Then he held various roles as senior scientist at the Defense Metallurgical Research Laboratory; associate director, ARC International; associate technology director, Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad, India. Under his leadership, a number of ceramic-based technologies were developed and transferred to industry. Since 2009, he is working as a technical advisor at the Centre for Knowledge Management of Nanoscience and Technology in Telangana, India. Dr. Mahajan has published more than 130 scientific publications and holds 13 patents.
See More

Related Titles

Back to Top