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Organic Electronics II: More Materials and Applications

Hagen Klauk (Editor)
ISBN: 978-3-527-64022-5
440 pages
April 2012
Organic Electronics II: More Materials and Applications (3527640223) cover image

Description

Like its predecessor this book is devoted to the materials, manufacturing and applications aspects of organic thin-film transistors. Once
again authored by the most renowned experts from this fascinating and fast-moving area of research, it offers a joint perspective both
broad and in-depth on the latest developments in the areas of materials chemistry, transport physics, materials characterization, manufacturing technology, and circuit integration of organic transistors. With its many figures and detailed index, this book once again also serves as a ready reference.
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Table of Contents

Preface

PART I: Materials

ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS FOR TRANSISTORS
General Considerations
Materials Properties of Organic Semiconductors
Small Molecule Semiconductors
Polymer Semiconductors
Semiconductor Blends
Device Physics and Architecture
Summary

CHARACTERIZATION OF ORDER AND ORIENTATION IN SEMICONDUCTING POLYMERS
Introduction
X-Ray Diffraction
Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) Spectroscopy

CHARGE TRANSPORT THEORIES IN ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTORS
Introduction
Well-Ordered Systems: Organic Single Crystals
Disordered Materials
Conclusions

SILYLETHYNE-SUBSTITUTED ACENES AND HETEROACENES
Introduction
Silylethyne-Substituted Pentacenes
Crystal Packing
Heteroacenes
Silylethynyl Heteroacene-Based Polymers
Silylethynyl Heteroacene-Based Photovoltaics
Conclusion

CONJUGATED SEMICONDUCTORS FOR ORGANIC n-CHANNEL TRANSISTORS AND COMPLEMENTARY CIRCUITS
Introduction
Basics of Field-Effect Transistors and Complementary Circuits
Material Design and Needs for n-Channel OTFTs
n-Channel Semiconductors for OTFTs
Conclusions and Outlook

LOW-VOLTAGE ELECTROLYTE-GATED OTFTs AND THEIR APPLICATIONS
Overview
Introduction to Electrolyte-Gated Organic Transistors
Applications of Electrolyte-Gated Organic Transistors
Conclusions and Outlook

PART II: Manufacturing

PRINTING TECHNIQUES FOR THIN-FILM ELECTRONICS
The Motivation for Printing of Thin-Film Electronic Devices
Requirements for Printing Techniques for Electronic Fabrication
A Survey of Printing Techniques for Printed Electronics
Pattern Formation During Printing
Printed Device Considerations

PICOLITER AND SUBFEMTOLITER INK-JET TECHNOLOGIES FOR ORGANIC TRANSISITORS
Introduction
Silver Nanoparticle Ink
Ink-Jet Technologies with Pico- and Subfemtoliter Accuracies
Manufacturing Processes and Electrical Characteristics of Organic Transisitors
Discussion and Future Prospects of Large-Area Printed Electronics

INK-JET PRINTING OF DOWNSCALED ORGANIC ELECTRONICS DEVICES
Introduction
Ink-Jet Printing: Technologies, Tools, and Materials
High-Resolution Printing of Highly Conductive Electrodes
Printing of Downscaled Organic Thin Film Transistors
Conclusions and Outlook

INTERPLAY BETWEEN PROCESSING, STRUCTURE, AND ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES IN SOLUBLE SMALL-MOLECULE ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTORS
Introduction
Transport Limits in Crystalline Semiconductors
Structure-Processing-Properties Relationship in Small-Molecule Organic Thin-Film Transistors
Advanced Film Processing
Summary

PART III: Applications

LIGHT-EMITTING ORGANIC TRANSISTORS
Introduction
Unipolar Light-Emitting FETs
Ambipolar Light-Emitting FETs
Other Field-Effect-Based Light-Emitting Devices
Conclusions

DESIGN METHODOLOGIES FOR ORGANIC RFID TAGS AND SENSOR READOUT ON FOIL
Introduction
Organic RFID Tags
Transistor-Level Design with Organic Transistors
Conclusions
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Author Information

Hagen Klauk received his PhD in electrical engineering from The Pennsylvania State University in 1999, receiving the Xerox Research Award for his doctorate on organic thin film transistors. In 2000 he joined Infineon Technologies in Erlangen, Germany and since 2005 he has been a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany, where he is investigating a wide range of novel organic device concepts. His work has led to more than seventy publications and forty patents.
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