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Tools for Project Management, Workshops and Consulting: A Must-Have Compendium of Essential Tools and Techniques, 3rd Edition

ISBN: 978-3-89578-723-2
488 pages
September 2016
Tools for Project Management, Workshops and Consulting: A Must-Have Compendium of Essential Tools and Techniques, 3rd Edition (389578723X) cover image

Description

"This book is of the kind you always wanted but didn't think would or could ever exist: the universal field theory of problem solving." Tom Sommerlatte
Typically today's tasks in management and consulting include project management, running workshops and strategic work - all complex activities, which require a multitude of skills and competencies. This standard work, which is also well accepted amongst consultants, gives you a reference or cookbook-style access to the most important tools, including a rating of each tool in terms of applicability, ease of use and effectiveness.
In this considerably enlarged third edition, Nicolai Andler presents 152 of such tools, grouped into task-specific categories: Definition of a Situation/Problem - Information Gathering - Creativity - Information Consolidation - Goal Setting - Strategic, Technical and Organisational Analysis - Evaluation and Decision Making - Project Management.
Checklists and Application Scenarios further enhance the use of this toolbox. Information provided by this book is:
- comprehensive and sufficiently wide in scope, combined with a practical level of detail without being too academic
- reliable and proven in numerous real implemented cases
- easy to apply due to many different search options, checklists, application scenarios and guiding instructions.
Written by a professional consultant, business analyst and business coach, this book is a unique reference work and guide for those wanting to learn about or who are active in the fields of consulting, project management and problem solving in general, both in business and engineering: business coaches and management trainers, workshop moderators, consultants and managers, project managers, lecturers and students.
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Table of Contents

Brief contents/Overview of tools 5

Application areas of each tool 9

1 Introduction to the concept and application of this book 23

1.1 Structure of this book 23

1.2 How to use the book 23

1.3 The target audience of this book 24

1.4 The scope of this book 25

1.5 Skills and competencies for your personal development 25

1.6 Clarification on methodologies, models, tools and techniques 27

2 Problem solving approach and application 29

2.1 Problem solving 29

2.1.1 Different problem solving processes and approaches 30

2.1.2 The problem solving process used in this book 31

2.1.3 Mental thinking levels during problem solving 35

2.1.4 Problem solving process and consulting process 36

2.1.5 The author’s assumptions 38

2.1.6 Macro logic project cycle – micro logic problem solving cycle 40

2.2 Categories of tools 44

2.3 How to select the right tool 48

2.3.1 Overview of tools 48

2.3.2 Where ‘in’ the problem solving process am I? 49

2.3.3 Checklist for problem solving processes to identify required tool 49

2.3.4 What is the right category? 50

2.3.5 How to compile the shopping list 50

2.3.6 Application sequence of tools 52

3 Diagnosis 54

3.1 Definition of a situation/problem 54

3.1.1 5W Problem questions 58

3.1.2 Problem definition 59

3.1.3 Boundary examination 65

3.1.4 Problem tree 68

3.1.5 From As-Is to To-Be 72

3.1.6 Problem goal twist 75

3.1.7 SPIN 77

3.1.8 Kepner/Tregoe problem diagnosis 79

3.1.9 Reverse the problem 81

3.1.10 Hypotheses 82

3.1.11 Hypothesis tree 83

3.1.12 Competing hypotheses 88

3.1.13 Issue tree 89

3.1.14 Influence matrix 92

3.1.15 Fishbone or Cause-effect tool 94

3.1.16 Black box 96

3.1.17 IS – IS NOT 99

3.1.18 Stakeholder expectation management 101

3.1.19 Stakeholder analysis 103

3.1.20 Stakeholder map 109

3.1.21 Stakeholder influence matrix 112

3.1.22 Stakeholder accordion 114

3.1.23 Stakeholder swapping 116

3.1.24 Context diagram 118

3.1.25 Silo view 122

3.1.26 Helicoptering 124

3.1.27 Mind map 125

3.1.28 Diagnosis plan 128

3.2 Information gathering 130

3.2.1 Desk research/database research 144

3.2.2 Interview (unstructured) 145

3.2.3 Socratic debate 146

3.2.4 Focus interview 150

3.2.5 Systemic questions 152

3.2.6 Six Pillars 156

3.2.7 Tripod (mixed) 160

3.2.8 Octagon 161

3.2.9 Focus groups (unstructured) 163

3.2.10 Survey/field study – dipstick 165

3.2.11 Direct observation (DILO = day in the life of) 167

3.2.12 Delphi or expert panel 168

3.2.13 Scenario analysis 169

3.2.14 Questionnaire (structured) 171

3.2.15 Climate assessment (structured) 173

3.2.16 Information gathering plan 177

3.2.17 5 Whys 178

3.3 Creativity 179

3.3.1 Brainstorming 182

3.3.2 Cardstorming 184

3.3.3 6-3-5 186

3.3.4 Questions circle 187

3.3.5 Lotus blossom 188

3.3.6 Irritating words 189

3.3.7 Mental provocation 191

3.3.8 Cross associations 192

3.3.9 Funny Man 194

3.3.10 Opponents advocate 195

3.3.11 Fishpond 197

3.3.12 Bionic 198

3.3.13 Synectics 198

3.3.14 Bisociations 202

3.3.15 Distraction 203

3.3.16 Provocative associations 204

3.3.17 RARA 205

3.3.18 Morphological matrix 207

3.3.19 Attribute listing 208

3.3.20 Nyaka (defect analysis) 209

3.3.21 Merlin technique/Osborn checklist 211

3.4 Information consolidation 214

3.4.1 Cornell notes 219

3.4.2 Pareto (80:20) 221

3.4.3 ABC 223

3.4.4 Information matrix 225

3.4.5 Card sorting 227

3.4.6 Affinity diagram 228

3.4.7 Venn diagram 230

3.4.8 Force field 232

4 Goals and objectives setting 235

4.1 Objectives tree 240

4.2 Goal hierarchy 243

4.3 Charter 246

4.4 Goal catalogue 247

4.5 X-matrix (Hoshin) 250

4.6 SMART goals 253

4.7 Goal grid 254

4.8 Well-defined outcomes 255

4.9 3 P statements 258

4.10 SNAP 259

5 Analysis 261

5.1 Strategic analysis 264

5.1.1 Value chain analysis 267

5.1.2 Critical success factor (CSF) 271

5.1.3 Hedgehog 274

5.1.4 SWOT and TOWS 277

5.1.5 Life cycle 284

5.1.6 5 Forces 289

5.1.7 Competitor analysis 293

5.1.8 Customer segmentation 297

5.1.9 Strategic market group 300

5.1.10 Environmental analysis (PEST) 304

5.1.11 Excursion: Introduction into strategic development 306

5.1.12 Business matrix 307

5.1.13 Product/market mix 312

5.1.14 Blue ocean 315

5.1.15 Strategic development options 319

5.1.16 Strategy matrix 324

5.2 Technical analysis (system, process, data, technology) 326

5.2.1 Architectural decomposition view 326

5.2.2 Functional decomposition 328

5.2.3 Process analysis 331

5.2.4 Interface analysis 334

5.2.5 Logical data relationship 338

5.2.6 Entity relationship diagram 340

5.2.7 Technology and systems landscape 342

5.2.8 Requirements catalogue 344

5.2.9 Logical and functional system modelling 346

5.3 Organisational analysis 348

5.3.1 Organisational structure 350

5.3.2 Diamond grading 355

5.3.3 Org structure versus process 356

5.3.4 Span of control 358

5.3.5 Organisational assessment 360

5.3.6 Powergram 361

5.3.7 Communication net 364

5.3.8 Communication matrix 366

5.3.9 Communication structures 370

6 Decision making (incl. evaluation, prioritisation) 372

6.1 Decision tree 377

6.2 Perspectives3 379

6.3 Argument balance 380

6.4 Swap sorting 382

6.5 Pair ranking 382

6.6 Cross of beliefs 384

6.7 Polarities 385

6.8 Utility analysis 387

6.9 Nominal group 389

6.10 100 Points 391

6.11 Cartesian coordinates 392

6.12 Vroom Yetton 393

6.13 Risk analysis 396

6.14 Prioritisation matrices 401

6.15 Think 360 406

6.16 Distance mapping 408

6.17 Reflections 411

7 Project management tools 413

7.1 Project management activities, tools, terms and indicators of risk 414

7.1.1 Key project management activities and tools 414

7.1.2 Brief glossary of key project management terms 417

7.1.3 Warning signs of project risks 419

7.2 Project contract 421

7.3 LogFrame 424

7.4 Project roadmap/programme 430

7.5 Work breakdown structure 432

7.6 Gantt chart 436

7.7 Project work plan 437

7.8 Project environment analysis 438

7.9 Project structure 440

7.10 Project management roles and responsibilities 442

7.11 Project communication plan 445

7.12 Accountability matrix (CIDA) 449

7.13 Stakeholder communication 451

7.14 Workshop guideline 453

7.15 Expectation review 455

7.16 Booz ball evaluation 456

7.17 Six thinking hats 457

7.18 Action steps and reviews 458

7.19 Project management skills radar 459

8 Annex A – Check Questions 463

8.1 Check questions for a project start 463

8.2 Check questions to review ideas and qualitative information 464

8.3 Check questions to define the current situation – diagnostic 464

8.4 Check questions to define goals and objectives 465

8.5 Check questions during an analysis 466

8.6 Check questions during decision making 467

8.7 Check questions for the project initiation phase 468

9 Annex B – Scenarios and tool lists 469

9.1 Author’s top 10 tools 469

9.2 Scenario: Good practice for project and problem definition 469

9.3 Project planning and definition 471

9.4 Strategic analysis 472

9.5 Org analysis and org design 473

9.6 Organisational restructuring 474

9.7 Feasibility study 474

9.8 System development 475

9.9 Strategy workshop 476

9.10 Business process improvements 477

Bibliography 478

Application areas of each tool (in alphabetic order) 484

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Author Information

NICOLAI ANDLER
ist freier Berater, Business Analyst und Business Coach sowie Partner des MC2 Institute. Er lebt in Kapstadt und berat Unternehmen und Hochschulen in Sudafrika und Mitteleuropa.

NNICOLAI ANDLER
ist Berater, Business Analyst und Business Coach; er lebt in Kapstadt und arbeitet international fur Kunden aus den Bereichen EDV, Finanzdienstleistung, Abfallwirtschaft, Marketing, Chemie, Petrochemie, Gesundheitswesen, Konsumguter und dem offentlichen Sektor. Seit 2010 ist er Partner des MC2 Institute, das sich auf Beratung, Training, E-Learning und Weiterbildung von Unternehmen, Corporate Universities und Hochschulen spezialisiert hat.
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Reviews

Prof. Dr. Tom Sommerlatte: "This book is the kind you always wanted to have and didn't think would and could ever exist: the universal field theory of problem solving."

Prof. Dr. Tom Sommerlatte: "This book is of the kind you always wanted to have and didn't think would and could ever exist: the universal field theory of problem solving."

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