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Web Programming: Building Internet Applications, 3rd Edition

May 2006, ©2006
Web Programming: Building Internet Applications, 3rd Edition (EHEP000879) cover image

Description

Web programming is about more than creating and formatting webpages and websites, though that is often a starting point for many. Using scripting languages such as JavaScript, Perl and PH,  it becomes possible to add a lot more functionality to a site.

This book teaches the essentials of working with the most important web technologies. From client development using HTML and Javascript, through to full server side applications written in ASP and Perl, the complete web system is shown. Concentrating on immediately useful code rather than theory, this is a how-to book for practical and project based courses. The broad scope covered by this book begins by creating reasonably simple webpages with HTML, then working through related document and content tagging systems such as dynamic HTML and eventually XML.

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Table of Contents

Preface xvii

Acknowledgments xxiii

1 Introduction 1

1.1 HTML, XML, and the World Wide Web 3

Exercises 13

Part I HTML 15

2 Hypertext Markup Language 17

2.1 Basic HTML 17

2.2 The Document Body 22

2.3 Text 26

2.4 Hyperlinks 31

2.5 Adding More Formatting 37

2.6 Lists 37

2.7 Using Color and Images 42

2.8 Images 43

Exercises 47

3 More HTML 50

3.1 Tables 51

3.2 Multimedia Objects 57

3.3 Frames 64

3.4 Forms – Toward Interactivity 69

3.5 The HTML Document Head in Detail 73

3.6 XHTML – An Evolutionary Markup 77

Exercises 82

Part II Stylesheets 85

4 Cascading Stylesheets 87

4.1 Introduction 87

4.2 Using Styles: Simple Examples 88

4.3 Defining Your Own Styles 93

4.4 Properties and Values in Styles 97

4.5 Stylesheets – AWorked Example 102

4.6 Formatting Blocks of Information 106

4.7 Layers 109

Exercises 119

5 Cascading Style Sheets Two 121

5.1 The Design Of CSS2 122

5.2 Styling For Paged Media 124

5.3 Using Aural Presentation 127

5.4 Counters And Numbering 131

Exercises 135

Part III JavaScript 137

6 An Introduction to JavaScript 139

6.1 What is Dynamic HTML? 140

6.2 JavaScript 141

6.3 JavaScript – The Basics 144

6.4 Variables 151

6.5 String Manipulation 158

6.6 Mathematical Functions 163

6.7 Statements 167

6.8 Operators 174

6.9 Arrays 175

6.10 Functions 188

Exercises 196

7 Objects in JavaScript 198

7.1 Data and Objects in JavaScript 198

7.2 Regular Expressions 203

7.3 Exception Handling 211

7.4 Built-in Objects 215

7.5 Cookies 225

7.6 Events 230

Exercises 235

8 Dynamic HTML with JavaScript 237

8.1 Data Validation 238

8.2 Opening a New Window 242

8.3 Messages and Confirmations 244

8.4 The Status Bar 245

8.5 Writing to a Different Frame 246

8.6 Rollover Buttons 252

8.7 Moving Images 257

8.8 Multiple Pages in a Single Download 261

8.9 A Text-only Menu System 264

8.10 Floating Logos 267

Exercises 270

Part IV Perl 273

9 Programming in Perl 5 275

9.1 Why Perl? 277

9.2 On-line Documentation 278

9.3 The Basic Perl Program 280

9.4 Scalars 283

9.5 Arrays 287

9.6 Hashes 293

9.7 Control Structures 299

9.8 Processing Text 308

9.9 Regular Expressions 319

9.10 Using Files 328

9.11 Subroutines 331

9.12 Bits and Pieces 335

Exercises 340

10 CGI Scripting 346

10.1 What is CGI? 346

10.2 Developing CGI Applications 347

10.3 Processing CGI 348

10.4 Introduction to CGI.pm 349

10.5 CGI.pm Methods 351

10.6 Creating HTML Pages Dynamically 352

10.7 Using CGI.pm – An Example 356

10.8 Adding Robustness 357

10.9 Carp 360

10.10 Cookies 361

Exercises 367

11 Building Web Applications With Perl 369

11.1 Uploading Files 371

11.2 Tracking Users With Hidden Data 376

11.3 Using Relational Databases 379

11.4 Using libwww 386

11.5 Template-based Sites With HTML::Mason 393

11.6 Creating And Manipulating Images 402

Exercises 417

Part V PHP 419

12 An Introduction to PHP 421

12.1 PHP 422

12.2 Introducing PHP 423

12.3 Including PHP in a Page 425

12.4 Data Types 429

12.5 Program Control 434

12.6 Arrays 441

12.7 User-Defined Functions 450

12.8 Built-in Functions 452

12.9 Regular Expression 464

12.10 Using Files 468

Exercises 473

13 Building Web Applications With PHP 475

13.1 Tracking Users 476

13.2 Using Databases 485

13.3 Handling XML 498

Exercises 506

Part VI Miscellany 509

14 XML: Defining Data for Web Applications 511

14.1 Basic XML 514

14.2 Document Type Definition 523

14.3 XML Schema 530

14.4 Document Object Model 533

14.5 Presenting XML 535

14.6 Handling XML with Perl 546

14.7 Using XML::Parser 550

14.8 Handling the DOM with Perl 558

Exercises 568

15 Good Design 569

15.1 Structure 571

15.2 Tables versus Frames versus . . . 572

15.3 Accessibility 577

15.4 Internationalization 581

Exercises 581

16 Protocols 583

16.1 Protocols 584

16.2 IP and TCP 585

16.3 Hypertext Transfer Protocol 588

16.4 Common Gateway Interface 592

16.5 The Document Object Model 596

16.6 Introducing The Document Object Model 598

Exercises 599

17 Case Study 601

17.1 The Plan 601

17.2 The Data 603

Part VII Appendices 607

Glossary 609

Appendix A Accessing a Database From PHP Using mysqli 613

Appendix B Accessing a Database From PHP Using Pear DB 619

Appendix C HTML Color Codes 625

Appendix D HTML Entities 630

Index 639

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Author Information

Chris Bates has been teaching a web programming course for several years to a large and diverse group of students during which he has created and refined the examples and exercises used in the book.
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New To This Edition

  • More exercises at the close of each chapter and solutions on the website
  • A more design-oriented view of CSS and styling, including examples
  • Increased coverage of PHP
  • New chapter on database design and configuration
  • Coverage of RSS feeds and web services
  • Two new case studies added
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The Wiley Advantage

  •  Multi-tool coverage of Dynamic HTML, XHTML, XML, Perl, CGI Scripts, JavaScript, and PHP avoids necessity of reading a book per application
  • Practical and hands-on guidance is always backed up by strong examples
  • Paced for students with some, but not extensive, programming experience
  • Examples are plentiful, practical and well illustrated
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Professor Reviews

'This book covers the wide variety of topics needed by our students' John Durrant, Ravensbourne College of Design

'A clear and methodical approach to web programming.' Marilyn Watson-Peck, University of Sunderland

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Instructors Resources
Wiley Instructor Companion Site
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Purchase Options
Paperback   
Web Programming: Building Internet Applications, 3rd Edition
ISBN : 978-0-470-01775-3
678 pages
May 2006, ©2006
$74.95   BUY

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