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Power Electronics: A First Course

October 2011, ©2012
Power Electronics: A First Course (EHEP002026) cover image
This book is part of a three-book series for the sequence of electric power electives taught in most large universities' Electrical Engineering departments. Advances in hybrid-electric cars and alternative energy systems, coupled with the severe environmental problems associated with hydrocarbon-based fuels, are driving renewed interest in the electric energy systems (EES) curriculum at the Undergraduate level.

Ned Mohan has been a leader in EES education and research for decades, as author of the best-selling text/reference Power Electronics with Wiley and a series of textbooks self-published under the MNPERE imprint. Mohan leads a consortium of 80+ universities working to revitalize electric power engineering education.  These texts are based on the integrated curriculum developed over nearly 15 years of research in education in this field. 

This textbook focuses on Power Electronics as one of the topics in an integrated Electric Energy Systems curriculum. It follows a top-down, systems-level approach to highlight interrelationships between the sub-fields within this curriculum, and is intended to cover both the fundamentals and practical design in a single-semester course. The author follows a building-block approach to power electronics that provides an in-depth discussion of several important topics that often omitted from conventional courses, for example, designing feedback control, power-factor-correction circuits, soft-switching, and Space-Vector PWM.

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PREFACE xiii

CHAPTER 1 POWER ELECTRONICS: AN ENABLING TECHNOLOGY 1

1.1 Introduction to Power Electronics 1

1.2 Applications and the Role of Power Electronics 2

1.3 Energy and the Environment: Role of Power Electronics in Providing Sustainable Electric Energy 4

1.4 Need for High Efficiency and High Power Density 8

1.5 Structure of Power Electronics Interface 9

1.6 Voltage-Link-Structure 11

1.7 Recent and Potential Advancements 16

References 16

Problems 17

CHAPTER 2 DESIGN OF SWITCHING POWER-POLES 21

2.1 Power Transistors and Power Diodes 21

2.2 Selection of Power Transistors 22

2.3 Selection of Power Diodes 24

2.4 Switching Characteristics and Power Losses in Power-Poles 25

2.5 Justifying Switches and Diodes as Ideal 30

2.6 Design Considerations 30

2.7 The PWM IC 33

References 33

Problems 34

Appendix 2A Diode Reverse-Recovery and Power Losses 35

CHAPTER 3 SWITCH-MODE DC-DC CONVERTERS: SWITCHING ANALYSIS, TOPOLOGY SELECTION AND DESIGN 38

3.1 DC-DC Converters 38

3.2 Switching Power-Pole in DC Steady State 38

3.3 Simplifying Assumptions 42

3.4 Common Operating Principles 43

3.5 Buck Converter Switching Analysis in DC Steady State 43

3.6 Boost Converter Switching Analysis in DC Steady State 45

3.7 Buck-Boost Converter Analysis in DC Steady State 50

3.8 Topology Selection 56

3.9 Worst-Case Design 57

3.10 Synchronous-Rectified Buck Converter for Very Low Output Voltages 57

3.11 Interleaving of Converters 58

3.12 Regulation of DC-DC Converters by PWM 58

3.13 Dynamic Average Representation of Converters in CCM 59

3.14 Bi-Directional Switching Power-Pole 61

3.15 Discontinuous-Conduction Mode (DCM) 62

References 68

Problems 68

CHAPTER 4 DESIGNING FEEDBACK CONTROLLERS IN SWITCH-MODE DC POWER SUPPLIES 74

4.1 Introduction and Objectives of Feedback Control 74

4.2 Review of Linear Control Theory 75

4.3 Linearization of Various Transfer Function Blocks 77

4.4 Feedback Controller Design in Voltage-Mode Control 83

4.5 Peak-Current Mode Control 86

4.6 Feedback Controller Design in DCM 91

References 93

Problems 93

Appendix 4A Bode Plots of Transfer Functions with Poles and Zeros 94

Appendix 4B Transfer Functions in Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM) (on accompanying website) 97

Appendix 4C Derivation of Parameters of the Controller Transfer Functions (on accompanying website: www.wiley.com/college/mohan) 97

CHAPTER 5 RECTIFICATION OF UTILITY INPUT USING DIODE RECTIFIERS 98

5.1 Introduction 98

5.2 Distortion and Power Factor 99

5.3 Classifying the “Front-End” of Power Electronic Systems 107

5.4 Diode-Rectifier Bridge “Front-Ends” 107

5.5 Means to Avoid Transient Inrush Currents at Starting 113

5.6 Front-Ends with Bi-Directional Power Flow 114

Reference 114

Problems 114

CHAPTER 6 POWER-FACTOR-CORRECTION (PFC) CIRCUITS AND DESIGNING THE FEEDBACK CONTROLLER 116

6.1 Introduction 116

6.2 Operating Principle of Single-Phase PFCs 116

6.3 Control of PFCs 119

6.4 Designing the Inner Average-Current-Control Loop 120

6.5 Designing the Outer Voltage-Control Loop 122

6.6 Example of Single-Phase PFC Systems 124

6.7 Simulation Results 125

6.8 Feedforward of the Input Voltage 125

6.9 Other Control Methods for PFCs 125

References 127

Problems 127

Appendix 6A Proving that ^Is3 ^IL2 ¼ 12 128

Appendix 6B Proving that ~vd ~iL ðsÞ ¼ 1 2 V^s Vd R=2 1 þ sðR=2ÞC 129

CHAPTER 7 MAGNETIC CIRCUIT CONCEPTS 130

7.1 Ampere-Turns and Flux 130

7.2 Inductance L 131

7.3 Faraday’s Law: Induced Voltage in a Coil Due to Time-Rate of Change of Flux Linkage 133

7.4 Leakage and Magnetizing Inductances 134

7.5 Transformers 136

Reference 139

Problems 139

CHAPTER 8 SWITCH-MODE DC POWER SUPPLIES 141

8.1 Applications of Switch-Mode DC Power Supplies 141

8.2 Need for Electrical Isolation 142

8.3 Classification of Transformer-Isolated DC-DC Converters 142

8.4 Flyback Converters 142

8.5 Forward Converters 145

8.6 Full-Bridge Converters 148

8.7 Half-Bridge and Push-Pull Converters 152

8.8 Practical Considerations 152

Reference 152

Problems 153

CHAPTER 9 DESIGN OF HIGH-FREQUENCY INDUCTORS AND TRANSFORMERS 155

9.1 Introduction 155

9.2 Basics of Magnetic Design 155

9.3 Inductor and Transformer Construction 156

9.4 Area-Product Method 156

9.5 Design Example of an Inductor 159

9.6 Design Example of a Transformer for a Forward Converter 161

9.7 Thermal Considerations 161

References 161

Problems 162

CHAPTER 10 SOFT-SWITCHING IN DC-DC CONVERTERS AND CONVERTERS FOR INDUCTION HEATING AND COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS 163

10.1 Introduction 163

10.2 Hard-Switching in Switching Power-Poles 163

10.3 Soft-Switching in Switching Power-Poles 165

10.4 Inverters for Induction Heating and Compact Fluorescent Lamps 169

References 170

Problems 170

CHAPTER 11 APPLICATIONS OF SWITCH-MODE POWER ELECTRONICS IN MOTOR DRIVES, UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER SUPPLIES, AND POWER SYSTEMS 172

11.1 Introduction 172

11.2 Electric Motor Drives 172

11.3 Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) 184

11.4 Utility Applications of Switch-Mode Power Electronics 185

References 187

Problems 187

CHAPTER 12 SYNTHESIS OF DC AND LOW-FREQUENCY SINUSOIDAL AC VOLTAGES FOR MOTOR DRIVES, UPS AND POWER SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS 189

12.1 Introduction 189

12.2 Bi-Directional Switching Power-Pole as the Building-Block 190

12.3 Converters for DC Motor Drives (2Vd , vo , Vd ) 194

12.4 Synthesis of Low-Frequency AC 200

12.5 Single-Phase Inverters 201

12.6 Three-Phase Inverters 204

12.7 Multilevel Inverters 212

12.8 Converters for Bi-Directional Power Flow 213

12.9 Matrix Converters (Direct Link System) 214

References 221

Problems 221

Appendix 12A Space Vector Pulse-Width-Modulation (SV-PWM) 223

CHAPTER 13 THYRISTOR CONVERTERS 230

13.1 Introduction 230

13.2 Thyristors (SCRs) 230

13.3 Single-Phase, Phase-Controlled Thyristor Converters 232

13.4 Three-Phase, Full-Bridge Thyristor Converters 237

13.5 Current-Link Systems 243

Reference 244

Problems 245

CHAPTER 14 UTILITY APPLICATIONS OF POWER ELECTRONICS 247

14.1 Introduction 247

14.2 Power Semiconductor Devices and Their Capabilities 248

14.3 Categorizing Power Electronic Systems 248

14.4 Distributed Generation (DG) Applications 250

14.5 Power Electronic Loads 255

14.6 Power Quality Solutions 255

14.7 Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Applications 257

References 261

Problems 261

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  • Concise, balanced and fundamentals-based  coverage of a broad range of topics
  • Designed for undergraduates for industry and/or graduate research
  • Updated with modern application examples relevant to renewable energy and the ‘smart grid'
  • Supplemented with a wide range of digital resources -- slides, video clips, software-based laboratory exercises and the lab manual
  • Adopts a systems approach, which puts otherwise dry technical detail in the context of applications that motivate students (energy efficiency, hybrid cars, wind turbines, photovoltaics, etc.)
  • Briefer and more suitable for an undergraduate audience
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Purchase Options
Wiley E-Text   
Power Electronics: A First Course
ISBN : 978-1-118-21526-5
288 pages
November 2011, ©2012
$62.50   BUY

Hardcover   
Power Electronics: A First Course
ISBN : 978-1-118-07480-0
288 pages
October 2011, ©2012
$152.95   BUY

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