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Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition

Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition (EHEP003170) cover image

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Updated with the latest advances in the field, Jerry FitzGerald, Alan Dennis, and Alexandra Durcikova’s 12th Edition of Business Data Communications and Networking, continues to provide the fundamental concepts and cutting-edge coverage of applications that students need to succeed in their careers.

Authors FitzGerald, Dennis, and Durcikova have developed a foundation and balanced presentation from which new technologies and applications can be easily understood, evaluated, and compared.

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Table of Contents

About the Authors iii

Preface v

PART ONE

INTRODUCTION 1

Chapter 1

Introduction to Data

Communications 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Data Communications Networks 4

1.2.1 Components of a Network 4

1.2.2 Types of Networks 6

1.3 Network Models 7

1.3.1 Open Systems Interconnection

Reference Model 8

1.3.2 Internet Model 9

1.3.3 Message Transmission Using

Layers 10

1.4 Network Standards 13

1.4.1 The Importance of Standards 13

1.4.2 The Standards-Making Process 13

1.4.3 Common Standards 16

1.5 Future Trends 16

1.5.1 Wireless LAN and BYOD 16

1.5.2 TheWeb ofThings 17

1.5.3 Massively Online 17

1.6 Implications for Management 18

PART TWO

FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS 26

Chapter 2

Application Layer 26

2.1 Introduction 26

2.2 Application Architectures 27

2.2.1 Host-Based Architectures 28

2.2.2 Client-Based Architectures 28

2.2.3 Client-Server Architectures 29

2.2.4 Cloud Computing Architectures 32

2.2.5 Peer-to-Peer Architectures 34

2.2.6 Choosing Architectures 35

2.3 WorldWideWeb 36

2.3.1 How theWebWorks 36

2.3.2 Inside an HTTP Request 37

2.3.3 Inside an HTTP Response 38

2.4 Electronic Mail 39

2.4.1 How EmailWorks 40

2.4.2 Inside an SMTP Packet 43

2.4.3 Attachments in Multipurpose Internet

Mail Extension 43

2.5 Other Applications 44

2.5.1 Telnet 44

2.5.2 Instant Messaging 45

2.5.3 Videoconferencing 46

2.6 Implications for Management 48

Chapter 3

Physical Layer 60

3.1 Introduction 60

3.2 Circuits 62

3.2.1Circuit Configuration 62

3.2.2 Data Flow 63

3.2.3 Multiplexing 64

3.3 CommunicationMedia 66

3.3.1 Twisted Pair Cable 66

3.3.2 Coaxial Cable 67

3.3.3 Fiber-Optic Cable 67

3.3.4 Radio 69

3.3.5 Microwave 69

3.3.6 Satellite 70

3.3.7 Media Selection 71

3.4 Digital Transmission of Digital Data 72

3.4.1 Coding 72

3.4.2 Transmission Modes 73

3.4.3 Digital Transmission 74

3.4.4 How Ethernet Transmits Data 75

3.5 Analog Transmission of Digital Data 76

3.5.1 Modulation 77

3.5.2 Capacity of a Circuit 79

3.5.3 How Modems Transmit Data 80

3.6 Digital Transmission of Analog Data 80

3.6.1 Translating from Analog to

Digital 80

3.6.2 How Telephones Transmit Voice

Data 81

3.6.3 How Instant Messenger Transmits

Voice Data 83

3.6.4 Voice over Internet Protocol

(VoIP) 83

3.7 Implications for Management 84

Chapter 4

Data Link Layer 92

4.1 Introduction 92

4.2 Media Access Control 93

4.2.1 Contention 93

4.2.2 Controlled Access 93

4.2.3 Relative Performance 94

4.3 Error Control 95

4.3.1 Sources of Errors 96

4.3.2 Error Prevention 97

4.3.3 Error Detection 98

4.3.4 Error Correction via

Retransmission 99

4.3.5 Forward Error Correction 102

4.3.6 Error Control in Practice 102

4.4 Data Link Protocols 103

4.4.1 Asynchronous Transmission 103

4.4.2 Synchronous Transmission 104

4.5 Transmission Efficiency 107

4.6 Implications for Management 109

Chapter 5

Network and Transport Layers

116

5.1 Introduction 116

5.2 Transport and Network Layer Protocols 118

5.2.1 Transmission Control Protocol

(TCP) 118

5.2.2 Internet Protocol (IP) 119

5.3 Transport Layer Functions 120

5.3.1 Linking to the Application Layer 120

5.3.2 Segmenting 121

5.3.3 Session Management 122

5.4 Addressing 124

5.4.1 Assigning Addresses 124

5.4.2 Address Resolution 130

5.5 Routing 132

5.5.1 Types of Routing 134

5.5.2 Routing Protocols 135

5.5.3 Multicasting 137

5.5.4 The Anatomy of a Router 138

5.6 TCP/IP Example 140

5.6.1 Known Addresses, Same Subnet 140

5.6.2 Known Addresses, Different

Subnet 143

5.6.3 Unknown Addresses 144

5.6.4 TCP Connections 144

5.6.5 TCP/IP and Network Layers 145

5.7 Implications for Management 147

PART THREE

NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES

166

Chapter 6

Network Design 166

6.1 Introduction 166

6.1.1 Network Architecture

Components 166

6.1.2 The Traditional Network Design

Process 168

6.1.3 The Building-Block Network Design

Process 169

6.2 Needs Analysis 171

6.2.1 Network Architecture

Component 172

6.2.2 Application Systems 173

6.2.3 Network Users 173

6.2.4 Categorizing Network Needs 173

6.2.5 Deliverables 174

6.3 Technology Design 175

6.3.1 Designing Clients and Servers 175

6.3.2 Designing Circuits 175

6.3.3 Network Design Tools 177

6.3.4 Deliverables 178

6.4 Cost Assessment 178

6.4.1 Request for Proposal 178

6.4.2 Selling the Proposal to

Management 179

6.4.3 Deliverables 180

6.5 Implications for Management 180

Chapter 7

Wired and Wireless Local Area

Networks 184

7.1 Introduction 184

7.2 LAN Components 185

7.2.1 Network Interface Cards 186

7.2.2 Network Circuits 186

7.2.3 Network Hubs, Switches, and Access

Points 187

7.2.4 Network Operating Systems 190

7.3 Wired Ethernet 191

7.3.1 Topology 191

7.3.2 Media Access Control 194

7.3.3 Types of Ethernet 195

7.4 Wireless Ethernet 196

7.4.1 Topology 196

7.4.2 Media Access Control 196

7.4.3 Wireless Ethernet Frame Layout 197

7.4.4 Types ofWireless Ethernet 198

7.4.5 Security 199

7.5 The Best Practice LAN Design 201

7.5.1 Designing User Access withWired

Ethernet 202

7.5.2 Designing User Access withWireless

Ethernet 202

7.5.3 Designing the Data Center 204

7.5.4 Designing the e-Commerce

Edge 206

7.5.5 Designing the SOHO

Environment 207

7.6 Improving LAN Performance 208

7.6.1 Improving Server Performance 209

7.6.2 Improving Circuit Capacity 210

7.6.3 Reducing Network Demand 211

7.7 Implications for Management 211

Chapter 8

Backbone Networks 222

8.1 Introduction 222

8.2 Switched Backbones 223

8.3 Routed Backbones 226

8.4 Virtual LANs 229

8.5 The Best Practice Backbone Design 234

8.6 Improving Backbone Performance 236

8.6.1 Improving Device Performance 236

8.6.2Improving Circuit Capacity 236

8.6.3 Reducing Network Demand 236

8.7 Implications for Management 237

Chapter 9

Wide Area Networks 245

9.1 Introduction 245

9.2 Dedicated-Circuit Networks 246

9.2.1 Basic Architecture 246

9.2.2 T Carrier Services 249

9.2.3 SONET Services 251

9.3 Packet-Switched Networks 251

9.3.1 Basic Architecture 252

9.3.2 Frame Relay Services 253

9.3.3 Ethernet Services 254

9.3.4 MPLS Services 255

9.3.5 IP Services 256

9.4 Virtual Private Networks 257

9.4.1 Basic Architecture 257

9.4.2 VPN Types 258

9.4.3 How VPNsWork 258

9.5 The Best PracticeWAN Design 261

9.6 ImprovingWAN Performance 262

9.6.1 Improving Device Performance 262

9.6.2 Improving Circuit Capacity 263

9.6.3 Reducing Network Demand 263

9.7 Implications for Management 264

Chapter 10

The Internet 276

10.1 Introduction 276

10.2 How the InternetWorks 277

10.2.1 Basic Architecture 277

10.2.2 Connecting to an ISP 279

10.2.3 The Internet Today 280

10.3 Internet Access Technologies 281

10.3.1 Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) 281

10.3.2 Cable Modem 283

10.3.3 Fiber to the Home 285

10.3.4 WiMax 285

10.4 The Future of the Internet 286

10.4.1 Internet Governance 286

10.4.2 Building the Future 287

10.5 Implications for Management 289

PART FOUR

NETWORK MANAGEMENT 296

Chapter 11

Network Security 296

11.1 Introduction 296

11.1.1 Why Networks Need Security 298

11.1.2 Types of SecurityThreats 298

11.1.3 Network Controls 300

11.2 Risk Assessment 301

11.2.1 Develop risk measurement

criteria 301

11.2.2 Inventory IT assets 302

11.2.3 Identify Threats 304

11.2.4 Document Existing Controls 307

11.2.5 Identify Improvements 308

11.3Ensuring Business Continuity 308

11.3.1 Virus Protection 309

11.3.2 Denial of Service Protection 310

11.3.3 Theft Protection 313

11.3.4 Device Failure Protection 313

11.3.5 Disaster Protection 314

11.4 Intrusion Prevention 318

11.4.1 Security Policy 319

11.4.2Perimeter Security and

Firewalls 319

11.4.3 Server and Client Protection 325

11.4.4 Encryption 329

11.4.5 User Authentication 335

11.4.6 Preventing Social Engineering 338

11.4.7 Intrusion Prevention Systems 339

11.4.8 Intrusion Recovery 341

11.5 Best Practice Recommendations 342

11.6 Implications for Management 344

Chapter 12

Network Management 353

12.1 Introduction 353

12.2 Designing for Network Performance 355

12.2.1 Managed Networks 355

12.2.2 Managing Network Traffic 359

12.2.3 Reducing Network Traffic 360

12.3 Configuration Management 363

12.3.1 Configuring the Network and Client

Computers 363

12.3.2 Documenting the Configuration 364

12.4 Performance and Fault Management 366

12.4.1 Network Monitoring 366

12.4.2 Failure Control Function 368

12.4.3 Performance and Failure

Statistics 370

12.4.4 Improving Performance 373

12.5 End User Support 373

12.5.1 Resolving Problems 373

12.5.2 Providing End User Training 375

12.6 Cost Management 375

12.6.1 Sources of Costs 375

12.6.2 Reducing Costs 378

12.7 Implications for Management 380

Appendices (Online)

Glossary (Online)

Index 389

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New To This Edition

  • Design of Networks:  A comprehensive framework is introduced for network design in Chapter 6 that is supported by an ongoing case study at the ends of Chapters 6–10 which walks the students through network design step by step.

  • Chapters 6–12 are designed in a way that can be used for a “flipped classroom” style of teaching as well as the traditional lecture approach. Students are motivated to learn about LANs and WLANs (Chapter 7), BNs (Chapter 8), WANs (Chapter 9), and the Internet (Chapter 10) because they are designing a network for an organization.

  • There is an introduction of a new framework for risk assessment that builds on currently accepted industry standards. It walks students through risk assessment in an easily comprehensible way.

  • New hands-on activities and questions have been added at the end of each chapter that guide students to understand how to select technologies to build a network that would support an organization’s business needs.
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The Wiley Advantage

  • Balanced coverage of the technical and managerial aspects of data communications helps students understand how networks operate and how to successfully apply them.
  • Real-life examples throughout the text illustrate the complex uses of networks in recent years including mini-cases in Management Focus boxes which show how real organizations are using telecommunications and networking.
  • The text covers all the important topics in data communications. Every important technology and/or network management issue is addressed in enough depth to give the student a basic understanding.
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Instructors Resources
Wiley Instructor Companion Site
Instructor's Solutions Manual
Contains detailed solutions to all questions, exercises, and problems in the textbook.
PowerPoint Presentations
Our PowerPoint presentations contain a combination of key concepts allowing you to illustrate important topics with images, figures, and problems from the textbook.
Test Bank
Test your students' comprehension with this digital collection of fill-in-the-blank, multiple-choice, true/false, and free-response questions.
Networking Labs
These are hands-on exercises to be used in a networking lab, covering topics such as configuring routers and servers.
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Students Resources
Wiley Student Companion Site
Networking Labs
These are hands-on exercises to be used in a networking lab, covering topics such as configuring routers and servers.
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Purchase Options
Wiley E-Text   
Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition
ISBN : 978-1-118-93646-7
416 pages
August 2014, ©2014
$64.00   BUY

Paperback   
Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition
ISBN : 978-1-118-89168-1
416 pages
August 2014, ©2014
$177.95   BUY

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