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Design of Reinforced Concrete, 10th Edition

September 2015, ©2016
Design of Reinforced Concrete, 10th Edition (EHEP003418) cover image

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Design of Reinforced Concrete, 10th Edition by Jack McCormac and Russell Brown, introduces the fundamentals of reinforced concrete design in a clear and comprehensive manner and grounded in the basic principles of mechanics of solids. Students build on their understanding of basic mechanics to learn new concepts such as compressive stress and strain in concrete, while applying current ACI Code.

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Table of Contents

Preface xv

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Concrete and Reinforced Concrete 1

1.2 Advantages of Reinforced Concrete as a Structural Material 1

1.3 Disadvantages of Reinforced Concrete as a Structural Material 2

1.4 Historical Background 3

1.5 Comparison of Reinforced Concrete and Structural Steel for Buildings and Bridges 5

1.6 Compatibility of Concrete and Steel 6

1.7 Design Codes 6

1.8 SI Units and Shaded Areas 7

1.9 Types of Portland Cement 7

1.10 Admixtures 9

1.11 Properties of Concrete 10

1.12 Aggregate 18

1.13 High-Strength Concretes 19

1.14 Fiber-Reinforced Concretes 20

1.15 Concrete Durability 21

1.16 Reinforcing Steel 22

1.17 Grades of Reinforcing Steel 24

1.18 SI Bar Sizes and Material Strengths 25

1.19 Corrosive Environments 26

1.20 Identifying Marks on Reinforcing Bars 26

1.21 Introduction to Loads 28

1.22 Dead Loads 28

1.23 Live Loads 29

1.24 Environmental Loads 30

1.25 Selection of Design Loads 32

1.26 Calculation Accuracy33

1.27 Impact of Computers on Reinforced Concrete Design 34

Problems 34

2 Flexural Analysis of Beams 35

2.1 Introduction 35

2.2 Cracking Moment 38

2.3 Elastic Stresses—Concrete Cracked 41

2.4 Ultimate or Nominal Flexural Moments 48

2.5 SI Example 51

2.6 Computer Examples 52

Problems 54

3 Strength Analysis of Beams According to ACI Code 65

3.1 Design Methods 65

3.2 Advantages of Strength Design 66

3.3 Structural Safety 66

3.4 Derivation of Beam Expressions 67

3.5 Strains in Flexural Members, 70

3.6 Balanced Sections, Tension-Controlled Sections, and Compression-Controlled or Brittle Sections 71

3.7 Strength Reduction or φ Factors 71

3.8 Minimum Percentage of Steel 74

3.9 Balanced Steel Percentage 75

3.10 Example Problems 76

3.11 Computer Examples 79

Problems 80

4 Design of Rectangular Beams and One-Way Slabs 82

4.1 Load Factors 82

4.2 Design of Rectangular Beams 85

4.3 Beam Design Examples 89

4.4 Miscellaneous Beam Considerations 95

4.5 Determining Steel Area When Beam Dimensions Are Predetermined 96

4.6 Bundled Bars 98

4.7 One-Way Slabs 99

4.8 Cantilever Beams and Continuous Beams 102

4.9 SI Example 103

4.10 Computer Example 105

Problems 106

5 Analysis and Design of T Beams and Doubly Reinforced Beams 112

5.1 T Beams 112

5.2 Analysis of T Beams 114

5.3 Another Method for Analyzing T Beams 118

5.4 Design of T Beams 120

5.5 Design of T Beams for Negative Moments 125

5.6 L-Shaped Beams 127

5.7 Compression Steel 127

5.8 Design of Doubly Reinforced Beams 132

5.9 SI Examples 136

5.10 Computer Examples, 138

Problems 143

6 Serviceability 154

6.1 Introduction 154

6.2 Importance of Deflections 154

6.3 Control of Deflections 155

6.4 Calculation of Deflections 157

6.5 Effective Moments of Inertia 158

6.6 Long-Term Deflections 160

6.7 Simple-Beam Deflections 162

6.8 Continuous-Beam Deflections 164

6.9 Types of Cracks 170

6.10 Control of Flexural Cracks 171

6.11 ACI Code Provisions Concerning Cracks 175

6.12 Miscellaneous Cracks 176

6.13 SI Example 176

6.14 Computer Example 177

Problems 179

7 Bond, Development Lengths, and Splices 184

7.1 Cutting Off or Bending Bars 184

7.2 Bond Stresses 187

7.3 Development Lengths for Tension Reinforcing 189

7.4 Development Lengths for Bundled Bars 197

7.5 Hooks 199

7.6 Development Lengths for Welded Wire Fabric in Tension 203

7.7 Development Lengths for Compression Bars 204

7.8 Critical Sections for Development Length 206

7.9 Effect of Combined Shear and Moment on Development Lengths 206

7.10 Effect of Shape of Moment Diagram on Development Lengths 207

7.11 Cutting Off or Bending Bars (Continued) 208

7.12 Bar Splices in Flexural Members 211

7.13 Tension Splices 213

7.14 Compression Splices 213

7.15 Headed and Mechanically Anchored Bars 214

7.16 SI Example 215

7.17 Computer Example 216

Problems 217

8 Shear and Diagonal Tension 223

8.1 Introduction 223

8.2 Shear Stresses in Concrete Beams 223

8.3 Lightweight Concrete 224

8.4 Shear Strength of Concrete 225

8.5 Shear Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams 226

8.6 Web Reinforcement 227

8.7 Behavior of Beams with Web Reinforcement 229

8.8 Design for Shear 231

8.9 ACI Code Requirements 232

8.10 Shear Design Example Problems 237

8.11 Economical Spacing of Stirrups 247

8.12 Shear Friction and Corbels 249

8.13 Shear Strength of Members Subjected to Axial Forces 251

8.14 Shear Design Provisions for Deep Beams 253

8.15 Introductory Comments on Torsion 254

8.16 SI Example 256

8.17 Computer Example 257

Problems 258

9 Introduction to Columns 263

9.1 General 263

9.2 Types of Columns 264

9.3 Axial Load Capacity of Columns 266

9.4 Failure of Tied and Spiral Columns 266

9.5 Code Requirements for Cast-in-Place Columns 269

9.6 Safety Provisions for Columns 271

9.7 Design Formulas 272

9.8 Comments on Economical Column Design 273

9.9 Design of Axially Loaded Columns 274

9.10 SI Example 277

9.11 Computer Example 278

Problems 279

10 Design of Short Columns Subject to Axial Load and Bending 281

10.1 Axial Load and Bending 281

10.2 The Plastic Centroid 282

10.3 Development of Interaction Diagrams 284

10.4 Use of Interaction Diagrams 290

10.5 Code Modifications of Column Interaction Diagrams 292

10.6 Design and Analysis of Eccentrically Loaded Columns Using Interaction Diagrams 294

10.7 Shear in Columns 301

10.8 Biaxial Bending 302

10.9 Design of Biaxially Loaded Columns 306

10.10 Continued Discussion of Capacity Reduction Factors, φ 309

10.11 Computer Example 311

Problems 312

11 Slender Columns 317

11.1 Introduction 317

11.2 Nonsway and Sway Frames 317

11.3 Slenderness Effects 318

11.4 Determining k Factors with Alignment Charts 321

11.5 Determining k Factors with Equations 322

11.6 First-Order Analyses Using Special Member Properties 323

11.7 Slender Columns in Nonsway and Sway Frames 324

11.8 ACI Code Treatments of Slenderness Effects 328

11.9 Magnification of Column Moments in Nonsway Frames 328

11.10 Magnification of Column Moments in Sway Frames 333

11.11 Analysis of Sway Frames 336

11.12 Computer Examples 342

Problems 344

12 Footings 347

12.1 Introduction 347

12.2 Types of Footings 347

12.3 Actual Soil Pressures 350

12.4 Allowable Soil Pressures 351

12.5 Design of Wall Footings 352

12.6 Design of Square Isolated Footings 357

12.7 Footings Supporting Round or Regular Polygon-Shaped Columns 364

12.8 Load Transfer from Columns to Footings 364

12.9 Rectangular Isolated Footings 369

12.10 Combined Footings 372

12.11 Footing Design for Equal Settlements 378

12.12 Footings Subjected to Axial Loads and Moments 380

12.13 Transfer of Horizontal Forces 382

12.14 Plain Concrete Footings 383

12.15 SI Example 386

12.16 Computer Examples 388

Problems 391

13 Retaining Walls 394

13.1 Introduction 394

13.2 Types of Retaining Walls 394

13.3 Drainage 397

13.4 Failures of Retaining Walls 398

13.5 Lateral Pressure on Retaining Walls 399

13.6 Footing Soil Pressures 404

13.7 Design of Semigravity Retaining Walls 405

13.8 Effect of Surcharge 408

13.9 Estimating the Sizes of Cantilever Retaining Walls 409

13.10 Design Procedure for Cantilever Retaining Walls 413

13.11 Cracks and Wall Joints 424

Problems 426

14 Continuous Reinforced Concrete Structures 431

14.1 Introduction 431

14.2 General Discussion of Analysis Methods 431

14.3 Qualitative Influence Lines 431

14.4 Limit Design 434

14.5 Limit Design under the ACI Code 442

14.6 Preliminary Design of Members 445

14.7 Approximate Analysis of Continuous Frames for Vertical Loads 445

14.8 Approximate Analysis of Continuous Frames for Lateral Loads 454

14.9 Computer Analysis of Building Frames 458

14.10 Lateral Bracing for Buildings 459

14.11 Development Length Requirements for Continuous Members 459

Problems 465

15 Torsion 470

15.1 Introduction 470

15.2 Torsional Reinforcing 471

15.3 Torsional Moments that Have to Be Considered in Design 474

15.4 Torsional Stresses 475

15.5 When Torsional Reinforcing Is Required by the ACI 476

15.6 Torsional Moment Strength 477

15.7 Design of Torsional Reinforcing 478

15.8 Additional ACI Requirements 479

15.9 Example Problems Using U.S. Customary Units 480

15.10 SI Equations and Example Problem 483

15.11 Computer Example 487

Problems 488

16 Two-Way Slabs, Direct Design Method 492

16.1 Introduction 492

16.2 Analysis of Two-Way Slabs 495

16.3 Design of Two-Way Slabs by the ACI Code 495

16.4 Column and Middle Strips 496

16.5 Shear Resistance of Slabs 497

16.6 Depth Limitations and Stiffness Requirements 500

16.7 Limitations of Direct Design Method 505

16.8 Distribution of Moments in Slabs 506

16.9 Design of an Interior Flat Plate 511

16.10 Placing of Live Loads 514

16.11 Analysis of Two-Way Slabs with Beams 517

16.12 Transfer of Moments and Shears between Slabs and Columns 522

16.13 Openings in Slab Systems 528

16.14 Computer Example 528

Problems 530

17 Two-Way Slabs, Equivalent Frame Method 532

17.1 Moment Distribution for Nonprismatic Members 532

17.2 Introduction to the Equivalent Frame Method 533

17.3 Properties of Slab Beams 535

17.4 Properties of Columns 538

17.5 Example Problem 540

17.6 Computer Analysis 544

17.7 Computer Example 545

Problems 546

18 Walls 547

18.1 Introduction 547

18.2 Non–Load-Bearing Walls 547

18.3 Load-Bearing Concrete Walls—Empirical Design Method 549

18.4 Load-Bearing Concrete Walls—Rational Design 552

18.5 Shear Walls 554

18.6 ACI Provisions for Shear Walls 558

18.7 Economy in Wall Construction 563

18.8 Computer Example 564

Problems 565

19 Prestressed Concrete 567

19.1 Introduction 567

19.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of Prestressed Concrete 569

19.3 Pretensioning and Posttensioning 569

19.4 Materials Used for Prestressed Concrete 570

19.5 Stress Calculations 572

19.6 Shapes of Prestressed Sections 576

19.7 Prestress Losses 579

19.8 Ultimate Strength of Prestressed Sections 582

19.9 Deflections 586

19.10 Shear in Prestressed Sections 590

19.11 Design of Shear Reinforcement 591

19.12 Additional Topics 595

19.13 Computer Example 597

Problems 598

20 Reinforced Concrete Masonry 602

20.1 Introduction 602

20.2 Masonry Materials 602

20.3 Specified Compressive Strength of Masonry 606

20.4 Maximum Flexural Tensile Reinforcement 607

20.5 Walls with Out-of-Plane Loads—Non–Load-Bearing Walls 607

20.6 Masonry Lintels 611

20.7 Walls with Out-of-Plane Loads—Load-Bearing 616

20.8 Walls with In-Plane Loading—Shear Walls 623

20.9 Computer Example 628

Problems 630

A Tables and Graphs: U.S. Customary Units 631

B Tables in SI Units 669

C The Strut-and-Tie Method of Design 675

C.1 Introduction 675

C.2 Deep Beams 675

C.3 Shear Span and Behavior Regions 675

C.4 Truss Analogy 677

C.5 Definitions 678

C.6 ACI Code Requirements for Strut-and-Tie Design 678

C.7 Selecting a Truss Model 679

C.8 Angles of Struts in Truss Models 681

C.9 Design Procedure 682

D Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 683

D.1 Introduction 683

D.2 Maximum Considered Earthquake 684

D.3 Soil Site Class 684

D.4 Risk and Importance Factors 686

D.5 Seismic Design Categories 687

D.6 Seismic Design Loads 687

D.7 Detailing Requirements for Different Classes of Reinforced Concrete Moment Frames 691

Problems 698

Glossary 699

Index 703

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New To This Edition

  • Updated Code. With the tenth edition of this text, the contents have been updated to conform to the 2014 Building Code of the American Concrete Institute (ACI 318-14). Changes to this edition of the code are discussed in Section 1.7 of the text under the heading Summary of 2014 ACI Code Changes.
  • Chapter on Concrete Masonry Updated to ACI 530-13 Code. The new chapter on strength design of reinforced concrete masonry that was added to the ninth edition of the text has been updated to conform to the 2013 issue of ACI 530.
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The Wiley Advantage

  • Grounded in the basic principles of mechanics of solids, so that students build on their understanding of mechanics to learn the new concepts of reinforced concrete design.
  • Updated content, examples, and problems in accordance with code ACI 318-14.
  • Excel Spreadsheets: Use of Excel spreadsheets for examples provides the student and instructor with tools to analyze and design reinforced concrete elements quickly as well as compare alternative solutions.
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Instructors Resources
Wiley Instructor Companion Site
Solutions Manual
Contains complete solutions for all homework problems in the text.
PowerPoint Presentations
Our PowerPoint™ presentations, developed by Dr. Terry Weigel of the University of Louisville, contain a combination of key concepts allowing you to illustrate important topics with images, figures, and problems from the textbook.
Sample Exams
Examples of sample exams are included for most topics in the text.
Course Syllabus
A course syllabus along with a typical daily schedule is included in editable format
Excel Spreadsheets
Provide the student and the instructor with tools to analyze and design reinforced concrete elements quickly to compare alternative solutions.
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Students Resources
Wiley Student Companion Site
Excel Spreadsheets
Provide the student and the instructor with tools to analyze and design reinforced concrete elements quickly to compare alternative solutions.
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Purchase Options
Wiley E-Text   
Design of Reinforced Concrete, 10th Edition
ISBN : 978-1-118-87893-4
672 pages
September 2015, ©2016
$64.00   BUY

Hardcover   
Design of Reinforced Concrete, 10th Edition
ISBN : 978-1-118-87910-8
672 pages
September 2015, ©2016
$239.95   BUY

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