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Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, 5e

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This text is an unbound, three hole punched version.

Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, Binder Ready Version, 5th Edition 
takes an integrated approach to the sequence of topics – one specific structure, characteristic, or property type is covered in turn for all three basic material types: metals, ceramics, and polymeric materials. This presentation permits the early introduction of non-metals and supports the engineer's role in choosing materials based upon their characteristics. Using clear, concise terminology that is familiar to students, Fundamentals presents material at an appropriate level for both student comprehension and instructors who may not have a materials background. This text is an unbound, three hole punched version. Access to WileyPLUS sold separately.
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Table of Contents

LIST OF SYMBOLS xxiii

1. Introduction 1

Learning Objectives 2

1.1 Historical Perspective 2

1.2 Materials Science and Engineering 2

1.3 Why Study Materials Science and Engineering? 4

Case Study—Liberty Ship Failures 5

1.4 Classification of Materials 6

Case Study—Carbonated Beverage Containers 11

1.5 Advanced Materials 12

1.6 Modern Materials’ Needs 14

Summary 15

References 15

Questions 16

2. Atomic Structure and Interatomic Bonding 17

Learning Objectives 18

2.1 Introduction 18

ATOMIC STRUCTURE 18

2.2 Fundamental Concepts 18

2.3 Electrons in Atoms 20

2.4 The Periodic Table 26

ATOMIC BONDING IN SOLIDS 28

2.5 Bonding Forces and Energies 28

2.6 Primary Interatomic Bonds 30

2.7 Secondary Bonding or van der Waals Bonding 37

Materials of Importance—Water (Its Volume Expansion upon Freezing) 40

2.8 Mixed Bonding 41

2.9 Molecules 42

2.10 Bonding Type-Material Classification Correlations 42

Summary 43

Equation Summary 44

List of Symbols 44

Important Terms and Concepts 45

References 45

Questions and Problems 45

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 47

3. Structures of Metals and Ceramics 48

Learning Objectives 49

3.1 Introduction 49

CRYSTAL STRUCTURES 49

3.2 Fundamental Concepts 49

3.3 Unit Cells 50

3.4 Metallic Crystal Structures 51

3.5 Density Computations—Metals 57

3.6 Ceramic Crystal Structures 57

3.7 Density Computations—Ceramics 63

3.8 Silicate Ceramics 64

3.9 Carbon 68

3.10 Polymorphism and Allotropy 69

3.11 Crystal Systems 69

Material of Importance—Tin (Its Allotropic Transformation) 71

CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC POINTS, DIRECTIONS, AND PLANES 72

3.12 Point Coordinates 72

3.13 Crystallographic Directions 75

3.14 Crystallographic Planes 81

3.15 Linear and Planar Densities 87

3.16 Close-Packed Crystal Structures 88

CRYSTALLINE AND NONCRYSTALLINE MATERIALS 92

3.17 Single Crystals 92

3.18 Polycrystalline Materials 92

3.19 Anisotropy 92

3.20 X-Ray Diffraction: Determination of Crystal Structures 94

3.21 Noncrystalline Solids 99

Summary 101

Equation Summary 103

List of Symbols 104

Important Terms and Concepts 105

References 105

Questions and Problems 105

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 114

4. Polymer Structures 115

Learning Objectives 116

4.1 Introduction 116

4.2 Hydrocarbon Molecules 116

4.3 Polymer Molecules 119

4.4 The Chemistry of Polymer Molecules 119

4.5 Molecular Weight 123

4.6 Molecular Shape 126

4.7 Molecular Structure 128

4.8 Molecular Configurations 129

4.9 Thermoplastic and Thermosetting Polymers 132

4.10 Copolymers 133

4.11 Polymer Crystallinity 134

4.12 Polymer Crystals 138

Summary 140

Equation Summary 141

List of Symbols 142

Important Terms and Concepts 142

References 142

Questions and Problems 143

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 145

5. Imperfections in Solids 146

Learning Objectives 147

5.1 Introduction 147

POINT DEFECTS 148

5.2 Point Defects in Metals 148

5.3 Point Defects in Ceramics 149

5.4 Impurities in Solids 152

5.5 Point Defects in Polymers 157

5.6 Specification of Composition 157

MISCELLANEOUS IMPERFECTIONS 161

5.7 Dislocations—Linear Defects 161

5.8 Interfacial Defects 164

5.9 Bulk or Volume Defects 167

5.10 Atomic Vibrations 167

Materials of Importance—Catalysts (and Surface Defects) 168

MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION 169

5.11 Basic Concepts of Microscopy 169

5.12 Microscopic Techniques 170

5.13 Grain-Size Determination 174

Summary 177

Equation Summary 179

List of Symbols 180

Important Terms and Concepts 180

References 180

Questions and Problems 180

Design Problems 184

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 185

6. Diffusion 186

Learning Objectives 187

6.1 Introduction 187

6.2 Diffusion Mechanisms 188

6.3 Fick’s First Law 189

6.4 Fick’s Second Law—Nonsteady-State Diffusion 191

6.5 Factors that Influence Diffusion 195

6.6 Diffusion in Semiconducting Materials 200

Materials of Importance—Aluminum for Integrated Circuit Interconnects 203

6.7 Other Diffusion Paths 204

6.8 Diffusion in Ionic and Polymeric Materials 204

Summary 207

Equation Summary 208

List of Symbols 209

Important Terms and Concepts 209

References 209

Questions and Problems 209

Design Problems 214

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 215

7. Mechanical Properties 216

Learning Objectives 217

7.1 Introduction 217

7.2 Concepts of Stress and Strain 218

ELASTIC DEFORMATION 222

7.3 Stress–Strain Behavior 222

7.4 Anelasticity 225

7.5 Elastic Properties of Materials 226

MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR—METALS 228

7.6 Tensile Properties 229

7.7 True Stress and Strain 236

7.8 Elastic Recovery after Plastic Deformation 239

7.9 Compressive, Shear, and Torsional Deformations 239

MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR—CERAMICS 240

7.10 Flexural Strength 240

7.11 Elastic Behavior 241

7.12 Influence of Porosity on the Mechanical Properties of Ceramics 241

MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR—POLYMERS 243

7.13 Stress–Strain Behavior 243

7.14 Macroscopic Deformation 245

7.15 Viscoelastic Deformation 246

HARDNESS AND OTHER MECHANICAL PROPERTY CONSIDERATIONS 250

7.16 Hardness 250

7.17 Hardness of Ceramic Materials 255

7.18 Tear Strength and Hardness of Polymers 256

PROPERTY VARIABILITY AND DESIGN/SAFETY FACTORS 257

7.19 Variability of Material Properties 257

7.20 Design/Safety Factors 259

Summary 263

Equation Summary 265

List of Symbols 266

Important Terms and Concepts 267

References 267

Questions and Problems 268

Design Problems 276

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 277

8. Deformation and Strengthening Mechanisms 279

Learning Objectives 280

8.1 Introduction 280

DEFORMATION MECHANISMS FOR METALS 280

8.2 Historical 281

8.3 Basic Concepts of Dislocations 281

8.4 Characteristics of Dislocations 283

8.5 Slip Systems 284

8.6 Slip in Single Crystals 286

8.7 Plastic Deformation of Polycrystalline Metals 289

8.8 Deformation by Twinning 291

MECHANISMS OF STRENGTHENING IN METALS 292

8.9 Strengthening by Grain Size Reduction 292

8.10 Solid-Solution Strengthening 294

8.11 Strain Hardening 295

RECOVERY, RECRYSTALLIZATION, AND GRAIN GROWTH 298

8.12 Recovery 298

8.13 Recrystallization 299

8.14 Grain Growth 303

DEFORMATION MECHANISMS FOR CERAMIC MATERIALS 305

8.15 Crystalline Ceramics 305

8.16 Noncrystalline Ceramics 305

MECHANISMS OF DEFORMATION AND FOR STRENGTHENING OF POLYMERS 306

8.17 Deformation of Semicrystalline Polymers 306

8.18 Factors that Influence the Mechanical Properties of Semicrystalline Polymers 308

Materials of Importance—Shrink-Wrap Polymer Films 311

8.19 Deformation of Elastomers 312

Summary 314

Equation Summary 317

List of Symbols 317

Important Terms and Concepts 317

References 318

Questions and Problems 318

Design Problems 323

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 323

9. Failure 324

Learning Objectives 325

9.1 Introduction 325

FRACTURE 326

9.2 Fundamentals of Fracture 326

9.3 Ductile Fracture 326

9.4 Brittle Fracture 328

9.5 Principles of Fracture Mechanics 330

9.6 Brittle Fracture of Ceramics 339

9.7 Fracture of Polymers 343

9.8 Fracture Toughness Testing 345

FATIGUE 349

9.9 Cyclic Stresses 350

9.10 The S–N Curve 351

9.11 Fatigue in Polymeric Materials 356

9.12 Crack Initiation and Propagation 357

9.13 Factors that Affect Fatigue Life 359

9.14 Environmental Effects 361

CREEP 362

9.15 Generalized Creep Behavior 362

9.16 Stress and Temperature Effects 363

9.17 Data Extrapolation Methods 366

9.18 Alloys for High-Temperature Use 367

9.19 Creep in Ceramic and Polymeric

Materials 368

Summary 368

Equation Summary 371

List of Symbols 372

Important Terms and Concepts 373

References 373

Questions and Problems 373

Design Problems 378

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 379

10. Phase Diagrams 380

Learning Objectives 381

10.1 Introduction 381

DEFINITIONS AND BASIC CONCEPTS 381

10.2 Solubility Limit 382

10.3 Phases 383

10.4 Microstructure 383

10.5 Phase Equilibria 383

10.6 One-Component (or Unary) Phase Diagrams 384

BINARY PHASE DIAGRAMS 385

10.7 Binary Isomorphous Systems 386

10.8 Interpretation of Phase Diagrams 388

10.9 Development of Microstructure in Isomorphous Alloys 392

10.10 Mechanical Properties of Isomorphous Alloys 395

10.11 Binary Eutectic Systems 395

10.12 Development of Microstructure in Eutectic Alloys 401

Materials of Importance—Lead-Free Solders 402

10.13 Equilibrium Diagrams Having Intermediate Phases or Compounds 408

10.14 Eutectoid and Peritectic Reactions 411

10.15 Congruent Phase Transformations 412

10.16 Ceramic Phase Diagrams 412

10.17 Ternary Phase Diagrams 416

10.18 The Gibbs Phase Rule 417

THE IRON–CARBON SYSTEM 419

10.19 The Iron–Iron Carbide (Fe–Fe3C) Phase Diagram 419

10.20 Development of Microstructure in Iron–Carbon Alloys 422

10.21 The Influence of Other Alloying Elements 429

Summary 430

Equation Summary 432

List of Symbols 433

Important Terms and Concepts 433

References 433

Questions and Problems 433

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 440

11. Phase Transformations 441

Learning Objectives 442

11.1 Introduction 442

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS IN METALS 442

11.2 Basic Concepts 443

11.3 The Kinetics of Phase Transformations 443

11.4 Metastable Versus Equilibrium States 454

MICROSTRUCTURAL AND PROPERTY CHANGES IN IRON–CARBON ALLOYS 455

11.5 Isothermal Transformation Diagrams 455

11.6 Continuous-Cooling Transformation Diagrams 466

11.7 Mechanical Behavior of Iron–Carbon Alloys 469

11.8 Tempered Martensite 473

11.9 Review of Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties for Iron–Carbon Alloys 476

Materials of Importance—Shape-Memory Alloys 479

PRECIPITATION HARDENING 482

11.10 Heat Treatments 482

11.11 Mechanism of Hardening 484

11.12 Miscellaneous Considerations 486

CRYSTALLIZATION, MELTING, AND GLASS TRANSITION PHENOMENA IN POLYMERS 487

11.13 Crystallization 487

11.14 Melting 488

11.15 The Glass Transition 488

11.16 Melting and Glass Transition Temperatures 489

11.17 Factors that Influence Melting and Glass Transition Temperatures 489

Summary 492

Equation Summary 494

List of Symbols 495

Important Terms and Concepts 495

References 495

Questions and Problems 495

Design Problems 500

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 501

12. Electrical Properties 503

Learning Objectives 504

12.1 Introduction 504

ELECTRICAL CONDUCTION 504

12.2 Ohm’s Law 504

12.3 Electrical Conductivity 505

12.4 Electronic and Ionic Conduction 506

12.5 Energy Band Structures in Solids 506

12.6 Conduction in Terms of Band and Atomic Bonding Models 508

12.7 Electron Mobility 510

12.8 Electrical Resistivity of Metals 511

12.9 Electrical Characteristics of Commercial Alloys 514

Materials of Importance—Aluminum Electrical Wires 514

SEMICONDUCTIVITY 516

12.10 Intrinsic Semiconduction 516

12.11 Extrinsic Semiconduction 519

12.12 The Temperature Dependence of Carrier Concentration 522

12.13 Factors that Affect Carrier Mobility 523

12.14 The Hall Effect 527

12.15 Semiconductor Devices 529

ELECTRICAL CONDUCTION IN IONIC CERAMICS AND IN POLYMERS 535

12.16 Conduction in Ionic Materials 536

12.17 Electrical Properties of Polymers 536

DIELECTRIC BEHAVIOR 537

12.18 Capacitance 537

12.19 Field Vectors and Polarization 539

12.20 Types of Polarization 542

12.21 Frequency Dependence of the Dielectric Constant 544

12.22 Dielectric Strength 545

12.23 Dielectric Materials 545

OTHER ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MATERIALS 545

12.24 Ferroelectricity 545

12.25 Piezoelectricity 546

Material of Importance—Piezoelectric Ceramic Ink-Jet Printer Heads 547

Summary 548

Equation Summary 551

List of Symbols 551

Important Terms and Concepts 552

References 552

Questions and Problems 553

Design Problems 557

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 558

13. Types and Applications of Materials 559

Learning Objectives 560

13.1 Introduction 560

TYPES OF METAL ALLOYS 560

13.2 Ferrous Alloys 560

13.3 Nonferrous Alloys 573

Materials of Importance—Metal Alloys Used for Euro Coins 583

TYPES OF CERAMICS 584

13.4 Glasses 585

13.5 Glass-Ceramics 585

13.6 Clay Products 587

13.7 Refractories 587

13.8 Abrasives 590

13.9 Cements 592

13.10 Carbons 593

13.11 Advanced Ceramics 595

TYPES OF POLYMERS 600

13.12 Plastics 600

Materials of Importance—Phenolic Billiard Balls 603

13.13 Elastomers 603

13.14 Fibers 605

13.15 Miscellaneous Applications 606

13.16 Advanced Polymeric Materials 607

Summary 611

Important Terms and Concepts 614

References 614

Questions and Problems 614

Design Questions 615

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions 616

14. Synthesis, Fabrication, and Processing of Materials 617

Learning Objectives 618

14.1 Introduction 618

FABRICATION OF METALS 618

14.2 Forming Operations 619

14.3 Casting 620

14.4 Miscellaneous Techniques 622

THERMAL PROCESSING OF METALS 623

14.5 Annealing Processes 623

14.6 Heat Treatment of Steels 626

FABRICATION OF CERAMIC MATERIALS 635

14.7 Fabrication and Processing of Glasses and Glass-Ceramics 637

14.8 Fabrication and Processing of Clay Products 642

14.9 Powder Pressing 646

14.10 Tape Casting 648

SYNTHESIS AND FABRICATION OF POLYMERS 649

14.11 Polymerization 649

14.12 Polymer Additives 652

14.13 Forming Techniques for Plastics 653

14.14 Fabrication of Elastomers 656

14.15 Fabrication of Fibers and Films 656

Summary 657

Important Terms and Concepts 660

References 660

Questions and Problems 660

Design Problems 663

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 663

15. Composites 664

Learning Objectives 665

15.1 Introduction 665

PARTICLE-REINFORCED COMPOSITES 667

15.2 Large–Particle Composites 667

15.3 Dispersion-Strengthened Composites 671

FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITES 671

15.4 Influence of Fiber Length 672

15.5 Influence of Fiber Orientation and Concentration 673

15.6 The Fiber Phase 681

15.7 The Matrix Phase 683

15.8 Polymer-Matrix Composites 683

15.9 Metal-Matrix Composites 689

15.10 Ceramic-Matrix Composites 690

15.11 Carbon–Carbon Composites 692

15.12 Hybrid Composites 692

15.13 Processing of Fiber-Reinforced Composites 693

STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES 695

15.14 Laminar Composites 695

15.15 Sandwich Panels 697

Case Study—Use of Composites in the Boeing 787 Dreamliner 699

15.16 Nanocomposites 700

Summary 703

Equation Summary 705

List of Symbols 706

Important Terms and Concepts 706

References 706

Questions and Problems 707

Design Problems 709

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 710

16. Corrosion and Degradation of Materials 711

Learning Objectives 712

16.1 Introduction 712

CORROSION OF METALS 713

16.2 Electrochemical Considerations 713

16.3 Corrosion Rates 719

16.4 Prediction of Corrosion Rates 721

16.5 Passivity 727

16.6 Environmental Effects 728

16.7 Forms of Corrosion 729

16.8 Corrosion Environments 736

16.9 Corrosion Prevention 737

16.10 Oxidation 739

CORROSION OF CERAMIC MATERIALS 742

DEGRADATION OF POLYMERS 742

16.11 Swelling and Dissolution 742

16.12 Bond Rupture 744

16.13 Weathering 746

Summary 746

Equation Summary 748

List of Symbols 749

Important Terms and Concepts 750

References 750

Questions and Problems 750

Design Problems 753

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 753

17. Thermal Properties 755

Learning Objectives 756

17.1 Introduction 756

17.2 Heat Capacity 756

17.3 Thermal Expansion 760

Materials of Importance—Invar and Other Low-Expansion Alloys 762

17.4 Thermal Conductivity 763

17.5 Thermal Stresses 766

Summary 768

Equation Summary 769

List of Symbols 770

Important Terms and Concepts 770

References 770

Questions and Problems 770

Design Problems 772

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 773

18. Magnetic Properties 774

Learning Objectives 775

18.1 Introduction 775

18.2 Basic Concepts 775

18.3 Diamagnetism and Paramagnetism 779

18.4 Ferromagnetism 781

18.5 Antiferromagnetism and Ferrimagnetism 782

18.6 The Influence of Temperature on Magnetic Behavior 786

18.7 Domains and Hysteresis 787

18.8 Magnetic Anisotropy 790

18.9 Soft Magnetic Materials 791

Materials of Importance—An Iron–Silicon Alloy that Is Used in Transformer Cores 792

18.10 Hard Magnetic Materials 793

18.11 Magnetic Storage 796

18.12 Superconductivity 799

Summary 802

Equation Summary 804

List of Symbols 804

Important Terms and Concepts 805

References 805

Questions and Problems 805

Design Problems 808

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 808

19. Optical Properties 809

Learning Objectives 810

19.1 Introduction 810

BASIC CONCEPTS 810

19.2 Electromagnetic Radiation 810

19.3 Light Interactions with Solids 812

19.4 Atomic and Electronic Interactions 813

OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF METALS 814

OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NONMETALS 815

19.5 Refraction 815

19.6 Reflection 817

19.7 Absorption 817

19.8 Transmission 821

19.9 Color 821

19.10 Opacity and Translucency in Insulators 823

APPLICATIONS OF OPTICAL PHENOMENA 824

19.11 Luminescence 824

19.12 Photoconductivity 824

Materials of Importance—Light-Emitting Diodes 825

19.13 Lasers 827

19.14 Optical Fibers in Communications 831

Summary 833

Equation Summary 835

List of Symbols 836

Important Terms and Concepts 836

References 836

Questions and Problems 836

Design Problem 838

Fundamentals of Engineering Questions and Problems 838

20. Economic, Environmental, and Societal Issues in Materials Science and Engineering 839

Learning Objectives 840

20.1 Introduction 840

ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS 840

20.2 Component Design 841

20.3 Materials 841

20.4 Manufacturing Techniques 841

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIETAL CONSIDERATIONS 842

20.5 Recycling Issues in Materials Science and Engineering 844

Materials of Importance—Biodegradable and Biorenewable Polymers/Plastics 849

Summary 851

References 851

Design Questions 852

Appendix A The International System of Units (SI) 853

Appendix B Properties of Selected Engineering Materials 855

B.1: Density 855

B.2: Modulus of Elasticity 858

B.3: Poisson’s Ratio 862

B.4: Strength and Ductility 863

B.5: Plane Strain Fracture Toughness 868

B.6: Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion 870

B.7: Thermal Conductivity 873

B.8: Specific Heat 876

B.9: Electrical Resistivity 879

B.10: Metal Alloy Compositions 882

Appendix C Costs and Relative Costs for Selected Engineering Materials 884

Appendix D Repeat Unit Structures for Common Polymers 889

Appendix E Glass Transition and Melting Temperatures for Common Polymeric Materials 893

Glossary 894

Answers to Selected Problems 907

Index 912

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New To This Edition

New to WileyPLUS:
New resources designed to support a more engaging Learning Experience and more meaningful Learning Outcomes:
 VMSE (Virtual Materials Science & Engineering), with a new interface, helps students visualize concepts related to crystal structures, diffusion tensile tests, and more. For example, it allows students to rotate unit cells in 3-d to better understand molecular structures. Also includes a Database of Engineering Materials Properties that can be used for materials selection problems.
 Questions about VMS: Questions that students need to use VMSE to answer help students get best value from its use, and instructors incentivize its use.
 Video Tutorials - “muddy point” videos feature a student explaining tough concepts that have been identified through research as the most
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The Wiley Advantage

The authors present the basic fundamentals on a level appropriate for university/college students who have completed their freshmen calculus, chemistry, and physics courses.

Topics and concepts are treated in sufficient detail to the extent that students have the opportunity to fully understand it without having to consult other sources.

The “Why Study?” element at the opening of each chapter highlights important applications of materials science engineering.

The Virtual Materials Science and Engineering (VMSE) animations facilitate student visualization of molecular structures and the learning of key concepts.

Concept Check questions enable students to self-assess their understanding of basic concepts.

Appendices that list property and price for a large number of materials enable the student to solve a number of materials selection problems that are presented in the book.
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CORRELATION GUIDE
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PowerPoint Presentations
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EXTENDED LEARNING OBJECTIVES
A more extensive list of learning objectives than what is provided at the beginning of each chapter. These direct the student to study material in a greater degree of depth.
CASE STUDIES
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EXTENDED LEARNING OBJECTIVES
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Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, 5th Edition
ISBN : 978-1-119-12764-2
960 pages
December 2015, ©2015
$64.00   BUY

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Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, Binder Ready Version, 5th Edition
ISBN : 978-1-119-17548-3
960 pages
December 2015, ©2016
$179.95   BUY

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