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Journal of Sociolinguistics

Vol 20 (5 Issues in 2016)
Edited by: Allan Bell
Print ISSN: 1360-6441 Online ISSN: 1467-9841
Impact Factor: 1.245
Journal of Sociolinguistics (JOSL) cover image


The Journal of Sociolinguistics is an international forum for leading research on language and society. It is open to both established and innovative approaches to sociolinguistic research. The Journal promotes sociolinguistics as a thoroughly linguistic and thoroughly social-scientific endeavour. The linguistic and the social are both expected to be present in all contributions. Language is regarded as not only a reflection of society but as itself constituting much of the character of social life. The Journal promotes the building and critique of sociolinguistic theory and encourages the application of social theory to linguistic issues. The Journal is hospitable to linguistic analyses ranging from the micro to the macro, from the quantitative study phonological variables to discourse analysis of texts. It is open to data from a wide range of languages and international contexts. Contributions from the ethnographic, variationist, constructivist and sociology of language traditions are welcomed, as are papers from the social psychology of language, anthropological linguistics, discourse analysis, language and gender studies, pragmatics and conversational analysis.

  • In five issues of 160 pages each per year, the Journal of Sociolinguistics encourages submissions which forge innovative links, theoretically or empirically, between social life and linguistic practices. We publish and encourage articles that build or critique sociolinguistic theory, and the application of recent social theory to language data and issues.
  • Data in published articles represent a wide range of languages, regions and situations - from Māori to Mongolian, from Sweden to Korea, from genetic counseling sessions to asylum interviews.
  • The journal publishes occasional thematic issues on new topics of wide relevance to sociolinguistics, including 'Sociolinguistics and Tourism' (2014, edited by Adam Jaworski, Crispin Thurlow and Monica Heller) and an issue reflecting on the work of William Labov (2016, edited by Allan Bell, David Britain and Devynai Sharma).
  • The journal also carries other themed content, including opinion pieces and exchanges between scholars on topical issues, such as media and language change (2014) and approaches to interaction in other fields (theme series 2016-2017).
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