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Risk Management: Lever for SME Development and Stakeholder Value Creation

Risk Management: Lever for SME Development and Stakeholder Value Creation

Céline Bérard (Editor), Christine Teyssier (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-119-47501-9

Nov 2017, Wiley-ISTE

312 pages

£97.99

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Description

Risk management practices are growing both in number and complexity in businesses, notably driven by new regulatory standards that feature risk management at their core. Although large businesses are more likely to adopt a formal, holistic approach to risk management, the stakes are just as high for SMEs. Risk management in SMEs can contribute to a certain organizational, entrepreneurial and partnership dynamic which constitutes a real opportunity to evolve practices and improve performance. This book offers varied responses to this question by combining conceptual approaches, empirical illustrations and the associated managerial implications.

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Preface  xiii

Introduction xvii
Maria CREMA

Part 1. Risk Management, Governance and Stakeholder Value Creation  1

Chapter 1. Role of the Governance System in Strategic Risk Management  3
Martine SEVILLE and Christine TEYSSIER

1.1. Introduction  3

1.2. The role of managers and the governance system in risk management: enabling and constraining influences  4

1.2.1. Managers of SMEs shape risk management in their company  4

1.2.2. Extended governance system as support to managers of SMEs in the strategic management of risks 5

1.3. Comparison of proposals in nine SMEs cases 9

1.3.1. Presentation of the sample  9

1.3.2. Findings and discussion  12

1.4. Conclusion  18

1.5. Bibliography  19

Chapter 2. Integration of ISO 26000 International Standard by SMEs: Toward a Better Understanding of Risks  25
Camille DE BOVIS and Sylvaine MERCURI CHAPUIS

2.1. Introduction  25

2.2. When risk leads to reliability  27

2.3. Toward a better understanding of risks by actors: the role of ISO 26000  29

2.3.1. Risk-specific standards are not effective for SMEs 29

2.3.2. ISO 26000: reading grid for SMEs 34

2.4. Toward a better understanding of risks by responsible actors 38

2.5. Conclusion  39

2.6. Bibliography  41

Chapter 3. Managing SMEs’ Economic Dependence Risks: in Favor of Disciplinary and Relational Governance 45
Martine SEVILLE, Caroline CHAMPAGNE-DE-LABRIOLLE and Nathalie CLAVEAU

3.1. Introduction  45

3.2. Structural approach to the economic dependence of SMEs and its implications in terms of risk management  47

3.2.1. An approach based on the asymmetry of initial powers and resources  47

3.2.2. A structural approach emphasizing the risk of abuse of economic dependence which is however difficult to characterize and whose management requires disciplinary governance of the relationship  48

3.2.3. Tools to manage the risk of abuse of economic dependence before any necessary disciplinary measures but with limitations 51

3.3. An approach to economic dependence by embeddedness: towards relational governance  52

3.3.1. From a structural approach to economic dependence relationships to an embeddedness approach 52

3.3.2. SME development challenges for embedding their economic dependence relationship with their partner 54

3.3.3. An embeddedness that is not without risk for SMEs and which must be managed by means of a suitable governance 56

3.4. Conclusion: the need for a systemic approach to economic dependence as well as a disciplinary and relational governance to manage the risks of this dependence 62

3.5. Bibliography  63

Chapter 4. Reputation Risk: Anticipation and Management of Reputation Failure 65
Laure AMBROISE and Isabelle PRIM-ALLAZ

4.1. Introduction  65

4.2. Reputation, definition and challenges for SMEs  66

4.2.1. Reputation: definition.  66

4.2.2. Reputation challenges for SMEs 69

4.3. Reputation risk for SMEs  72

4.3.1. Lack of reputation 72

4.3.2. Loss of reputation 73

4.4. Actions and tools to build and preserve reputation  74

4.4.1. Quality of offerings and expertise 74

4.4.2. The role of the quality of the relationship with different stakeholders  75

4.4.3. Enhance commitment in the city and territory  76

4.4.4. Managers’ image 78

4.5. Conclusion  78

4.6. Bibliography  79

Part 2. Risk Management as a Lever for Organizational Development  85

Chapter 5. Proactive Management of Operating Risks: A Lever to Improve External Funding for SMEs?  87
Josée ST-PIERRE and Richard LACOURSIÈRE

5.1. Introduction  87

5.2. Decisions for funding SMEs and risk measurement  88

5.2.1. Assessment of SMEs risk by funders 89

5.2.2. Risk measurement: financial and non-financial data 90

5.3. Risks, risk sources and risk control 91

5.3.1. Different risk sources  91

5.3.2. Risk management practices  92

5.4. Methodology  93

5.4.1. Presentation of sample  94

5.4.2. Identification of variables  94

5.4.3. Analysis tools 96

5.5. Presentation of results and discussion 96

5.5.1. Presentation of results  96

5.5.2. Analysis and discussion  99

5.6. Conclusion  100

5.7. Appendices  102

5.7.1. Typological analysis of group companies. 102

5.7.2. Implementation rates of practices in cluster 2 subgroups 103

5.8. Bibliography  104

Chapter 6. Risk Management: A Lever for Organizational Change for SMEs?  107
Céline BÉRARD and Nathalie CLAVEAU

6.1. Introduction  107

6.2. From risk management to organizational change  108

6.2.1. Organizational change: the forgotten link between risk management and performance? 109

6.2.2. Organizational changes: how to qualify them  110

6.3. Methodology  112

6.3.1. Selection and presentation of cases 112

6.3.2. Data collection and analysis  113

6.4. Results and discussion 114

6.4.1. Decision to adopt a risk management system: contexts and organizational changes induced 114

6.4.2. Synthesis and discussion of results 119

6.5. Conclusion  122

6.6. Bibliography  123

Chapter 7. Product Innovation in SMEs: Risk Identification Capacities  127
Jacques BERTRAND and Josée ST-PIERRE

7.1. Introduction  127

7.2. Literature review and development of the analysis framework  128

7.2.1. Risk management and SMEs  128

7.2.2. Characteristics of SMEs and their ability to identify risks 130

7.3. Methodology adopted 134

7.3.1. Identification of sample  134

7.3.2. Data collection and coding of variables 134

7.4. Findings and discussion 135

7.4.1. Presentation of results  136

7.4.2. Discussion  139

7.5. Conclusion  141

7.6. Appendix: examples of verbatim and testimonials used to assign scores 142

7.7. Bibliography  144

Chapter 8. Counterfeiting Risk Management for SMEs and Industrial Subcontracting Activities: A Literature Review  149
Manal EL BEKKARI, Catherine MERCIER-SUISSA, Céline BOUVERET-RIVAT and Lynda SAOUDI

8.1. Introduction  149

8.2. Literature review on industrial subcontracting and counterfeiting risk 151

8.2.1. Industrial subcontracting  151

8.2.2. Industrial Property Rights (IPR), strategic assets to be protected 153

8.3. Counterfeiting and counterfeiting risk factors associated with industrial subcontracting 155

8.4. Counterfeiting hedge strategies  158

8.5. Conclusion  161

8.6. Bibliography  163

Part 3. Risk Perception and Management by the Manager-Entrepreneur 169

Chapter 9. Entrepreneurial Risk-taking and the Mentoring of Entrepreneurs: the Danger of Cognitive Biases  171
Saulo DUBARD BARBOSA and Luc DUQUENNE

9.1. Introduction  171

9.1.1. The entrepreneur: a risk taker? 171

9.1.2. Two types of entrepreneurial risks: the risk of failure and the risk of missing an opportunity 172

9.1.3. Venture creation support and mentoring 173

9.1.4. Heuristics and cognitive biases 174

9.2. Methodology  175

9.3. Cognitive biases in action in the mentoring and support of entrepreneurs 176

9.3.1. The phenomenon of substitution, the heuristics of representativeness and the law of small numbers  176

9.3.2. Overconfidence, confirmatory bias and planning fallacy 178

9.3.3. Availability 180

9.4. Understanding cognitive biases from a risk management perspective  182

9.4.1. Training of mentors 182

9.4.2. Shared mentorship 184

9.4.3. Going beyond the business plan 185

9.5. Conclusion  186

9.6. Bibliography  186

Chapter 10. From Necessity to Vulnerable Entrepreneur 193
Caroline BAYART and Séverine SALEILLES

10.1. Introduction  193

10.2. A different way of perceiving necessity entrepreneurs 194

10.2.1. From the necessity entrepreneur to be motivated  194

10.2.2.  to the vulnerable entrepreneur to be secured  196

10.3. Risk management, an ability to develop in vulnerable entrepreneurs 198

10.3.1. Risk management challenges in entrepreneurship 198

10.3.2. The issue of risk management in entrepreneurial support  199

10.4. Supporting vulnerable entrepreneurs through proactive risk management practices: an exploratory study 200

10.4.1. Presentation of study and respondents 200

10.4.2. Multiple dimensions of vulnerability within the entrepreneurial context  201

10.4.3. Supporting the implementation of risk mitigation strategies by vulnerable entrepreneurs 203

10.5. Conclusion  206

10.6. Bibliography  207

Chapter 11. Entrepreneurial Approach in SMEs: Specificities, Vulnerabilities and Risks 211
Lynda SAOUDI and Stéphane FOLIARD

11.1. Introduction  211

11.2. Re-entrepreneurship in SME: genealogy of the concept 212

11.2.1. The specificities of SMEs  213

11.2.2. Entrepreneurship in SME: contribution of the literature on large businesses 213

11.3. Entrepreneurship in SMEs, a risky activity 216

11.3.1. The vulnerability of traditional SMEs 216

11.3.2. Risks associated with managers 217

11.3.3. Risks associated with employees 218

11.3.4. Management risks associated with information  219

11.4. Anticipating and managing risks to develop SME entrepreneurship  220

11.4.1. Developing the entrepreneurial agility of managers 220

11.4.2. Developing the entrepreneurial agility of employees 221

11.4.3. Developing organizational agility 222

11.4.4. Developing relational agility 224

11.5. Conclusion  225

11.6. Bibliography  227

Chapter 12. Perception Biases of Failure Risk among SME Managers  233
Nathalie CLAVEAU, Muriel PEREZ and Thierry SERBOFF

12.1. Introduction  233

12.2. Literature review 234

12.2.1. Failure process 234

12.2.2. Perception of risk of failure and perception bias 235

12.3. Research methodology 237

12.3.1. Data from Observatoire “Prisma” (Prisma Observatory) 237

12.3.2. Measurements of real and perceived risk 238

12.3.3. Analysis variables 238

12.4. Findings and discussion  239

12.4.1. The existence of gaps between perceived and real risk 239

12.4.2. Groups characterization  240

12.4.3. Discussion 241

12.5. Conclusion and managerial implications 244

12.6. Appendix: List of selected variables 245

12.7. Bibliography  247

Conclusion 251
Alain Charles MARTINET

List of Authors  265

Index 269