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From UXD to LivXD: Living eXperience Design

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From UXD to LivXD: Living eXperience Design

Sylvie Leleu-Merviel (Editor), Daniel Schmitt (Editor), Philippe Useille (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-119-61224-7 April 2019 Wiley-ISTE 284 Pages

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Description

Living eXperience Design – the design of life experiences – is an extension of user experience design (UXD). The context comprises usage and practice in real contexts in which spatial, urban, social, temporal, historical and legal dimensions are considered. Reflecting upon LivXD is to examine the whole experience of a target audience in a variety of situations – and not only in those involving digital technology.

This book begins with the definition of LivXD and its associated epistemology, and proceeds to detail field experiments in certain privileged areas: the relation to creation and works, mediation and adult education.

Introduction xi
Sylvie LELEU-MERVIEL, Daniel SCHMITT and Philippe USEILLE

Part 1. Epistemology and Concepts 1

Chapter 1. From UXD (User eXperience Design) to LivXD (Living eXperience Design): Towards the Concept of Experiences of Life and their Design 3
Patrizia LAUDATI and Sylvie LELEU-MERVIEL

1.1. Introduction 3

1.2. The source of UXD 4

1.2.1. From design to user-centered design (UCD) 4

1.2.2. What is UXD? 5

1.2.3. The UXD approach in practice 7

1.2.4. Assessment 9

1.3. Beyond digital devices: from experience design to life experience design 10

1.3.1. The framework of the experience: spaces and living spaces 10

1.3.2. The practices of the places: living experience and visit experience 11

1.4. Views on experience 12

1.4.1. Experience according to Dewey 13

1.4.2. The conditions of experience according to Dewey 14

1.4.3. The meaning of experience according to Dewey 16

1.4.4. When Dewey anticipates Varéla 17

1.4.5. Theureau’s course of experience applied to the case of the visit experience 18

1.4.6. Françoise Héritier’s identity perspective 19

1.5. How can we design experience? 20

1.5.1. Is it possible to design experience? 20

1.5.2. How can we design the spatial framework of experience? 21

1.5.3. Criteria for the spatial preconfiguration of life experience: LivXD 21

1.6. Conclusion and perspectives 23

1.7. References 24

1.8. Webography 26

Chapter 2. Thinking and Living “Experience”: Pragmatist Contributions from John Dewey 27
Françoise BERNARD

2.1. Introduction 27

2.2. Reading experiences: paths to experience in John Dewey’s work 28

2.3. John Dewey: a broad, constructed and argued pragmatism 31

2.4. A social philosophy open to multiple themes and practices 33

2.5. Conclusion 36

2.6. References 37

2.7 Webography 40

Chapter 3. Paths Created by an Enactive-relativized Approach to Experience: the Case of Viewing Experience 41
Charles-Alexandre DELESTAGE

3.1. Introduction 41

3.2. Method of relativized conceptualization and enaction 42

3.2.1. On the subject of embodied cognition 42

3.2.2. Method of relativized conceptualization 45

3.2.3. Enaction 51

3.2.4. First theoretical contributions 53

3.3. From percept to concept 55

3.3.1. The body, a unit of consciousness 56

3.3.2. Communication perspective 63

3.3.3. Communicability of the lived experience 70

3.4. The horizon of relevance 72

3.4.1. Specific individual expectations and relevance: the case of viewing experience 73

3.4.2. Towards a horizon of relevance 77

3.5. Conclusion 81

3.6. Appendix: MRC summary 82

3.7. References 91

Chapter 4. The Lived Experience as an Alternative to Digital Uses 93
Philippe BONFILS, Laurent COLLET and Michel DURAMPART

4.1. Introduction 93

4.2. A partial review of a scientific production linked to the questions of experience 94

4.2.1. Two references: enactivism and narrative semiotics 94

4.2.2. The prism of the relationship with the device 95

4.2.3. Shifting gaze, from interaction to the subject’s transformations 96

4.2.4. The literacy current 96

4.3. The lived experience in i3M Toulon research programs (IMSIC) questioning digital technology at school 97

4.3.1. Prerequisites: a context of paradoxical injunctions 98

4.3.2. An example of “diligence” 98

4.3.3. The bottom line: rigidities, immobilization and fears 101

4.4. The lived experience in i3M Toulon research programs (IMSIC) questioning immersive environments and industry training 102

4.4.1. The observation of a shift from uses to experiences to be lived 102

4.4.2. From experience stories to testing 104

4.5. Assessment: the lived experience and its methodological consequences in research 106

4.6. Conclusion 107

4.7. References 108

Part 2. Experiences of Creation and/or Work 111

Chapter 5. Sources of Video Mapping: a “Proto-narrativity” of a Musical Nature? 113
Pascal BOUCHEZ and Philippe USEILLE

5.1 Introduction 113

5.2. Video mapping and narrativity: a musical chord? 114

5.3 Parent-child interactions and proto-narrativity 118

5.4. Proto-narrativity and configuration of the temporal experience 120

5.5. Conclusion 123

5.6. References 125

Chapter 6. In the Minds of Artists? Study of the Situated Artistic Creation Experience 127
Marine THÉBAULT and Daniel SCHMITT

6.1. Creation: between myth and mystery 127

6.2. Video mapping: a form of support for the study of creative experiences 128

6.3. REMIND: a method for analyzing the artistic creation experience 129

6.3.1. Summary of artists’ different courses of experience 132

6.3.2. Discussion 138

6.4. Conclusion 139

6.5. Acknowledgments 139

6.6. References 139

Chapter 7. Participants’ Experience in an Optical Illusion Installation 143
Khaldoun ZREIK and Ahmad ALI

7.1. Preamble 143

7.2. Visual perception and the art of optical illusion 144

7.2.1. Visual perception in an optical illusion 144

7.2.2. Geometrical-optical illusion 146

7.3. Receiving visual data 152

7.3.1. The spectator’s culture 153

7.3.2. The spectator’s age 154

7.3.3. The spectator’s gender 154

7.4. Mediation in the search for perspective 155

7.4.1. Anamorphosis 155

7.4.2. Digital anamorphosis 158

7.4.3. Lenticular printing 159

7.5. The art of optical illusion 161

7.5.1. Op Art: main features 163

7.5.2. The art of optical illusion from a unique viewpoint 165

7.5.3. The interactive optical illusion 171

7.6. Design examples 175

7.6.1. Unique perspective in the media 176

7.6.2. Experiment at Le Chêne 177

7.6.3. Spectator reactions to the installation 179

7.6.4. Experiment in an open public space: description 181

7.6.5. Spectator reactions 183

7.7. Conclusion 184

7.8. References 186

Part 3. Experiences in Mediation and Training 187

Chapter 8. The Concept of Experience in John Dewey’s Aesthetic Pragmatism: What are the Consequences for Cultural Mediation in the Museum? 189
Jérôme HENNEBERT

8.1. Introduction 189

8.2. Aesthetic theory before John Dewey 191

8.3. John Dewey’s aesthetic pragmatism: the continuity of art and existence 195

8.4. Towards a descriptive redefinition of cultural mediation in museums 198

8.5. Conclusion 203

8.6. References 203

Chapter 9. A Step Towards Experience Design in Museums 205
Daniel SCHMITT and Virginie BLONDEAU

9.1. Visitor experience and experience design 205

9.2. Reducing the concept of experience 206

9.3. REMIND, a method of accessing experience 207

9.4. Objectifying visitor experience: the Iguane marin 209

9.4.1. Analysis of the installation 211

9.5. Objectifying your own experience: the Louise de Bettignies project 212

9.6. A step closer to experience design? 214

9.7. References 215

Chapter 10. Towards Teaching Focused on the “Bridging Experience”: the Case of Urban Learning through Site Visits 217
Smaïl KHAINNAR

10.1. Introduction 217

10.2. Theoretical part: experience, and bridging experience in pedagogy 219

10.2.1. Experience: some conceptual milestones 219

10.2.2. What place is there for the bridging experience in pedagogy? 220

10.3. Application part: two site visits as experiential situations 222

10.3.1. Research methodology and experimental protocol 222

10.3.2. Results and discussion 224

10.4. Conclusion and possibilities 226

10.5. References 227

Chapter 11. Design Games and Game Design: Relations Between Design, Codesign and Serious Games in Adult Education 229
Julian ALVAREZ, Olivier IRRMANN, Damien DJAOUTI, Antoine TALY, Olivier RAMPNOUX and Louise SAUVÉ

11.1. Introduction 229

11.2. Definitions 230

11.2.1. Design and codesign 230

11.2.2. Design games 231

11.2.3. Games 232

11.2.4. Serious games 232

11.2.5. Game design 233

11.2.6. Gamification 234

11.3. Exploring the links between design and serious games 235

11.3.1. Design games and serious games 235

11.3.2. Design games and game design 235

11.4. The main approaches to designing a serious game 239

11.4.1. Identification of different approaches 239

11.4.2. Serious game design 241

11.4.3. Gamification 242

11.4.4. Degamification 243

11.4.5. Serious gaming 245

11.4.6. Review and discussion 249

11.5. Conclusion 250

11.6. References 251

List of Authors 255

Index 257