Skip to main content

A New Sociology of Work?

A New Sociology of Work?

Lynne Pettinger (Editor), Jane Perry (Editor), Rebecca Taylor (Editor), Miriam Glucksmann (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-13903-8

Mar 2006

256 pages

Select type: Paperback

$41.95

Product not available for purchase

Description

This book asks what might be required of “a new sociology of work” and why such a project is vital for understanding people’s working lives at the start of the twenty-first century.

  • A collection of essays examining the concept of work, questioning what constitutes work, and where work ends and other activities begin.
  • Acknowledges the work that goes on outside formal employment, in the family, the community and within various institutions.
  • Highlights the importance of understanding the broad range of experiences of work in order to provide a more meaningful account of people’s work practices.
  • Draws on studies which explore how localized temporal, temporal and socio-economic factors shape people’s experiences.
  • The editors develop a distinctive theoretical framework and draw together key conclusions and policy recommendations.
Acknowledgements.

Part 1: Conceptualizing work.

Confronting the challenges of work today: New horizons and perspectives (Jane Parry, Rebecca Taylor, Lynne Pettinger and Miriam Glucksmann).

Shifting boundaries and interconnections: extending the ‘total social organisation of labour’ (Miriam Glucksmann).

Part 2: Re-examining paid employment.

Friends, relations and colleagues: The blurred boundaries of the workplace (Lynne Pettinger).

Interaction distance and the social meaning of occupations (Wendy Bottero).

Changing Times; Flexibilization and the re-organization of work in feminized labour markets (Angela Coyle).

Part 3: Privatized work.

Time and labour: Fathers’ perceptions of employment and childcare (Esther Dermott).

Doing the dirty work of social class? Mothers’ work in support of their children’s schooling (Diane Reay).

Part 4: Challenging the boundaries of the public and private spheres.

Rethinking voluntary work (Rebecca F. Taylor).

Markets and politics: public and private relations in the case of prostitution (Jackie West and Terry Austrin).

Care in the Community? Gender and the reconfiguration of community work in a post-mining neighbourhood (Jane Parry).

Part 5: International comparisons.

Public and private: Implications for care work (Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong).

Care, work and feeling (Clare Ungerson).

Welfare State regimes and the social organization of labour: Childcare arrangements and the work/family balance dilemma (Margarita León).

Bibliography.

Notes on Contributors.

Index.


  • A collection of essays examining the concept of work, questioning what constitutes work, and where work ends and other activities begin.
  • Acknowledges the work that goes on outside formal employment, in the family, the community and within various institutions.
  • Highlights the importance of understanding the broad range of experiences of work in order to provide a more meaningful account of people’s work practices.
  • Draws on studies which explore how localized temporal, temporal and socio-economic factors shape people’s experiences.
  • The editors develop a distinctive theoretical framework and draw together key conclusions and policy recommendations.