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Academic Writing, Philosophy and Genre

Academic Writing, Philosophy and Genre

Michael A. Peters (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-19400-6

Jun 2009, Wiley-Blackwell

128 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$39.95

Description

This book investigates how philosophical texts display a variety of literary forms and explores philosophical writing and the relation of philosophy to literature and reading.
  • Discusses the many different philosophical genres that have developed, among them letters, the treatise, the confession, the meditation, the allegory, the essay, the soliloquy, the symposium, the consolation, the commentary, the disputation, and the dialogue
  • Shows how these forms of philosophy have conditioned and become the basis of academic writing (and assessment) within both the university and higher education more generally
  • Explores questions of philosophical writing and the relation of philosophy to literature and reading

Notes on Contributors vii

Introduction - Thinking in Fragments; Thinking in Systems ix
Michael A. Peters

1 Academic Writing, Genres and Philosophy 1
Michael A. Peters

2 Philosophical Writing: Prefacing as professing 14
Rob McCormack

3 Ong and Derrida on Presence: A case study in the conflict of traditions 38
John D. Schaeffer & David Gorman

4 Bridging Literary and Philosophical Genres: Judgement, reflection and education in Camus’ The Fall 55
Peter Roberts

5 Reading the Other: Ethics of encounter 70
Sarah Allen

6 The Art of Language Teaching as Interdisciplinary Paradigm 81
Thomas Erling Peterson

7 Philosophy as Literature 100
Jim Marshall

Index 111

"The book is certainly accessible to those interested in philosophi­cal writing." (Discourse Studies, December 2010)

  • Investigates how philosophical texts display a variety of literary forms
  • Explores the many different philosophical genres that have developed, among them letters, the treatise, the confession, the meditation, the allegory, the essay, the soliloquy, the symposium, the consolation, the commentary, the disputation, and the dialogue
  • Shows how these forms of philosophy have conditioned and become the basis of academic writing (and assessment) within both the university and higher education more generally
  • Explores questions of philosophical writing and the relation of philosophy to literature and reading