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African American Voices: A Documentary Reader from Emancipation to the Present

African American Voices: A Documentary Reader from Emancipation to the Present

Leslie Brown

ISBN: 978-1-444-33940-6

Feb 2014, Wiley-Blackwell

344 pages

In Stock

$106.95

Description

Compelling and enlightening, this collection of primary source documents allows twenty-first century students to ‘direct dial’ key figures in African-American history. It includes concise and perceptive commentary along with engaging suggestions for discussion and project work.

• Examines key themes from multiple perspectives
• Features a diverse range of voices that cut across class and political affiliations as well as across regions and generations
• Chronological and thematic coverage from emancipation to the current day
• Primary source documents include everything from letters and speeches to photographs, rap lyrics and newspaper reports
• Incorporates recent as well as traditional historical interpretations
• Classroom-ready text which includes keynotes on documents, differentiated material and engaging discussion questions

List of Illustrations ix

Series Editors’ Preface x

Acknowledgments xii

Introduction 1

Chapter 1 Freedom, 1865–1881 8

1 Black Ministers Meet with Representatives of the Federal Government, January 1865 9

2 Frederick Douglass Argues for Black Suffrage, April 1865 12

3 Jourdon Anderson Writes to His Old Master, 1865 15

4 Harriet Simril Testifies Before a Congressional Committee, South Carolina, 1871 18

5 Resolutions of the National Civil Rights Convention, 1873 21

6 The Exodusters, 1878 22

7 Black Washerwomen Demand a Living Wage, 1866 and 1881 24

Chapter 2 Upbuilding, 1893–1910 28

1 Ida B. Wells Speaks Out Against Lynching in the South, 1893 30

2 Booker T. Washington Speaks on Race at Atlanta, 1895 34

3 The National Association of Colored Women, 1897 and 1898 38

4 The Negro National Anthem, 1900 and 1905 44

5 Photographs from the Paris Exposition, 1900 46

6 From W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk, 1903 47

7 Black Leaders Disagree with Booker T. Washington: The Niagara Movement, 1905 52

8 Jack Johnson, 1910 56

Chapter 3 Migration, 1904–1919 59

1 Voices from The Independent, 1904 and 1912 60

2 Letters of Negro Migrants, 1916–1917 68

3 The East St. Louis Riot, 1917 72

4 Why African Americans Left the South, 1919 77

Chapter 4 Determination, 1917–1925 85

1 W. E. B. Du Bois on African Americans and World War I, 1918 and 1919 87

2 Poet Claude McKay Sets a New Tone, 1919 90

3 Emmett J. Scott Reflects on “What the Negro Got Out of the War,” 1919 90

4 Program of the NAACP, 1919 94

5 Marcus Garvey Outlines the Rights of Black Peoples, 1920 99

6 Cyril V. Briggs Merges Race Consciousness with Class Consciousness, 1922 106

7 Langston Hughes on Being Black in America, 1925 109

8 Amy Jacques Garvey Calls on Women to Lead, 1925 110

Chapter 5 Resistance, 1927–1939 114

1 The Scottsboro Boys Write to the Workers of the World, 1932 115

2 Angelo Herndon Joins the Communist Party, 1934 117

3 Ella Baker and Marvel Cooke Report on “The Bronx Slave Market,” 1935 124

4 Richard Wright Observes a Black Response to Joe Louis’ Victory, 1935 126

5 The Southern Negro Youth Congress on Freedom, Equality, and Opportunity, 1937 129

6 The Coordinating Committee for Employment, New York, 1938 131

7 Marian Anderson at the Lincoln Memorial, 1939 133

Chapter 6 Resolve, 1941–1952 136

1 The March on Washington Movement, 1941 138

2 The “Double V” Campaign, 1942 142

3 A Black Army Chaplain Protests the Treatment of Black Soldiers, 1944 142

4 Pauli Murray on Student Protests in Washington, DC, 1944 147

5 The Civil Rights Congress Charges the US with Genocide, 1951 151

6 African Americans Petition the President and the American Delegation to the United Nations, 1952 158

Chapter 7 Discontent, 1953–1959 165

1 Thurgood Marshall Reargues Brown v. Board of Education, 1953 167

2 The Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955 171

3 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Writes on Non-Violence, 1957 174

4 Robert F. Williams Advocates Armed Self-Defense, 1959 177

Chapter 8 Revolt, 1960–1963 184

1 Young Activists Form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), 1960 186

2 Ella Baker Reports on the Founding of SNCC, 1960 187

3 Robert Moses Writes from Jail in Magnolia, Mississippi, 1961 188

4 The Freedom Rides, 1961 189

5 Diane Nash Recalls the Early Student Movement, 1960–1961 191

6 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Writes a Letter from Birmingham Jail, 1963 197

7 The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 1963 206

Chapter 9 Power, 1964–1966 210

1 Malcolm X Reflects on the Approaches African Americans Must Use, 1964 211

2 Fannie Lou Hamer Testifies on Behalf of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, 1964 218

3 Bayard Rustin Considers the Future of the Movement, 1965 221

4 Stokely Carmichael Explains Black Power, 1966 227

Chapter 10 Revolution, 1966–1977 234

1 The Black Panther Party Articulates a Platform, 1966 235

2 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Opposes the War in Vietnam, 1967 238

3 The Poor People’s Campaign, 1968 243

4 The Black Panther Party Convenes a Revolutionary People’s Constitutional Convention, 1970 245

5 Gil Scott-Heron Warns: “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” 1971 250

6 The Combahee River Collective Statement Explains Black Feminism, 1977 252

Chapter 11 Crosscurrents, 1982–2001 261

1 Activists Call for Americans to Break Ties with South Africa, 1980 262

2 Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States, 1987 266

3 Jesse Jackson Rouses the Democratic National Convention, Atlanta, GA, July 19, 1988 271

4 African American Women in Defense of Ourselves, 1991 278

5 Maxine Waters Explains the Causes of Urban Crises to Congress, 1992 280

6 The Million Man March, 1995 282

7 Angela Davis Describes the Prison Industrial Complex, 1995 284

8 The Hip-Hop Summit Action Network, 2001 289

Chapter 12 Paradox, 2005–Present 293

1 New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin Addresses His City on Martin Luther King Day, 2006 295

2 Barack Obama Believes in “A More Perfect Union,” 2008 297

3 Julian Bond Reflects on Race and History in America, 2011 307

Index 316