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After Habermas: New Perspectives on the Public Sphere

After Habermas: New Perspectives on the Public Sphere

Nick Crossley (Editor), John Michael Roberts (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-12365-5

Aug 2004, Wiley-Blackwell

192 pages

Select type: Paperback

$41.95

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Description

Critiquing Habermas, this volume bring fresh perspectives and ideas to bear on debates about the public sphere.
  • Engages in different ways with Jürgen Habermas’s seminal study, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere.
  • Moves beyond Habermas by reflecting on current social processes and events, such as anti-corporate protests and the emergence of the Internet.
  • Considers alternative theories by Bakhtin, Bourdieu and Honneth, among others.
  • Combines work by established commentators and new researchers.
Introduction: John Michael Roberts and Nick Crossley.

1. Wild Publics and Grotesque Symposiums: Habermas and Bahktin on Dialogue, Everyday Life and the Public Sphere: Michael. E. Gardiner (Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario, Canada).

2. Justice and Drama: On Bakhtin as a Complement to Habermas: Ken Hirschkop (Department of English and American Studies, University of Manchester, UK).

3. John Stuart Mill, Free Speech and the Public Sphere: A Bakhtinian Critique: John Michael Roberts (Department of Sociology, University of Leeds, UK).

4. On Systematically Distorted Communication: Bourdieu and the Socio-Analysis of Publics: Nick Crossley (Department of Sociology, University of Manchester, UK).

5. Habermas and Social Movements – What’s New?: Gemma Edwards (Department of Sociology, University of Manchester, UK).

6. Expanding Dialogue: the Internet, the Public Sphere and Prospects for Transnational Democracy: James Bohman (Department of Philosophy, St Louis University, USA).

7. Feminism and the Political Economy of Transnational Public Space: Lisa McLaughlin.

Notes on contributors.

Index.

"An interesting and useful addition to the literature." (Variant, Winter 2008)

  • A dynamic and provocative contribution to contemporary debate about the public sphere.
  • Engages in different ways with Jürgen Habermas’s seminal study, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere.
  • Moves beyond Habermas by reflecting on current social processes and events, such as anti-corporate protests and the emergence of the Internet.
  • Considers alternative theories by Bakhtin, Bourdieu and Honneth, among others.
  • Combines work by established commentators and new researchers.