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Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 23, Biology of the Plant Cuticle

Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 23, Biology of the Plant Cuticle

Markus Riederer (Editor), Caroline Muller (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-17157-1

Apr 2008

456 pages

$280.99

Description

Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 23

A much clearer picture is now emerging of the fine structure of the plant cuticle and its surface, the composition of cuticular waxes and the biosynthetic pathways leading to them. Studies assessing the impact of UV radiation on plant life have emphasized the role of the cuticle and underlying epidermis as optical filters for solar radiation. The field concerned with the diffusive transport of lipophilic organic non-electrolytes across the plant cuticle has reached a state of maturity. A new paradigm has recently been proposed for the diffusion of polar compounds and water across the cuticle. In the context of plant ecophysiology, cuticular transpiration can now be placed in the perspective of whole-leaf water relations. New and unexpected roles have been assigned to the cuticle in plant development and pollen-stigma interactions. Finally, much progress has been made in understanding the cuticle as a specific and extraordinary substrate for the interactions of the plant with microorganisms, fungi and insects.


This volume details the major developments of recent years in this important interdisciplinary area. It is directed at researchers and professionals in plant biochemistry, plant physiology, plant ecology, phytopathology and environmental microbiology, in both the academic and industrial sectors.

1. Introduction: Biology of the plant cuticle.

Markus Riederer, Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.

2. The fine structure of the plant cuticle.

Christopher E. Jeffree, Science Faculty Electron Microscope Facility, Edinburgh, UK.

3. The cutin biopolymer matrix.

Ruth E. Shark and Shiying Tian, Department of Chemistry and Institute for Macromolecular Assemblies, City University of New York, College of Staten Island, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314-6600, USA.

4. Composition of plant cuticular waxes.

Reinhard Jetter, Departments of Botany and Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Ljerka Kunst and A. Lacey Samuels, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

5. Biosynthesis and transport of plant cuticular waxes.

Ljerka Kunst, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Dr Reinhard Jetter, Departments of Botany and Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; and A. Lacey Samuels, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

6. Optical properties of plant surfaces.

Erhard E. Pfündel, Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; Giovanni Agati, Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Firenze, Italy; and Zoran G. Cerovic, LURE-CNRS, Orsay, France.

7. Transport of lipophilic non-electrolytes across the cuticle.

Markus Riederer, Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; and Adrian A. Friedmann, Syngenta Inc, Bracknell, Berkshire, UK.

8. Characterisation of polar paths of transport in plant cuticles.

Lukas Schreiber, Ökophysiologie der Pflanzen, Botanisches Institut, Bonn, Germany.

9. Cuticular transpiration.

Markus Burghardt and Markus Riederer, Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften, Universität Würzburg, 082 Würzburg, Germany.

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10. The cuticle and cellular interactions.

Hirokazu Tanaka and Yasunori Machida, Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.

11. Microbial communities in the phyllosphere.

Johan H. J. Leveau, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology, Heteren, The Netherlands.

12. Filamentous fungi on plant surfaces.

Tim L. W. Carver, Plant Genetics and Breeding, IGER, Aberystwyth, UK; and.

Sarah J. Gurr, Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

13. Plant-Insect interactions on cuticular surfaces.

Caroline Müller, Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

""All authors are unmistakably experts in their respective fields, and the editors assembled top quality international representation, adding to the breadth of their volume.""

""It is a pleasure to study this meticulously edited volume, because each chapter is so well-organized and thoroughly documented with ample references. Research scientists and professionals from diverse disciplines, both academic and from the industrial sectors will derive benefit from this book.""

Dorothea Bedigian, Research Associate, Missouri Botanical Garden in Plant Science Bulletin, Volume 52, Number 4, 2006 (The Botanical Society of America)

""Another instalment from Blackwell Publishing's noteworthy Annual Plant Review Series. As always, it includes chapters on the latest research on us its subject written by experts in the field. This is the first experiment-based comprehensive scientific book devoted the plant cuticle since the 1970's that is not a compilation of conference proceedings...[and] is of interest to ecologists, environmental scientists, entomologists, and phytopathologists. In addition, information for horticultural scientists is included. This volume is excellent and long overdue source of information about the current research on the plant cuticle.""
Marissa N. Oppel in JournalBotanical Research, Volume 1, Issue 1, 2007

a state-of-the-art review of this important interdisciplinary area, in the light of the new techniques of molecular biology and analysis


the only book to reflect the multidisciplinary and integrative approach to the subject


focuses on the applied aspects of the field wherever appropriate


chapter authors are drawn from major international laboratories