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Attachment and Family Systems: Family Process, Volume 41, Number 3, Fall 2002

Attachment and Family Systems: Family Process, Volume 41, Number 3, Fall 2002

Beatrice Wood (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-12717-2

Oct 2002, Wiley-Blackwell

280 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$55.95

Description

This volume provides a comprehensive multidisciplinary and multinational view of attachment theory as it applies to family systems, and family systems theory as it extends attachment theory.

  • Explores if and how attachment theory can be truly systemic, and what a systemic attachment theory would entail

  • Addresses potential clinical implications and applications of attachment and family systems theories

  • Raises cultural challenges to integrative theoretical development

  • Challenges developmental and family systems scientists and practitioners to begin an active exchange
1. Introduction: Beatrice L. Wood (Children's Hospital of Buffalo).

2. The Network Perspective: An Integration of Attachment and Family Systems Theories: Kasia Kozlowska (The Children's Hospital at Westmead) and Lesley Hanney (Relationship Australia).

3. Attachment, Social Rank, and Affect Regulation: Speculations on an Ethological Approach to Family Interaction: Leon Sloman (University of Toronto), Leslie Atkinson (University of Toronto), Karen Milligan (University of Toronto) and Giovanni Liotti (Universita Pontificia Salesiana).

4. Family Systems Theory, Attachment Theory, and Culture: Fred Rothbaum (Tufts University), Karen Rosen (Boston College), Tatsuo Ujiie (Nagoya University), Nobuko Uchida (Ochanomizu University).

5. Observing Mother-Child Relationships Across Generations: Boundary Patterns, Attachment, and the Transmission of Caregiving: Molly D. Kretchmar (Gonzaga University) and Deborah B. Jacobvitz (University of Texas at Austin).

6. Relieving Parentified Children's Burdens in Families with Insecure Attachment Patterns: John Byng-Hall (Institute of Family Therapy).

7. Attachment, Mastery, and Interdependence: A Model of Parenting Process: Martha E. Edwards (Ackerman Institute for the Family).

8. Attachment Security in Couple Relationships: A Systemic Model and Its Implications for Family Dynamics: Mario Mikulincer (Bar-Ilan University), Victor Florian (Bar-Ilan University), Philip A. Cowan (University of California, Berkeley) and Carolyn Pape Cowan (University of California, Berkeley).

9. Balancing the Family and the Collective in Raising Children: Why Communal Sleeping in Kibbutzim Was Predestined to End: Ora Aviezer (University of Haifa), Abraham Sagi (University of Haifa) and Marinus van Ijzendoorn (Leiden University).

10. Attachment and Family Therapy: Clinical Utility of Adolescent-Family Attachment Research: Howard A. Liddle (University of Miami) and Seth J. Schwartz (University of Miami).

11. Attachment and Affect Regulation: A Framework for Family Treatment of Conduct Disorder: Margaret K. Keiley (Purdue University).

12. Depression and Attachment in Families: A Child-Focused Perspective: Melissa Herring (Emory University) and Nadine J. Kaslow (Emory University).

13. Links between Community Violence and the Family System: Evidence from Children's Feelings of Relatedness and Perceptions of Parent Behavior: Michael Lynch (SUNY Genesco) and Dante Cicchetti (University of Rochester).

14. The Epigenesis of the Family System as a Context for Individual Development: Herta A. Guttman (McGill University).

15. Cross-Cultural Perspectives: Implications for Attachment Theory and Family Therapy: Patricia Minuchin.

16. Conceptual Links between Byng-Hall's Theory of Parentification and the Emotional Security Hypothesis: Patrick T. Davies (University of Rochester)


  • Explores if and how attachment theory can be truly systemic, and what a systemic attachment theory would entail

  • Addresses potential clinical implications and applications of attachment and family systems theories

  • Raises cultural challenges to integrative theoretical development

  • Challenges developmental and family systems scientists and practitioners to begin an active exchange