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Beer and Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking

Beer and Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking

Steven D. Hales (Editor), Michael C. Jackson (Foreword by)

ISBN: 978-1-405-15430-7 November 2007 Wiley-Blackwell 248 Pages

 Paperback

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$27.95

Description

A beer-lovers' book which playfully examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer consumption.

  • Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities
  • Divided into four sections: The Art of the Beer; The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character; The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer; and Beer in the History of Philosophy
  • Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages as a medical cure; to inspect Immanuel Kant’s transcendental idealism through beer goggles, and to sort out Friedrich Nietzsche’s simultaneous praise and condemnation of intoxication
  • Written for beer-lovers who want to think while they drink

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Foreword: Michael Jackson.

Editor’s Introduction: Steven D. Hales (Bloomsburg University).

Part I: The Art of the Beer:.

1. Thirst for Authenticity: An Aesthetics of the Brewer’s Art: Dale Jacquette (Pennsylvania State University).

2. The Beer Matrix: Reality vs Facsimile in Brewing: Garrett Oliver (Brooklyn Brewery).

3. The Truth About Beer: Michael P. Lynch (University of Connecticut).

4. Good Beer, or How to Properly Dispute Taste: Peter Machamer (University of Pittsburgh).

5. Quality, Schmality: Talking Naturally about the Aesthetics of Beer; or, Why is American Beer So Lousy?: Martin Stack (Rockhurst University) and George Gale (University of Missouri).

6. Extreme Brewing in America: Sam Calagione (Dogfish Head Craft Brewing).

Part II: The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character:.

7. Mill v. Miller, or Higher and Lower Pleasures: Steven D. Hales (Bloomsburg University).

8. Beer and Autonomy: Alan McLeod (Senior Legal Counsel for the City of Kingston, Ontario).

9. Another Pitcher? On Beer, Friendship, and Character: Jason Kawall (Colgate University).

Part III: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer:.

10. Beer and Gnosis: The Mead of Inspiration: Theodore Schick (Muhlenberg College).

11. The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Beer: Neil A. Manson (University of Mississippi).

12. What’s a Beer Style?: Matt Dunn (University of Indiana at Bloomington).

Part IV: Beer in the History of Philosophy:.

13. Drink on, the Jolly Prelate Cries: David Hilbert (University of Illinois at Chicago).

14. Beer Goggles and Transcendental Idealism: Steven M. Bayne (Fairfield University).

15. Beyond Grolsch and Orval: Beer, Intoxication, and Power in Nietzsche’s Thought: Rex Welshon (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs).

Index

“Originally developed as the final installment in an Epicurean Trilogy the book stands on its own as a collection of essays on beer and its place in history its role in our lives and contributions to humanity” “Beer & Philosophy is a post exam tonic for those normally immersed in academic texts and a delightful diversion for your average post grad beer nerd” (Yankee Brew News)

“It turns out that not only have reputable psychologists at well-respected institutions done experimental studies on this effect, but it also serves as a kind of foul point for various philosophical questions. The works set out to address the intersection between philosophy and areas of everyday general concern: food, wine, and beer. In addition to straightforward philosophical discussions, the volumes include historical discussions, legal questions, some personal reflections. Beer and Philosophy … includes essays that encourage the next step of engaging philosophers themselves, has the fewest contributions with only a tangential link to philosophy … and discusses a wide range of issues.” (Gastronomica, Fall 2008)

"[T]his really is a superb and accessible book, that dares to take a different angle towards beer-writing. It’s funny, knowing and well-written and much recommended" (British Guild of Beer Writers, November 2007 Newsletter)

"Much of this book is well written and interesting as well as accessible for a casual reader coming across new and interesting ideas." (What's Brewing)

“A truly well rounded view…and a critical reflection on what and how we eat can contribute to a robust enjoyment of gastronomic pleasures.” (Gourmet Retailer)

“You’re bound to come away from the reading experiences forever changed in the way you think about beer.” (Celebrator Beer News)


  • Humourously examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer
    consumption
  • Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities
  • Divided into four sections: “The Art of the Beer”; “The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character”; “The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer”; and “Beer in the History of Philosophy”
  • Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages as a medical cure; to inspect Immanuel Kant’s transcendental idealism through beer goggles, and to sort out Friedrich Nietzsche’s simultaneous praise and condemnation of intoxication
  • Argues that beer drives the human condition, even if the human is in no condition to drive