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Behavioral Case Formulation and Intervention: A Functional Analytic Approach

Behavioral Case Formulation and Intervention: A Functional Analytic Approach

Peter Sturmey

ISBN: 978-0-470-01890-3

Sep 2008

346 pages

In Stock

$72.95

Description

There is a long history of behavioral approaches to psychopathology. Recent work, however, has focused instead on cognitive, psychodynamic and integrative approaches. Behavioral Case Formulation and Intervention redresses this imbalance by exploring radical behaviorism and its approach to the conceptualization, case formulation and treatment of psychopathology. Peter Sturmey describes the conceptual foundations of functional approaches to case formulation and intervention, explains the technology and application of behavioral assessment and hypothesis-driven intervention, and identifies outstanding and conceptual and practical problems within this framework.
About the Author.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

PART I: BEHAVIORISM AND BASIC LEARNING CONCEPTS.

Chapter 1: Structural and Functional Approaches to Case Formulation.

Chapter 2: Radical Behaviorism.

Chapter 3: Respondent Behavior.

Chapter 4: Operant Behavior I. Characteristics, Acquisition and Stimulus Control.

Chapter 5: Operant Behavior II. Satiation and Deprivation, Extinction, Shaping, Variability and Punishment.

Chapter 6: Complex Behavior I. Modeling, Chaining and Self-regulation

Chapter 7: Complex Behavior II. Rule Governed Behavior, Stimulus Equivalence and Verbal Behavior.

PART II: CASE FORMULATION.

Chapter 8: Non-behavioral approaches to case formulation.

Chapter 9: Wolpe’s Tradition of Case Formulation.

Chapter 10: Skinner and Psychotherapy.

Chapter 11: Behavioral Case Formulation.

Chapter 12: Behavioral Assessment.

Chapter 13: Outstanding Issues and Future Directions.

References.

Index.

?I would recommend this book to students of psychology, psychologists, psychology departments located in university and hospital settings, libraries in university and hospital settings, psychiatrists, social workers and health behavior departments in university settings.? (Drug and Alcohol Review , September 2009)