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Bioelectrochemical Interface Engineering

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Bioelectrochemical Interface Engineering

R. Navanietha Krishnaraj (Editor), Rajesh K. Sani (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-119-53854-7 September 2019 560 Pages

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Description

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and rules in bioelectrochemistry and explores latest advancements in the field

Bioelectrochemical Interface Engineering offers a guide to this burgeoning interdisciplinary field. The authors—noted experts on the topic—present a detailed explanation of the field’s basic concepts, provide a fundamental understanding of the principle of electrocatalysis, electrochemical activity of the electroactive microorganisms, and mechanisms of electron transfer at electrode-electrolyte interfaces. They also explore the design and development of bioelectrochemical systems.

The authors review recent advances in the field including: the development of new bioelectrochemical configurations, new electrode materials, electrode functionalization strategies, and extremophilic electroactive microorganisms. These current developments hold the promise of powering the systems in remote locations such as deep sea and extra-terrestrial space as well as powering implantable energy devices and controlled drug delivery. This important book:

•    Explores the fundamental concepts and rules in bioelectrochemistry and details the latest advancements

•    Presents principles of electrocatalysis, electroactive microorganisms, types and mechanisms of electron transfer at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, electron transfer kinetics in bioelectrocatalysis, and more

•    Covers microbial electrochemical systems and discusses bioelectrosynthesis and biosensors, and bioelectrochemical wastewater treatment

•    Reviews microbial biosensor, microfluidic and lab-on-chip devices, flexible electronics, and paper and stretchable electrodes

Written for researchers, technicians, and students in chemistry, biology, energy and environmental science, Bioelectrochemical Interface Engineering provides a strong foundation to this advanced field by presenting the core concepts, basic principles, and newest advances.

List of Contributors xxi

Preface xxix

1 Electrochemical Performance Analyses of Biofilms 1
J. Jayapriya and V. Ramamurthy

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Electrochemical Principles 1

1.3 Cyclic Voltammetry 2

1.4 Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy 7

1.5 Electrochemical Noise (ECN) Technique 14

1.6 Conclusion 17

Acknowledgments 17

References 17

Further Reading 19

Take‐home Message 19

Test Yourself 19

2 Direct Electron Transfer in Redox Enzymes and Microorganisms 21
Sheela Berchmans and T. Balamurugan

2.1 Introduction 21

2.2 Wiring Enzymes to the Electrode Surface 22

2.3 Wiring Microorganisms to the Electrode Surface 26

References 30

Take‐home Message 34

Test Yourself 34

3 Electrochemical Techniques and Applications to Characterize Single‐ and Multicellular Electric Microbial Functions 37
Junki Saito, Muralidharan Murugan, Xiao Deng, Alexis Guionet, Waheed Miran, and Akihiro Okamoto

3.1 Introduction to Microbial Electrochemical Functions and Processes 37

3.2 Electrochemical Techniques Related to Single‐cell Processes 38

3.3 Electrochemical Techniques Related to Biofilm Processes 43

3.4 Techniques to Analyze Nanowires 45

References 48

Take‐home Message 52

Test Yourself 52

4 Electrochemical Analysis of Single Cells 55
Maedeh Mozneb, Christine Smothers, Pablo Rodriguez, and Chen‐Zhong Li

4.1 Introduction 55

4.2 Single‐cell Analysis Applications and Current Technologies 56

4.3 Electrochemical Methods for Single‐cell Analysis 57

4.4 Microelectrodes for Single‐cell Analysis 62

4.5 Electroluminescence‐based Single‐cell Measurements 69

4.6 Lab‐on‐chip‐based Single‐cell Analysis 70

4.7 Conclusion 71

References 71

Take‐home Message 75

Test Yourself 76

5 Biocorrosion 77
C. Chandrasatheesh and J. Jayapriya

5.1 Introduction 77

5.2 Microorganisms Involved in Corrosion 78

5.3 Mechanisms 80

5.4 Biocorrosion Control Strategies 82

5.5 Materials Vulnerable to Biocorrosion 83

5.6 Biocorrosion of Biomedical Implants 84

5.7 Biocorrosion Detection Techniques 85

5.8 Conclusion 86

Acknowledgements 86

References 86

Further Reading 89

Take‐home Message 89

Test Yourself 90

6 Microbial Fuel Cells: A Sustainable Technology for Pollutant Removal and Power Generation 91
Somdipta Bagchi and Manaswini Behera

6.1 Introduction 91

6.2 Microbial Fuel Cells 92

6.3 Measuring Performance 94

6.4 MFC Configuration 98

6.5 Materials 100

6.6 Limitations in MFCs 104

6.7 Other MFC‐based Technologies 106

6.8 Pilot‐scale MFCs 107

References 108

Take‐home Message 115

Test Yourself 115

7 Biophotovoltaics: Molecular Mechanisms and Applications 117
Angelaalincy Maria Joseph, Sangeetha Ramalingam, Pushpalatha Selvaraj, Komal Rani, Kalpana Ramaraju, Gunaseelan Sathaiah, Ashokkumar Balasubramaniem, and Varalakshmi Perumal

7.1 Introduction 117

7.2 Photocurrent Generation with Biological Catalysts 118

7.3 Photosynthetic Microbes as Photobioelectrocatalysts in BESs 119

7.4 Biocatalysts of Photosynthetic Organisms 119

7.5 Electron Transfer in Microalgae During Photosynthesis (Light Reaction) 120

7.6 Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria 124

7.7 Electron Transfer Mechanisms of Cyanobacteria 128

7.8 Models of Solar Energy Conversion Devices 129

7.9 Applications and Future Perspectives 131

7.10 Conclusion 132

References 132

Take‐home Message 135

Test Yourself 135

8 An Insight into Plant Microbial Fuel Cells 137
Pranab Jyoti Sarma and Kaustubha Mohanty

8.1 Introduction 137

8.2 Different Types of Plants and Their Bioelectricity Generation Capabilities 138

8.3 Bioprocess Structure 139

8.4 Variation in PMFC Types, Operating Conditions, Design, Electrodes, and Membranes Used 141

8.5 PMFCs as New Electricity Generation Technology 142

8.6 Challenges of PMFCs 144

8.7 Conclusion 144

References 144

Take‐home Message 146

Test Yourself 147

9 Electroanalytical Techniques for Investigating Biofilms in Microbial Fuel Cells 149
Smita S. Kumar, Vivek Kumar, and Suddhasatwa Basu

9.1 Introduction 149

9.2 Conventional Biofilm Investigation Techniques 151

9.3 Electroanalytical Techniques 151

9.4 Electrode Polarization 154

9.5 Voltammetry (LSV) 155

9.6 Scanning Tunneling Microscopy 159

9.7 Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (e‐QCM) 159

9.8 Conclusion 160

Acknowledgments 160

References 160

Take‐home Message 162

Test Yourself 162

10 Progress in Development of Electrode Materials in Microbial Fuel Cells 165
Alka Pareek and S. Venkata Mohan

10.1 Introduction 165

10.2 Electrode Materials in MFCs 166

10.3 Effect of Surface Treatment on Electrodes 176

10.4 Conclusion 177

Acknowledgments 177

References 178

Take‐home Message 185

Test Yourself 185

11 Synthetic Biology Strategies to Improve Electron Transfer Rate at the Microbe–Anode Interface in Microbial Fuel Cells 187
Tian Zhang, Dipankar Ghosh, and Pier‐Luc Tremblay

11.1 Introduction 187

11.2 Extracellular Electron Transfer (EET) Mechanisms from the Microbe to the Anode 188

11.3 Synthetic Biology Strategies to Improve the EET Rate from Microbes to Anode 193

11.4 Synthetic Biology to Optimize Current Generation by Yeast 199

11.5 Conclusion 200

References 200

Take‐home Message 207

Test Yourself 208

12 Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs): A Promising and Green Approach for Bioenergy and Biochemical Production from Waste Resources 209
Abudukeremu Kadier, Mohd Sahaid Kalil, Pankaj Kumar Rai, Smita S. Kumar, Peyman Abdeshahian, Periyasamy Sivagurunathan, Hassimi Abu Hasan, Aidil Abdul Hamid, and Azah Mohamed

12.1 Introduction 209

12.2 Fundamentals of MEC Technology 210

12.3 Crucial Factors Governing the Performance of MECs 212

12.4 Current Applications of MECs 219

12.5 Conclusion 224

Acknowledgments 224

References 224

Take‐home Message 234

Test Yourself 234

13 Microbial Desalination Cells 235
Swati Sharma, Ademola Hammed, and Halis Simsek

13.1 Introduction 235

13.2 Overview of Desalination Cells 236

13.3 MDC Applications and Concepts 237

13.4 Desalination in MDCs 239

13.5 Different Configurations of MDCs 239

13.6 Conclusion 246

References 246

Take‐home Message 248

Test Yourself 248

14 Microbially Charged Redox Flow Batteries for Bioenergy Storage 251
Márcia S.S. Santos, Luciana Peixoto, Célia Dias‐Ferreira, Adélio Mendes, and M. Madalena Alves

14.1 Introduction 251

14.2 Redox Flow Batteries 251

14.3 Organic Compounds for RFBs 256

14.4 Coupling RFBs with Renewable Energy Production Technologies 259

14.5 Future Perspectives 261

14.6 Conclusion 262

Acknowledgments 262

References 262

Take‐home Message 268

Test Yourself 269

15 Artificial Photosynthesis: Current Advances and Challenges 271
Joanna Kargul and Małgorzata Kiliszek

15.1 Introduction 271

15.2 Basic Principles of Natural Photosynthesis 272

15.3 Artificial Photosynthetic Systems 277

15.4 Strategies for Improvement of Photoelectrode Performance 287

15.5 Operational Dye‐sensitized Solar Cells and Solar‐to‐Fuel Devices 289

15.6 Conclusion 291

Acknowledgments 292

References 292

Take‐home Message 308

Abbreviations 308

Test Yourself 309

16 Bioelectrochemical Systems for Production of Valuable Compounds 311
Luciana Peixoto, Sónia G. Barbosa, M. Madalena Alves, and Maria Alcina Pereira

16.1 Introduction 311

16.2 From Electricity to Product 313

16.3 Conclusion 318

Acknowledgments 318

References 318

Take‐home Message 323

Test Yourself 323

17 Modernization of Biosensing Strategies for the Development of Lab‐on‐Chip Integrated Systems 325
Sharmili Roy, Shweta J. Malode, Nagaraj P. Shetti, and Pranjal Chandra

17.1 Introduction 325

17.2 Types of Biosensors 326

17.3 Lab‐on‐Chip Technologies 334

17.4 Conclusion 336

Acknowledgment 336

References 336

Take‐home Message 341

Test Yourself 341

18 Electrochemical Immunosensors: Working Principle, Types, Scope, Applications, and Future Prospects 343
Shakila Harshavardhan, Sam Ebenezer Rajadas, Kevin Kumar Vijayakumar, Willsingh Anbu Durai, Andy Ramu, and Rajan Mariappan

18.1 Introduction 343

18.2 Immunosensors in Protein Immunoassays 345

18.3 Types of Immunosensors 346

18.4 Impedimetric Immunosensors 348

18.5 Potentiometric Immunosensors 352

18.6 Voltammetric and Amperometric Immunosensors 353

18.7 Conductometric Immunosensors 355

18.8 Capacitive Immunosensors 356

18.9 Role of Nanomaterials in Immunosensors 357

18.10 Applications of Immunosensors 358

18.11 Conclusion 360

References 361

Take‐home Message 368

Test Yourself 368

19 Recent Updates on Inkjet‐Printed Sensors 371
Naresh Kumar Mani, Anusha Prabhu, and Annamalai Senthil Kumar

19.1 Introduction 371

19.2 Inkjet‐Printed Electrochemical‐Based Sensors 372

19.3 Inkjet‐Printed Colorimetric‐based Sensors 377

19.4 Inkjet‐Printed Fluorescence‐based Sensors 378

19.5 Other Techniques and Developed Devices 379

19.6 Summary and Future Perspectives 381

Acknowledgments 381

References 381

Take‐home Message 384

Test Yourself 384

20 Electrochemical Systems for Healthcare Applications 385
Pandiaraj Manickam, Vairamani Kanagavel, Apurva Sonawane, S.P. Thipperudraswamy, and Shekhar Bhansali

20.1 Introduction 385

20.2 Point‐of‐care Sensor Systems 386

20.3 Wearable Electrochemical Systems 393

20.4 Implantable Electrochemical Nanodevices 401

20.5 Conclusion 405

Acknowledgments 405

References 405

Take‐home Message 409

Test Yourself 409

21 Synthetic Strategies of Nanobioconjugates for Bioelectrochemical Applications 411
T. Selvamani, D. Gangadharan, and Sambandam Anandan

21.1 Introduction 411

21.2 Fabrication Processes of Nanobioconjugated Systems 412

21.3 Applications of Nanobioconjugates 423

21.4 Conclusion 426

References 426

Take‐home Message 429

Test Yourself 429

22 Electrochemical Biosensors with Nanointerface for Food, Water Quality, and Healthcare Applications 431
John Bosco Balaguru Rayappan, Noel Nesakumar, Lakshmishri Ramachandra Bhat, Manju Bhargavi Gumpu, K. Jayanth Babu, and Arockia Jayalatha JBB

22.1 Introduction 431

22.2 Enzymatic Redox‐type Biosensors 440

22.3 Water 446

22.4 Enzymatic Inhibition–type Biosensors 452

22.5 Water Quality 455

22.6 Conclusion 456

Acknowledgments 457

References 457

Take‐home Message 466

Test Yourself 467

23 Enzymatic Electrode–Electrolyte Interface Study During Electrochemical Sensing of Biomolecules 469
Ashish Kumar, Priya Singh, and Rajiv Prakash

23.1 Introduction 469

23.2 Conducting Substrates for Sensing Applications 470

23.3 Sensing Techniques 472

23.4 Electrochemical Techniques for Sensing Analytes 472

23.5 Different Modified Electrodes for Enzyme Functionalization 474

23.6 A Plausible Mechanism of Electron Transfer: An Electrochemical Equivalent Circuit Analysis 474

23.7 Enzyme‐less Glucose Oxidation: Off Course for a New Generation? 476

23.8 Conclusion 477

References 477

Take‐home Message 483

Test Yourself 483

24 Quantum Dots for Bioelectrochemical Applications 485
İlker Polatoğlu, Erdal Eroğlu, and Levent Aydın

24.1 Introduction 485

24.2 Nanotechnology 485

24.3 Structure of QDs 486

24.4 Characteristics of QDs 487

24.5 Synthesis Processes 488

24.6 Electrochemical Sensing of QDs 489

24.7 Biosensor Technology 490

24.8 Bioelectrochemical Applications of QDs 491

24.9 QDs: Modeling and Optimizations 494

24.10 Conclusion 498

References 498

Take‐home Message 502

Test Yourself 502

25 Enzymatic Self‐powered Biosensing Devices 505
Felismina T.C. Moreira, Manuela F. Frasco, Sónia G. Barbosa, Luciana Peixoto, M. Madalena Alves, and M. Goreti F. Sales

25.1 Enzymatic Fuel Cells 505

25.2 Electron Transfer Mechanisms 505

25.3 Enzyme Immobilization 507

25.4 EFC‐based Biosensors 509

25.5 Conclusion 514

Acknowledgments 515

References 515

Take‐home Message 519

Test Yourself 519

Index 521