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Biosocial Matters: Rethinking the Sociology-Biology Relations in the Twenty-First Century

Biosocial Matters: Rethinking the Sociology-Biology Relations in the Twenty-First Century

Maurizio Meloni, Simon J. Williams, Paul Martin

ISBN: 978-1-119-23651-1

Nov 2016, Wiley-Blackwell

288 pages

Select type: Paperback

$34.95

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Description

Biosocial Matters: Rethinking the Sociology-Biology Relations in the Twenty-First Century features a collection of readings from scholars on the vanguard of a reframing of biology/society debates within the sociological disciplines.

  • Brings together voices who are contributing to a reframing of the biology/sociology debate within sociology and sister disciplines such as anthropology, history, and philosophy
  • Gathers theoretical and historically-oriented contributions to gain an understanding of the current renegotiation of the biological/social boundaries
  • Presents in-depth analyses of two frontiers of ongoing biology/sociology debates: epigenetics and neuroscience
  • Reveals how a new biosocial terrain can revitalize both sociology and the biological imagination

Editorial introduction

1. The biosocial: sociological themes and issues (Maurizio Meloni, Simon Williams and Paul Martin)

Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences

2. Thinking about biology and culture: can the natural and human sciences be integrated? (Evelyn Fox Keller)

3. Cultural epigenetics (Eva Jablonka)

4. From boundary-work to boundary object: how biology left and re-entered the social sciences (Maurizio Meloni)

5. The social as signal in the body of chromatin (Hannah Landecker)

Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects

6. Unstable bodies: biosocial perspectives on human variation (Gisli Palsson)

7. The turn to biology (Tim Newton)

8. Organizing the organism: a re-casting of the bio-social interface for our times (Steve Fuller)

9. New bottles for new wine: Julian Huxley, biology and sociology in Britain (Chris Renwick)

Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience

10. Social epigenetics: a science of social science? (Emma Chung, John Cromby, Dimitris Papadopoulos and Cristina Tufarelli)

11. Epistemic modesty, ostentatiousness and the uncertainties of epigenetics: on the knowledge machinery of (social) science (Martyn Pickersgill)

12. The epigenomic self in personalized medicine: between responsibility and empowerment (Luca Chiapperino and Giuseppe Testa)

13. Living well in the Neuropolis (Des Fitzgerald, Nikolas Rose and Ilina Singh)

14. The nature of structure: a biosocial approach (John Bone)

15. The challenges of new biopsychosocialities: hearing voices, trauma, epigenetics and mediated perception (Lisa Blackman)

Notes on contributors

Index