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Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?

Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?

Jacqueline Bhabha

ISBN: 978-1-509-51940-8

May 2018, Polity

140 pages

Out of stock

$12.95

Description

Every minute 24 people are forced to leave their homes and over 65 million are currently displaced world-wide. Small wonder that tackling the refugee and migration crisis has become a global political priority.

But can this crisis be resolved and if so, how? In this compelling essay, renowned human rights lawyer and scholar Jacqueline Bhabha explains why forced migration demands compassion, generosity and a more vigorous acknowledgement of our shared dependence on human mobility as a key element of global collaboration. Unless we develop humane 'win-win' strategies for tackling the inequalities and conflicts driving migration and for addressing the fears fuelling xenophobia, she argues, both innocent lives and cardinal human rights principles will be squandered in the service of futile nationalism and oppressive border control.

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  • Acknowledgements
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 - A Crisis Like No Other?
  • Chapter 2 - A Duty of Care
  • Chapter 3 - The System at Breaking Point
  • Chapter 4 - Finding Workable and Humane Solutions
  • References
  • Further Reading
“Jacqueline Bhabha has long been one of the most astute observers of forced migration. Here, she brings her insight to bear on this great issue of our time, offering original and compelling ways of rethinking the challenges ahead.” Matthew J. Gibney, University of Oxford

“This readable yet impressively researched book provides a comprehensive account of how we should think about one of the most complex and urgent problems of our time.”
Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland, former UN Commissioner for Human Rights and President of the Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice

"This book is an insightful and passionate argument for finding a humane resolution to the problems that cause and attend distress migration."
Publishers Weekly