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Carbon Dioxide Thermodynamic Properties Handbook: Covering Temperatures from -20 Degrees to 250 Degrees Celcius and Pressures up to 1000 bar

Carbon Dioxide Thermodynamic Properties Handbook: Covering Temperatures from -20 Degrees to 250 Degrees Celcius and Pressures up to 1000 bar

Sara Anwar, John J. Carroll

ISBN: 978-1-118-06569-3

Mar 2011

568 pages

Select type: O-Book

Description

The largest and most comprehensive collection of thermodynamic data on carbon dioxide ever produced, this volume is now the ONLY book of its kind in print.  With carbon dioxide sequestration gaining in popularity around the world in the scientific and engineering communities, having this data in an easy-to-access format is more useful and timely than ever. 

With data that is accurate down to within a fraction of a degree, this handbook offers, in one volume, literally thousands of data points that any engineer or chemist would need when dealing with carbon dioxide.  Not available in other formats, these easy-to-read tables are at your fingertips and are accessed within seconds and does away with the need for constantly working with mathematical formulas. 

Carbon dioxide is used in many fields, across many industries, including the oil and gas industry and food processing.  Even coffee is decaffeinated using carbon dioxide!  Though CO2 has many uses in industry, it is also one of the most offensive of the greenhouse gases, on which many scientists and engineers are working to eradicate in the future production of power and fuel.

Acknowledgement.

Preface.

Introduction.

1. Density (kg/m3) of Saturated Carbon Dioxide.

2. Enthalpy (J/mol) of Saturated Carbon Dioxide.

3. Entropy (J/mol•K) of Saturated Carbon Dioxide.

4. Heat Capacity, Cp, (J/mol•K) of Saturated Carbon Dioxide.

5. Density (kg/m3) of Carbon Dioxide as a Function of Temperature and Pressure.

6. Enthalpy (J/mol) of Carbon Dioxide as a Function of Temperature and Pressure.

7. Entropy (J/mol•K) of Carbon Dioxide as a Function of Temperature and Pressure.

8. Heat Capacity, Cp, (J/mol•K) of Carbon Dioxide as a Function of Temperature and Pressure.

""Anwar and Caroll, with a gas engineering company in Calgary, Canada, have compiled the most comprehensive collection of data on the thermodynamic properties of carbon dioxide ever published."" (Booknews, 1 June 2011)