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Causal Attribution: From Cognitive Processes to Collective Beliefs

Causal Attribution: From Cognitive Processes to Collective Beliefs

Miles Hewstone

ISBN: 978-0-631-17165-2

Jan 1991, Wiley-Blackwell

332 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$73.95

Description

Attribution theory deals with how people explain social behavior - their causal attributions or common-sense explanations. Causal Attribution provides a major assessment of attribution theory in social psychology during the last forty years. It reviews in detail the variety of theoretical perspectives and established phenomena in attribution theory and provides a unique integration.

A brief introduction to the classic attribution theories is followed by a review of some of the fundamental questions. The core of the book is made up of four central chapters, one on each of Doise's levels of explanation. Intra-personal attribution has studied the logic, cognitive processes and knowledge structures underlying causal attributions. Interpersonal attribution centers on attribution in social interaction and in close relationships, especially marriage. Intergroup attribution highlights the consequences of social categorization: attributions at this level often favor the ingroup and sustain ingroup conflict. Societal attributions link attributions to wider social beliefs, such as conspiracy theories, and refer to phenomena such as poverty, unemployment and riots.

This volume emphasizes the breadth and depth of attribution research, and argues persuasively that an attributional approach has a promising future, as well as a distinguished past, in social psychology.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

1. Introduction.

2. Classic Theories of Causal Attribution.

3. Attribution Theory and Research: Fundamental Questions.

4. Intra-personal Attribution: Causal Logic, Cognitive Processes and Knowledge Structures.

5. Interpersonal Attribution: From Social Interaction to Close Relationships.

6. Intergroup Attribution: Social Categorization and Its Consequences.

7. Societal Attribution: Collective Beliefs and the Explanation of Societal Events.

8. Conclusion.

References.

Author and subject indexes.

"An interesting and clear introduction and, at the same time, a sophisticated and up-to-date review of theoretical and empirical issues .... The novice will value it for its clarity while the expert will find in it fresh insights derived from Miles Hewstone's theoretical integration." Professor Klaus Fiedler, University of Giessen

"This volume presents some of the most thoughtful and challenging analyses of theory and research in contemporary attribution that can be found anywhere in the literature. The book is timely, filled with discussions of key research issues, and amazingly up-to-date in references provide." Professor John H. Harvey, University of Iowa

* The first single author review of the topic for 30 years.
* A uniquely broad and detailed review.
* Comprehensive coverage of American and European research.
* Author internationally recognised as an authority in the field.
* Editor of very successful textbook `Introduction to Social Psychology' (BBL, 1988).
* The first single author review of the topic for 30 years.
* A uniquely broad and detailed review.
* Comprehensive coverage of American and European research.
* Author internationally recognised as an authority in the field.
* Editor of very successful textbook `Introduction to Social Psychology' (BBL, 1988).