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Chemical Biology: From Small Molecules to Systems Biology and Drug Design

Chemical Biology: From Small Molecules to Systems Biology and Drug Design

Stuart L. Schreiber (Editor), Tarun M. Kapoor (Editor), Günther Wess (Editor)

ISBN: 978-3-527-61937-5

Apr 2008

1280 pages

Select type: Wiley Online Book

Description

Edited by the world leaders in this emerging field, this three-volume handbook is designed to become the landmark reference on this exciting new branch of chemistry and biology.
Following an introductory section, the authors discuss the use of small molecules to explore biology, discovering small molecule probes for biological mechanisms and expanding the scope of chemical synthesis. Further sections cover chemical informatics, drug discovery and systems biology, and the whole work is rounded off by the outlook and perspectives for this field.
No academic institution or pharmaceutical company can possibly miss out on this highly authoritative work.
PART I: INTRODUCTION
Chemistry and Biology -- Historial and Philosophical Aspects (Gerhard Quinkert, Frankfurt University)

PART II: USING SMALL MOLECULES TO EXPLORE BIOLOGY
Using Small Molecules to Unravel Biological Mechanisms (Tarun Kapoor, Rockefeller University)
Using Natural Products to Unravel Cell Biology (Craig Crews, Yale University)
Engineering Control Over Protein Function Using Chemistry (Kevan Shokat, UC San Francisco)
Controlling Protein Function by Caged Compounds (Carsten Schultz, EMBL Heidelberg)
Transcription Control by Small-Molecules (John Koh, University of Delaware)
Controlling Protein-Protein Interactions (Virginia Cornish, Columbia University)
Controlling Protein-Protein Interactions Using Chemical Inducers and Disrupters of Dimerization (Tim Clackson, Ariad Pharmaceuticals)
Protein Secondary Structure Mimetics as Modulators of Protein-Protein and Protein-Ligand Interactions (Andrew Hamilton, Yale University)
Expanding the Genetic Code (Masahiko Sisido, Okayama University)

PART III: DISCOVERING SMALL MOLECULE PROBES FOR BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS
Forward Chemical Genetics (Stuart Schreiber & Steve Haggarty, Harvard University)
Reverse Chemical Genetics -- An Important Strategy for the Study of Protein Function in Chemical and Drug Discovery (Herbert Waldmann, MPI Dortmund)
Chemical Biology and Enzymology: Protein Phosphorylation as a Case Study (Phil Cole, Johns Hopkins University)
Chemical Strategies for Activity-based Proteomics (Ben Cravatt, Scripps Intitute)
The Biarsenical Tetracysteine Protein Tag: Chemistry and Biological Applications (Steve Adams, UC San Diego)
Chemical Approaches to Exploit Fusion Proteins for Functional Studies (Kai Johnsson, EPF Lausanne)

PART IV. EXPANDING THE SCOPE OF CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS
Diversity-oriented Synthesis (Derek Tan, Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
Combinatorial Biosynthesis of Polyketides and Nonribosomal Peptides (Chaitan Khosla, Stanford University)
Expressed Protein Ligation (Tom Muir, Rockefeller University)
Chemical Synthesis of Proteins and Large Bioconjugates (Phil Dawson, Scripps Institute)
New Methods for Protein Bioconjugation (Matt Francis, UC Berkeley)
The Search for Chemical Probes to Illuminate Carbohydrate Function (Laura Kiessling, University of Wisconsin)
Chemical Clydomics as Basis for Drug Discovery (Peter Seeberger, ETH Zurich)
The Bicyclid Depsipeptide Family of Histone Deacetylase (A. Ganesan, University of Southampton)

PART V: CHEMICAL INFORMATICS

Chemical Informatics (Paul Clemons, Harvard University)
WOMBAT and WOMBAT-PK: Bioactivity Databases for Lead and Drug Discovery (Tudor Oprea, University of New Mexico)

PART VI: DRUG DISCOVERY

Managerial Challenges in Implementing Chemical Biology Platforms (Frank Douglas, MIT)
The Molecular Basis of Predicting Druggability (Andrew Hopkins, Pfizer)
The Target Family Approach (Peter Nestler, Sanofi-Aventis)
Chemical Biology of Kinases Studied by NMR Spectroscopy (Harald Schwalbe, Frankfurt University)
The Nuclear Receptor Superfamily and Drug Discovery (Kenneth Pearce, GSK)
The GPCR-7TM Receptor Target Family (Edgar Jacoby, Novartis)
Drugs Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions (Patrick Chene, Novartis)

PART VII: SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

Prediction of ADMET properties (Ulf Norinder, AstraZeneca)
Systems Biology of the JAK-STAT Signaling Pathway (Jens Timmer, Freiburg University)
Modeling Intracellular Signal Transduction Processes (Jason Haugh, NCSU)
Genome-wide Gene Expression and Application to the Analysis of T-Cell Subsets in Inflammatory Diseases (Lars Rogge, Institut Pasteur)
Scanning the Proteome for Targets of Organic Small Molecules Using Bifunctional Receptor Ligands (Nikolai Kley, GPC Biotech)

PART VIII: OUTLOOK

Chemical Biology -- An Outlook
by Günther Wess (National Research Center for Environment and Health)
""The text as a whole gives a thorough picture of the field and would be a welcome addition to the libraries of chemical biologistic from the graduate level and up in both academic and industrial settings…this is an excellent summary of the current state-of-the-art of the application of vibrational spectroscopy to the study of polymetric systems."" (Journal of the American Chemical Society, April 2008)

""...Overall, there is no doubt that these three volumes will be the authoritative reference for those already working in the field and researchers wanting to get acquainted with the various topics in chemical biology. The informationen is clearly given by leading figures in each subdiscipline of chemical biology, and the reader can go straight to the chapter of interest. The book could also serve as support for teaching.""
ChemBioChem, 07/2007

""...I found the book very stimulating, also in fields where I do not feel at home. It can also be used as a refernce book for the aread of chemical biology that are covered. I recommend it for a readership taht extends from then advanced PhD student with an interest in the subject to scientists already working in the field.""
Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 10/2007

""In general, this compendium is very well-written and produced, although some figures are too small to be useful.""  (Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, November 2007)