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Chotti Munda and His Arrow

Chotti Munda and His Arrow

Mahasweta Devi, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (Translated by)

ISBN: 978-1-405-10705-1

Feb 2003

328 pages

In Stock

$46.95

Description

Written in 1980, this novel by prize-winning Indian writer Mahasweta Devi, translated and introduced by Gayatri Chakravorty Sprivak, is remarkable for the way in which it touches on vital issues that have in subsequent decades grown into matters of urgent social conern.

  • Written by one of India’s foremost novelists, and translated by an eminent cultural and critical theorist.
  • Ranges over decades in the life of Chotti – the central character – in which India moves from colonial rule to independence, and then to the unrest of the 1970s.
  • Traces the changes, some forced, some welcome, in the daily lives of a marginalized rural community.
  • Raises questions about the place of the tribal on the map of national identity, land rights and human rights, the ‘museumization’ of ‘ethnic’ cultures, and the justifications of violent resistance as the last resort of a desperate people.
  • Represents enlightening reading for students and scholars of postcolonial literature and postcolonial studies.
Translator’s Foreword.

1. ‘Telling History’: An Interview with Mahasweta Devi.

2. Chotti Munda and his Arrow.

Translator’s Afterword.

Notes.

“The importance of Ray’s book lies in its active transgression of the kind of knowledge-project that can and must be performed by a beginner’s guide. In this respect, her book works as an excellent pathway into the complex textures of Spivak’s own writings.”  (Cultural Critique, 2012)

 


  • Written by one of India’s foremost novelists, and translated by an eminent cultural and critical theorist.

  • Ranges over decades in the life of Chotti – the central character – in which India moves from colonial rule to independence, and then to the unrest of the 1970s.

  • Traces the changes, some forced, some welcome, in the daily lives of a marginalized rural community.

  • Raises questions about the place of the tribal on the map of national identity, land rights and human rights, the ‘museumization’ of ‘ethnic’ cultures, and the justifications of violent resistance as the last resort of a desperate people.

  • Represents enlightening reading for students and scholars of postcolonial literature and postcolonial studies.