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City Logistics 3: Towards Sustainable and Liveable Cities

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City Logistics 3: Towards Sustainable and Liveable Cities

Eiichi Taniguchi (Editor), Russell G. Thompson (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-119-52772-5 May 2018 Wiley-ISTE 400 Pages

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This volume of three books presents recent advances in modelling, planning and evaluating city logistics for sustainable and liveable cities based on the application of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) and ITS (Intelligent Transport Systems). It highlights modelling the behaviour of stakeholders who are involved in city logistics as well as planning and managing policy measures of city logistics including cooperative freight transport systems in public-private partnerships. Case studies of implementing and evaluating city logistics measures in terms of economic, social and environmental benefits from major cities around the world are also given.

Preface xv

Chapter 1. Integrating Direct and Reverse Logistics in a “Living Lab” Context: Evaluating Stakeholder Acceptability and the Potential of Gamification to Foster Sustainable Urban Freight Transport 1
Valerio GATTA, Edoardo MARCUCCI, Michela LE PIRA and Andrea CICCORELLI

1.1. Introduction 1

1.2. CITYLAB: city logistics in living laboratories 4

1.2.1. Integrating direct and reverse logistics in a living lab context: the case of Rome 5

1.2.2. The role of gamification to foster sustainable urban freight transport 7

1.3. Data/methodology . 8

1.3.1. Plastic cap collection at the University of Roma Tre 8

1.3.2. Stated choice experiments 10

1.3.3. Discrete choice models 11

1.4. Results 11

1.4.1. Policy implications 16

1.5. Conclusion 17

1.6. Acknowledgements 17

1.7. Bibliography 18

Chapter 2. Optimizing the Establishment of a Central City Transshipment Facility to Ameliorate Last-Mile Delivery: a Case Study in Melbourne CBD 23
Khalid ALJOHANI and Russell G. THOMPSON

2.1. Introduction 23

2.2. Literature review 25

2.2.1. Recent trends and challenges affecting last-mile delivery 25

2.2.2. rational challenges in last-mile freight in the central city area 26

2.2.3. Establish small-scale logistics facilities in the central city area 26

2.3. Overview of methodology 28

2.4. Results and analysis of the observational study of loading activities in Melbourne CBD 28

2.5. Framework to establish Central City Transshipment Facility in the central city area 35

2.5.1. Description of framework 35

2.5.2. Stages of integrated framework 36

2.6. Conclusion 43

2.7. Bibliography 43

Chapter 3. Simulation of a City Logistics Solution for Montreal 47
Marguerite SIMO, Teodor Gabriel CRAINIC and Yvon BIGRAS

3.1. Introduction 47

3.2. Literature review 48

3.2.1. Different types of model classification 48

3.2.2. Different models for urban freight 49

3.3. Methodology 51

3.3.1. The initial national model 51

3.3.2. Modifying model 53

3.4. Results 56

3.4.1. Base case scenario 56

3.4.2. Scenario 1 57

3.4.3. Scenario 2 58

3.4.4. Scenario 3 59

3.5. Conclusion 61

3.6. Acknowledgements 61

3.7. Bibliography 62

Chapter 4. Simulation Applied to Urban Logistics: A State of the Art 65
Sarra JLASSI, Simon TAMAYO and Arthur GAUDRON

4.1. Introduction 65

4.1.1. Modeling versus simulation 66

4.2. Research method 67

4.3. Analytical framework 72

4.3.1. Simulation techniques used in different types of problems 72

4.3.2. Software solutions 80

4.3.3. Research opportunities 80

4.4. Conclusion 81

4.5. Acknowledgements 83

4.6. Bibliography 83

Chapter 5. Can the Crowd Deliver? Analysis of Crowd Logistics’ Types and Stakeholder Support 89
Heleen BULDEO RAI, Sara VERLINDE, Jan MERCKX and Cathy MACHARIS

5.1. Introduction 89

5.2. Literature review 91

5.3. Methodology 94

5.4. Results 96

5.5. Conclusion 103

5.6. Acknowledgements 104

5.7. Bibliography 105

Chapter 6. Preliminary Investigation of a Crowdsourced Package Delivery System: A Case Study 109
Sudheer BALLARE and Jane LIN

6.1. Introduction 109

6.2. Overview of the case study 111

6.2.1. Types of delivery service 111

6.2.2. Pricing model 112

6.3. Research questions 113

6.3.1. Data 114

6.3.2. Analysis findings 117

6.4. Further discussion 123

6.4.1. Market opportunities 123

6.4.2. Qualitative assessment of service 124

6.5. Conclusion 125

6.6. Acknowledgements 125

6.7. Bibliography 126

Chapter 7. Concepts of an Integrated Platform for Innovative City Logistics with Urban Consolidation Centers and Transshipment Points 129
Eiichi TANIGUCHI, Rémy DUPAS, Jean-Christophe DESCHAMPS and Ali Gul QURESHI

7.1. Introduction 129

7.2. Concepts of integrated platform for city logistics 130

7.3. Surveys on opinions about UCC and transshipment 132

7.3.1. Questionnaire 132

7.3.2. Results 133

7.4. Urban consolidation centers in Tokyo and Bordeaux 137

7.4.1. UCC in Tokyo 137

7.4.2. UCC in Bordeaux 139

7.5. Implementation issues 141

7.6. Conclusion 144

7.7. Acknowledgements 145

7.8. Bibliography 145

Chapter 8. E-Consumers and Their Perception of Automated Parcel Stations 147
Sara VERLINDE, César ROJAS, Heleen BULDEO RAI, Bram KIN and Cathy MACHARIS

8.1. Introduction 147

8.2. Literature review 149

8.3. Methodology 151

8.4. Results 154

8.4.1. Delivery preferences of online consumers 154

8.4.2. Attitude toward automated parcel stations 155

8.4.3. Expectations and use of automated parcel stations 155

8.5. Conclusion 157

8.6. Bibliography 158

Chapter 9. Loading/Unloading Space Location and Evaluation: An Approach through Real Data 161
Simon TAMAYO, Arthur GAUDRON and Arnaud DE LA FORTELLE

9.1. Introduction 161

9.2. Proposed approach 163

9.2.1. Data collection 164

9.2.2. Demand generation 165

9.2.3. Optimization model 168

9.3. Application and findings 173

9.3.1. Data collection and demand generation 173

9.3.2. Location of 10 L/U spaces if there are no prior spaces in the area 174

9.3.3. Location of two new L/U spaces taking into account the existing spaces 175

9.3.4. Evaluation of the existing L/U spaces in the area 176

9.4. Conclusion 177

9.5. Acknowledgements 178

9.6. Bibliography 178

Chapter 10. Understanding Road Freight Movements in Melbourne 181
Loshaka PERERA, Russell G. THOMPSON and Yiqun CHEN

10.1. Introduction 181

10.2. Data 183

10.2.1. Comprehensive freight data 183

10.2.2. Land-use data 184

10.2.3. Employment data 185

10.3. Analysis, results and discussion 185

10.3.1. General descriptive analysis 185

10.3.2. Test of independence 192

10.3.3. Regression analysis 194

10.3.4. Freight vehicle cost analysis 197

10.4. Conclusion 198

10.5. Future work 199

10.6. Bibliography 199

Chapter 11. High-Resolution Last-Mile Network Design 201
Daniel MERCHÁN and Matthias WINKENBACH

11.1. Introduction 201

11.2. Literature review 202

11.3. Network circuity in last-mile logistics 203

11.3.1. Circuity factors 203

11.3.2. Empirical analysis for São Paulo 204

11.4. Model for two-echelon network design 206

11.5. Case study 209

11.6. Conclusion 212

11.7. Bibliography 212

Chapter 12. Cooperative Models for Addressing Urban Freight Challenges: The NOVELOG and U-TURN Approaches 215
Maria RODRIGUES, Eleni ZAMPOU, Vasilis ZEIMPEKIS, Alexander STATHACOPOULOS, Tharsis TEOH and Georgia AYFANTOPOULOU

12.1. Introduction 215

12.2. Business models in the UFT environment 217

12.3. Need for cooperative business models in the evolving UFT environment 219

12.3.1. The approach of NOVELOG 219

12.3.2. The case of Turin 221

12.3.3. The approach of U-TURN 224

12.4. Conclusions 232

12.5. Bibliography 233

Chapter 13. The Capacity of Indonesian Logistics Service Providers in Information and Communication Technology Adoption 235
Kuncoro Harto WIDODO, Joewono SOEMARDJITO and Yandra Rahardian PERDANA

13.1. Introduction 235

13.2. Literature review 237

13.2.1. ICT as an essential logistics performance 237

13.2.2. The role of ICT in city logistics 238

13.2.3. ICT platforms and innovation in logistics 240

13.2.4. Impact of ICT adoption 241

13.3. Method 242

13.4. Results 243

13.5. Conclusion 246

13.6. Bibliography 246

Chapter 14. An Explorative Approach to Freight Trip Attraction in an Industrial Urban Area 249
Elise CASPERSEN

14.1. Introduction 249

14.2. Background 251

14.3. Data from establishments in Groruddalen 252

14.3.1. try classification 254

14.4. Estimating freight trip generation models 256

14.4.1. FTA model functional form 257

14.4.2. Model extension with establishment and shipment characteristics 261

14.5. Conclusion 264

14.6. Bibliography 266

Chapter 15. Choice of Using Distribution Centers in the Container Import Chain: a Hybrid Model Correcting for Missing Information 269
Elnaz IRANNEZHAD, Carlo G. PRATO And Mark HICKMAN

15.1. Introduction 270

15.2. Methods 271

15.2.1. Data 271

15.2.2. Model formulation 274

15.2.3. Model specification 276

15.3. Results 277

15.4. Conclusions 279

15.5. Acknowledgements 279

15.6. Bibliography 279

Chapter 16. Applying Gamification to Freight Surveys: Understanding Singapore Truck Drivers’ Preferences 281
Fangping LU And Lynette CHEAH

16.1. Introduction 281

16.2. Gamification process 283

16.2.1. What is gamification? 283

16.2.2. Gamification design methods 284

16.3. Protoypes and testing 287

16.4. Conclusion 293

16.5. Acknowledgements 295

16.6. Bibliography 296

Chapter 17. Urban Distribution of Craft-Brewed Beer in the Belo Horizonte Metropolitan Area 299
Renata Lúcia Magalhães DE OLIVEIRA, Patrick Mendes dos SANTOS, Jonathan REITH, Julia Almeida COSTA and Leise Kelli DE OLIVEIRA

17.1. Introduction 299

17.2. The urban distribution of beer 301

17.3. Study area: Belo Horizonte Metropolitan Area 303

17.4. Methodological approach 304

17.4.1. Data collection and spatialization 305

17.4.2. Descriptive analysis of the consumer profile 307

17.4.3. Logistics network design 307

17.5. Results and discussions 309

17.5.1. Descriptive analysis of the consumer profile 310

17.5.2. Logistics network design 311

17.6. Conclusion 313

17.7. Acknowledgements 314

17.8. Bibliography 314

Chapter 18. Issues and Challenges in Urban Logistics Planning in Indonesia 317
Kuncoro Harto WIDODO, Danang PARIKESIT, Hengki PURWOTO, Joewono SOEMARDJITO and ERIADI

18.1. Introduction 317

18.2. Identifying urban logistics challenges 318

18.2.1. Urban growth and urbanization 318

18.2.2. E-commerce growth 319

18.2.3. Space conflict 320

18.2.4. Traffic density congestion 321

18.2.5. Readiness for agents/operators 322

18.2.6. Readiness for logistics regulation 323

18.2.7. Environmental, geographical and disasters issues 323

18.3. Implementation of city logistics in Indonesia 325

18.4. Acknowledgements 326

18.5. Bibliography 326

Chapter 19. From City Logistics Theories to City Logistics Planning 329
Francesco RUSSO and Antonio COMI

19.1. Introduction 329

19.2. The state of the art 331

19.2.1. ds and models 331

19.2.2. City logistics plans 333

19.2.3. Goals 334

19.3. The interconnected processes to study and to implement city logistics 335

19.4. The city logistics plan definition 336

19.4.1. Empirical data driving city logistics theories and the plan design 337

19.4.2. City logistics measures 337

19.4.3. Grant for start-up 341

19.5. Conclusions 343

19.6. Bibliography 343

Chapter 20. Strategies to Improve Urban Freight Logistics in Historical Centers: the Cases of Lisbon and Mexico City 349
Juan Pablo ANTÚN, Vasco REIS and Rosário MACÁRIO

20.1. Introduction 349

20.2. Objectives 351

20.3. Methodology 352

20.4. Trends in corporate logistics for urban goods distribution 352

20.5. Urban logistics in historical centers 353

20.5.1. Complexity of the physical distribution of goods in Historical Centers and Central Districts of cities 353

20.5.2. Priority areas of intervention for public policies to improve Urban Logistics in Historical Centers and Central Districts of cities 354

20.6. Parallelisms and contrasts in logistic practices in the Historical Centers of the city of Mexico and Lisbon 356

20.6.1. Trends in logistics practices 356

20.6.2. Logistics impact of pre-selling 357

20.6.3. Size and technology of urban freight vehicles 358

20.6.4. Logistics Platforms: DLP and OC 359

20.7. Experimental proposals for the Historical Center of Lisbon 360

20.7.1. Characteristics of the Historic Center of Lisbon 360

20.7.2. Period of operation of deliveries to the HORECA sector 361

20.7.3. Experimental proposals to improve the logistics of distribution of goods, with particular reference to the HORECA sector, at the Historic Districts of Lisbon 361

20.8. Conclusions 365

20.9. Bibliography 365

List of Authors 367

Index 371