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Communicable Disease Control Handbook, 2nd Edition

Communicable Disease Control Handbook, 2nd Edition

Jeremy Hawker, Norman Begg, Iain Blair, Ralf Reintjes, Julius Weinberg

ISBN: 978-0-470-75512-9 January 2008 Wiley-Blackwell 424 Pages

Description

Concise and practical handbook for all those who have responsibility for the identification and control of infectious disease


Why Buy this Book?:


  • Clear and concise - combining science, attention to detail and a practical approach
  • Covers basic principles of communicable disease control and health protection, major syndromes, control of individual infections, main services and activities, organizational arragements for all EU countries and sources of further information
  • All chapters updated inline with recent changes in epidemiology, new guidelines for control and adminstrative changes
  • New or expanded chapters on immunization queries, smallpox, SARS, West Nile virus, delibrate release / bioterrorism and on-call response


"This comprehensive and practical handbook will provide a very accessible source of detailed information for everyone in the field of communicable disease control."
Sir Liam Donaldson, Chief Medical Officer (from the foreword)


"This handbook will be a valuable resource for all those who are interested in control of communicable disease, including public-health physicians, epidemiologists, infection control nurses, microbiologists and those training to work in these related fields."
The Lancet Infectious Diseases


"This book fulfils all the needs of a practical handbook, being easy to use and packed with practical information."
Epidemiology and Infection


"This would be the first book to reach for in any number of day-to-day or crisis situations in communicable disease control."
British Journal of Infection Control


"If you undertake on-call public health duties, just buy the book."
Journal of Public Health Medicine

Section 1: Introduction.

1.1 How to use this book.

1.2 Basic concepts in epidemiology and control of infection.

1.3 Health Protection on-call.

Section 2: Common Topics.

2.1 Meningitis and meningism.

2.2 Gastrointestinal infection.

2.3 Community acquired pneumonia.

2.4 Rash in pregnancy.

2.5 Rash and fever in children.

2.6 Illness in returning travellers.

2.7 Sexually transmitted infections.

2.8 Jaundice.

2.9 Infection in the immunocompromised.

2.10 Blood-borne viral infection.

2.11 Vaccine queries.

Section 3: Diseases.

3.1 Amoebic dysentery.

3.2 Anthrax.

3.3 Bacillus cereus.

3.4 Botulism.

3.5 Brucellosis.

3.6 Campylobacter.

3.7 Chickenpox and shingles (varicella-zoster infections).

3.8 Chlamydia pneumoniae.

3.9 Chlamydia psittaci.

3.10 Chlamydia trachomatis (genital).

3.11 Cholera.

3.12 CJD and other Human Transmissable Spongiform Encephalopathies.

3.13 Clostridium difficile.

3.14 Clostridium perfringens.

3.15 Coxsackievirus infections.

3.16 Cryptosporidiosis.

3.17 Cyclosporiasis.

3.18 Cytomegalovirus.

3.19 Dengue fever.

3.20 Diphtheria.

3.21 Encephalitis, acute.

3.22 Enterococci, including Glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE).

3.23 Epstein-Barr virus.

3.24 Escherischia coli O157 (and other E. coli gastroenteritis).

3.25 Giardiasis.

3.26 Gonorrhoea, syphilis and other acute STIs.

3.27 Hantavirus.

3.28 Headlice.

3.29 Helicobacter pylori.

3.30 Hepatitis A.

3.31 Hepatitis B.

3.32 Hepatitis C.

3.33 Delta Hepatitis.

3.34 Hepatitis E.

3.35 Herpes simplex.

3.36 Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection.

3.37 HIV.

3.38 Influenza.

3.39 Japanese B encephalitis.

3.40 Kawasaki Syndrome.

3.41 Legionellosis.

3.42 Leprosy.

3.43 Leptospirosis.

3.44 Listeria.

3.45 Lyme disease.

3.46 Malaria.

3.47 Measles.

3.48 Meningococcal infection.

3.49 Molluscum contagiosum.

3.50 MRSA (methicillin-restisant Staphylococcus aureus).

3.51 Mumps.

3.52 Mycoplasma.

3.53 Norovius.

3.54 Ophthalmia neonatorum.

3.55 Paratyphoid fever.

3.56 Parvovirus B19 (fifth disease).

3.57 Plague.

3.58 Pneumococcal infection.

3.59 Poliomyelitis.

3.60 Q fever.

3.61 Rabies.

3.62 Relapsing fever.

3.63 Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

3.64 Ringworm.

3.65 Rotavirus.

3.66 Rubella.

3.67 Salmonellosis.

3.68 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

3.69 Scabies.

3.70 Shigella .

3.71 Smallpox.

3.72 Staphylococcal food poisoning.

3.73 Streptococcal infections.

3.74 Tetanus.

3.75 Threadworms.

3.76 Tick-borne encephalitis.

3.77 Toxocara.

3.78 Toxoplasmosis.

3.79 Tuberculosis.

3.80Tularaemia.

3.81 Typhoid fever.

3.82 Typhus, other rickettsial infections and Ehrlichiosis.

3.83 Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

3.84 Viral haemorrhagic fevers.

3.85 Warts & verrucae.

3.86 West Nile virus.

3.87 Whooping cough(pertussis).

3.88 Yellow fever.

3.89 Yersiniosis.

3.90 Other organisms.

1. Helminths.

2. Protozoa.

3. Fungi.

4. Viruses.

5. Bites, stings and venoms.

6. Chemical food-borne illness.

Section 4: Services and Organisations.

4.1 Administrative arrangements for communicable disease control.

4.2 Surveillance of communicable disease.

4.3 Managing infectious disease incidents and outbreaks.

4.4 Community infection control.

4.5 Healthcare associated infection.

4.6 Risks to & from healthcare workers.

4.7 Co-ordination of immunisation services.

4.8 Co-ordination of services for HIV infection in the UK.

4.9 Co-ordination of services for tuberculosis control.

4.10 Travel Health and Illness in returning travellers.

4.11 Surveillance & investigation of environmental hazards.

4.12 Managing acute chemical incidents.

4.13 Managing acute radiation incidents.

4.14 Planning for deliberate release of biological, chemical or radiological agents.

4.15 Port health.

4.16 Media relations.

4.17 Clinical governance and audit.

Section 5: Communicable Disease Control in Europe.

5.1 International collaboration in Europe.

5.2 Austria.

5.3 Belgium.

5.4 Cyprus.

5.5 Czech Republic.

5.6 Denmark.

5.7 Estonia.

5.8 France.

5.9 Finland.

5.10 Germany.

5.11 Greece.

5.12 Hungary.

5.13 Republic of Ireland.

5.14 Italy.

5.15 Latvia.

5.16 Lithuania.

5.17 Luxemburg.

5.18 Malta.

5.19 Netherlands.

5.20 Norway.

5.21 Poland.

5.22 Portugal.

5.23 Slovakia.

5.24 Slovenia.

5.25 Spain.

5.26 Sweden.

5.27 Switzerland.

5.28 United Kingdom.

Appendix 1: Useful addresses telephone numbers.

Appendix 2: Guidance documents and books

"This handbook is of special interest to hospital infection control officers and clinical microbiologists...I regard this book as an excellent resource for physicians, public health workers, hospital infection control personnel, and clinical microbiologists." (ASM News)

"A well organized and supremely practical book to have at hand when on-call for public health or indeed microbiology and infectious diseases"
Journal of Hospital Infection

"A very pragmatic, well organized handbook that has been well thought out. It should be read thoroughly and kept on the bedside table to consult as necessary."
Journal of Hospital Infection

"Each section of the book is clearly written, and laid out so that key information is readily apparent to the reader in a hurry. An excellent text, of use to infection control nurses in acute and community settings, as well as health protection staff."
British Journal of Infection Control

"This comprehensive and practical handbook will provide a very accessible source of detailed information for everyone in the field of communicable disease control."
Sir Liam Donaldson, Chief Medical Officer (from the foreword)


ON THE PREVIOUS EDITION

"This handbook will be a valuable resource for all those who are interested in control of communicable disease, including public-health physicians, epidemiologists, infection control nurses, microbiologists and those training to work in these related fields."
The Lancet Infectious Diseases


"This book fulfils all the needs of a practical handbook, being easy to use and packed with practical information."
Epidemiology and Infection


"This would be the first book to reach for in any number of day-to-day or crisis situations in communicable disease control."
British Journal of Infection Control


"If you undertake on-call public health duties, just buy the book."
Journal of Public Health Medicine


From the forward (of the first edition) by Sir Donald Acheson:

"...(this book) seems to me to incorporate all that is best in the tradition of (the CDSC) - sound science, attention to detail and an essentially practical approach."

"This outstanding and I suspect unique handbook is packed with useful information. I believe it will prove to be an essential resource for those, not only within the United Kingdom but throughout Europe, who have responsibility for the identification and control of infectious disease. It will also be an indispensable text for students aspiring to a career in this important field."