Skip to main content

Communication Systems Principles Using MATLAB

Communication Systems Principles Using MATLAB

John W. Leis

ISBN: 978-1-119-47067-0

Oct 2018

576 pages

In Stock

$135.00

Description

Discover the basic telecommunications systems principles in an accessible learn-by-doing format

Communication Systems Principles Using MATLAB covers a variety of systems principles in telecommunications in an accessible format without the need to master a large body of theory. The text puts the focus on topics such as radio and wireless modulation, reception and transmission, wired networks and fiber optic communications. The book also explores packet networks and TCP/IP as well as digital source and channel coding, and the fundamentals of data encryption.

Since MATLAB® is widely used by telecommunications engineers, it was chosen as the vehicle to demonstrate many of the basic ideas, with code examples presented in every chapter. The text addresses digital communications with coverage of packet-switched networks. Many fundamental concepts such as routing via shortest-path are introduced with simple and concrete examples. The treatment of advanced telecommunications topics extends to OFDM for wireless modulation, and public-key exchange algorithms for data encryption. Throughout the book, the author puts the emphasis on understanding rather than memorization. The text also:

  • Includes many useful take-home skills that can be honed while studying each aspect of telecommunications
  • Offers a coding and experimentation approach with many real-world examples provided
  • Gives information on the underlying theory in order to better understand conceptual developments
  • Suggests a valuable learn-by-doing approach to the topic

Written for students of telecommunications engineering, Communication Systems Principles Using MATLAB® is the hands-on resource for mastering the basic concepts of telecommunications in a learn-by-doing format.

Related Resources

Preface xiii

Acknowledgments xv

Introduction xvii

About the CompanionWebsite xxi

1 Signals and Systems 1

1.1 Chapter Objectives 1

1.2 Introduction 1

1.3 Signals and Phase Shift 2

1.4 System Building Blocks 3

1.4.1 Basic Building Blocks 3

1.4.2 Phase Shifting Blocks 4

1.4.3 Linear and Nonlinear Blocks 5

1.4.4 Filtering Blocks 8

1.5 Integration and Differentiation of aWaveform 10

1.6 Generating Signals 16

1.7 Measuring and Transferring Power 19

1.7.1 Root Mean Square 19

1.7.2 The Decibel 23

1.7.3 Maximum Power Transfer 25

1.8 System Noise 29

1.9 Chapter Summary 32

Problems 32

2 Wired,Wireless, and Optical Systems 37

2.1 Chapter Objectives 37

2.2 Introduction 37

2.3 Useful Preliminaries 38

2.3.1 Frequency Components When a SignalWaveform Is Known 38

2.3.2 Frequency SpectrumWhen a Signal Is Measured 42

2.3.3 Measuring the Frequency Spectrum in Practice 44

2.4 Wired Communications 50

2.4.1 Cabling Considerations 50

2.4.2 Pulse Shaping 52

2.4.3 Line Codes and Synchronization 62

2.4.4 Scrambling and Synchronization 66

2.4.5 Pulse Reflection 73

2.4.6 Characteristic Impedance of a Transmission Line 80

2.4.7 Wave Equation for a Transmission Line 83

2.4.8 StandingWaves 84

2.5 Radio andWireless 92

2.5.1 Radio-frequency Spectrum 92

2.5.2 Radio Propagation 92

2.5.3 Line-of-sight Considerations 96

2.5.4 Radio Reflection 97

2.5.5 RadioWave Diffraction 99

2.5.6 RadioWaves with a Moving Sender or Receiver 103

2.5.7 Sending and Capturing a Radio Signal 105

2.5.8 Processing aWireless Signal 119

2.5.9 Intermodulation 128

2.5.10 External Noise 131

2.6 Optical Transmission 132

2.6.1 Principles of Optical Transmission 132

2.6.2 Optical Sources 134

2.6.3 Optical Fiber 139

2.6.4 Optical Fiber Losses 145

2.6.5 Optical Transmission Measurements 147

2.7 Chapter Summary 150

Problems 151

3 Modulation and Demodulation 155

3.1 Chapter Objectives 155

3.2 Introduction 155

3.3 Useful Preliminaries 156

3.3.1 Trigonometry 157

3.3.2 Complex Numbers 159

3.4 The Need for Modulation 162

3.5 Amplitude Modulation 164

3.5.1 Frequency Components 167

3.5.2 Power Analysis 170

3.5.3 AM Demodulation 171

3.5.4 Variations on AM 173

3.6 Frequency and Phase Modulation 180

3.6.1 FM and PM Concepts 181

3.6.2 FM and PM Analysis 183

3.6.3 Generation of FM and PM Signals 185

3.6.4 The Spectrum of Frequency Modulation 186

3.6.5 Why Do the Bessel Coefficients Give the Spectrum of FM? 195

3.6.6 FM Demodulation 200

3.7 Phase Tracking and Synchronization 204

3.8 Demodulation Using IQ Methods 215

3.8.1 Demodulation of AM Using IQ Signals 216

3.8.2 Demodulation of PM Using IQ Signals 219

3.8.3 Demodulation of FM Using IQ Signals 222

3.9 Modulation for Digital Transmission 225

3.9.1 Digital Modulation 226

3.9.2 Recovering Digital Signals 228

3.9.3 Orthogonal Signals 237

3.9.4 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation 239

3.9.5 Frequency Division Multiplexing 242

3.9.6 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing 244

3.9.7 Implementing OFDM: The FFT 247

3.9.8 Spread Spectrum 254

3.10 Chapter Summary 261

Problems 261

4 Internet Protocols and Packet Delivery Algorithms 269

4.1 Chapter Objectives 269

4.2 Introduction 269

4.3 Useful Preliminaries 270

4.3.1 Packet Switching 270

4.3.2 Binary Operations 272

4.3.3 Data Structures and Dereferencing Data 272

4.4 Packets, Protocol Layers, and the Protocol Stack 277

4.5 Local Area Networks 281

4.5.1 Wired LANs 282

4.5.2 Wireless LANs 284

4.6 Device Packet Delivery: Internet Protocol 286

4.6.1 The Original IPv4 286

4.6.2 Extension to IPv6 286

4.6.3 IP Checksum 290

4.6.4 IP Addressing 294

4.6.5 Subnetworks 296

4.6.6 Network Address Translation 298

4.7 Network Access Configuration 300

4.7.1 Mapping MAC to IP: ARP 301

4.7.2 IP Configuration: DHCP 302

4.7.3 Domain Name System (DNS) 302

4.8 Application Packet Delivery: TCP and UDP 303

4.9 TCP: Reliable Delivery and Network Fairness 309

4.9.1 Connection Establishment and Teardown 311

4.9.2 Congestion Control 311

4.9.3 TCP Timeouts 319

4.10 Packet Routing 321

4.10.1 Routing Example 322

4.10.2 Mechanics of Packet Forwarding 323

4.10.3 Routing Tasks 325

4.10.4 Forwarding Table Using Supernetting 326

4.10.5 Route Path Lookup 330

4.10.6 Routing Tables Based on Neighbor Discovery: Distance Vector 343

4.10.7 Routing Tables Based on Network Topology: Link State 348

4.11 Chapter Summary 359

Problems 359

5 Quantization and Coding 363

5.1 Chapter Objectives 363

5.2 Introduction 363

5.3 Useful Preliminaries 364

5.3.1 Probability Functions 364

5.3.2 Difference Equations and the z Transform 366

5.4 Digital Channel Capacity 369

5.5 Quantization 372

5.5.1 Scalar Quantization 373

5.5.2 Companding 379

5.5.3 Unequal Step Size Quantization 382

5.5.4 Adaptive Scalar Quantization 383

5.5.5 Vector Quantization 385

5.6 Source Coding 389

5.6.1 Lossless Codes 390

5.6.1.1 Entropy and Codewords 390

5.6.1.2 The Huffman Code 392

5.6.1.3 Adapting the Probability Table 404

5.6.2 Block-based Lossless Encoders 405

5.6.2.1 Sliding-Window Lossless Encoders 405

5.6.2.2 Dictionary-based Lossless Encoders 407

5.6.3 Differential PCM 409

5.6.3.1 Sample-by-sample Prediction 410

5.6.3.2 Adaptive Prediction 417

5.7 Image Coding 420

5.7.1 Block Truncation Algorithm 422

5.7.2 Discrete Cosine Transform 425

5.7.3 Quadtree Decomposition 430

5.7.4 Color Representation 431

5.8 Speech and Audio Coding 433

5.8.1 Linear Prediction for Speech Coding 434

5.8.2 Analysis by Synthesis 439

5.8.3 Spectral Response and NoiseWeighting 440

5.8.4 Audio Coding 442

5.9 Chapter Summary 447

Problems 447

6 Data Transmission and Integrity 453

6.1 Chapter Objectives 453

6.2 Introduction 453

6.3 Useful Preliminaries 454

6.3.1 Probability Error Functions 454

6.3.2 Integer Arithmetic 458

6.4 Bit Errors in Digital Systems 461

6.4.1 Basic Concepts 461

6.4.2 Analyzing Bit Errors 463

6.5 Approaches to Block Error Detection 470

6.5.1 Hamming Codes 472

6.5.2 Checksums 478

6.5.3 Cyclic Redundancy Checks 482

6.5.4 Convolutional Coding for Error Correction 489

6.6 Encryption and Security 507

6.6.1 Cipher Algorithms 508

6.6.2 Simple Encipherment Systems 509

6.6.3 Key Exchange 512

6.6.4 Digital Signatures and Hash Functions 519

6.6.5 Public-key Encryption 520

6.6.6 Public-key Authentication 522

6.6.7 Mathematics Underpinning Public-key Encryption 522

6.7 Chapter Summary 526

Problems 526

References 531

Index 541