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Consequences of the Internet for Self and Society: Is Social Life Being Transformed?

Consequences of the Internet for Self and Society: Is Social Life Being Transformed?

Katelyn Y. A. McKenna (Editor), John A. Bargh (Editor), Irene Hanson Frieze (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-10078-6

Mar 2002, Wiley-Blackwell

216 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$47.95

Description

The Internet is becoming a primary means of interpersonal communication, and with this comes implications for many aspects of social life. This book examines these from a variety of perspectives: psychological well-being, interpersonal relationships, social identity, group conflict, negotiation and bargaining, community involvement, and the development of democratic institutions. The authors present quantitative as well as qualitative methodological approaches, along with analyses reflecting the complexities of the 'Human-Internet interaction'.

  • Examines the implications of the internet as the primary means of personal communication
  • Pulls together current research by well established researchers on the social consequences of the Internet, from a variety of levels of analysis, producing a holographic, 3-D look at the Internet's impact on psychological functioning of the individual as well as on the social fabric
  • Perspectives of this examination include: psychological well-being, interpersonal relationships, social identity, group conflict, negotiation and bargaining,
    community involvement, and the development of democratic institutions
Part I: Introduction:.

1. Introduction to the issue: John A. Bargh, Department of Psychology, New York University.

Part II: The Internet and the Individual:.

2.Relationship Formation on the Internet: What's the Big Attraction?: Katelyn Y. A. McKenna, Amie S. Green, & Marci E. J. Gleason, Department of Psychology, New York University.

3. Can You See the Real Me? Activation and Expression of the ‘True self' on the Internet: John A. Bargh, Katelyn Y. A. McKenna, & Grainne M. Fitzsimons, Department of Psychology, New York University.

4. Internet Paradox Revisited: Robert Kraut, Sara Kiesler, Bonka Boneva, Jonathon Cummings, Vicki Helgeson, & Anne Crawford, Department of Human-Computer.Interaction, Carnegie-Mellon University.

5. Internet Use and Well-Being in Adolescence: Elisheva F. Gross, Jaana Juvonen, & Shelly L. Gable, Department of Psychology, University of California – Los Angeles.

Part III: The Internet and the Organization:.

6.When are Net Effects Gross Products? The Power of Influence and the Influence of Power in Computer-Mediated Communication: Russell Spears & Tom Postmes, Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam; Martin Lea, Department of Psychology, Manchester University; Anka Wolbert, Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam.

7. Negotiating via Information Technology: Theory and Application: Leigh Thompson, Kellogg Graduate School of Business, Northwestern University, Janice Nadler, Northwestern University and American Bar Foundation.

Part IV: The Internet and Government:.

8.Civic Culture Meets the Digital Divide: The Role of Community: Electronic Networks: Eugene Borgida, John L. Sullivan, Alina Oxendine, Melinda S. Jackson, Eric Riedel, & Amy Gangl, Departments of Law and Psychology, University of Minnesota.

9. Dark Guests and Great Firewalls: The Internet and Chinese Security Policy: Ronald J. Deibert, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.

Part V: Methodological Techniques and Issues:.

10.eResearch: Ethics, Security, Design, and Control in Psychological Research on the Internet: Brian Nosek & Mahzarin R. Banaji, Department of Psychology, Yale University, Anthony G. Greenwald, Department of Psychology, University of Washington.

11. Studying Hate Crime with the Internet: What Makes Racists Advocate Racial Violence? Jack Glaser & Jay Dixit, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California – Berkeley; Donald Green, Department of Political Science, Yale University.

Part VI: Concluding Perspective:.

12.Is the Internet Changing Social Life? It Seems the More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same: Tom R. Tyler: Department of Psychology, New York University.


  • Examines the implications of the internet as the primary means of personal communication.

  • Pulls together current research by well established researchers on the social consequences of the Internet, from a variety of levels of analysis, producing a holographic, 3-D look at the Internet's impact on psychological functioning of the individual as well as on the social fabric.

  • Perspectives of this examination include: psychological well-being, interpersonal relationships, social identity, group conflict, negotiation and bargaining,
    community involvement, and the development of democratic institutions.

  • Authors present quantitative as well as qualitative methodological
    approaches.