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Construction Innovation and Process Improvement

Construction Innovation and Process Improvement

Akintola Akintoye (Editor), Jack Goulding (Editor), Girma Zawdie (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-118-28031-7

Mar 2012, Wiley-Blackwell

456 pages

$102.99

Description

Innovation in construction is essential for growth. The industry strives to remain competitive using a variety of approaches and needs to engage structured initiatives linked to proven innovation concepts, techniques and applications. Even in mature markets like the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) sector, where business behaviour is generally considered as being risk averse, it is increasingly important to embed innovation into mainstream business practices.

In Construction Innovation and Process Improvement a number of wide ranging issues from construction practice in different countries with different contexts are presented to provide a rich collection of literature embracing theory and practice.

Chapters are divided into three broad themes of construction innovation relating to: Theory and Practice; Process Drivers; and Future Technologies. Several questions are posed, including for example: What is particularly unique about construction innovation in theory and practice? What are the major drivers of construction innovation? What factors are needed to support and deliver future construction technologies?

In attempting to respond to such questions, the book sheds new light on these challenges, and provides readers with a number of ways forward, especially cognisant of the increased role of globalisation, the enhanced impact of knowledge, and importance of innovation. All these can have a significant impact on strategic decision-making, competitive advantage, and sustainable policies and practices.

Part One deals with change management, technology, sustainable construction, and supply chain management; Part Two addresses innovation and process improvement drivers, including strategic management, concurrent engineering, risk management, innovative procurement, knowledge management; Part Three explores future technologies in construction – and particularly, how these can be harnessed and leveraged to help procure innovation and process improvement.

Contributors xi

Part I Theory and Practice

Chapter 1. Construction Innovation and Process Improvement
Akintola Akintoye, Jack S. Goulding and Girma Zawdie

1.1 Introduction 3

1.2 Innovation in Construction 4

1.3 Construction Innovation: Theory and Practice 7

1.4 Construction Innovation: Process Drivers 10

1.5 Construction Innovation: Future Technologies 13

1.6 Conclusion 15

Chapter 2. Construction Innovation through Change Management
Girma Zawdie

2.1 Introduction 19

2.2 The Innovation Process: Evolution as a Systemic Phenomenon 21

2.3 Role of Culture as Challenge for Change Management and Innovation 27

2.4 General Framework for Change Management 32

2.5 Innovation in Construction 36

2.6 Conclusion 40

Chapter 3. Construction Innovation: Theory and Practice
Martin G. Sexton and Shu-Ling Lu

3.1 Introduction 45

3.2 Definitional Debate on Innovation 45

3.3 Market-based, Resource-based and Balanced Perspectives on Innovation 47

3.4 Case Study of Innovation in a Small Construction Professional Service Firm 50

3.5 Conclusion 59

Chapter 4. Culture and Innovation
Anita Liu and Richard Fellows

4.1 Introduction 63

4.2 Culture and Construction 64

4.3 Culture and Innovation 75

4.4 Factors Affecting Innovation 82

4.5 Conclusion 87

4.6 Acknowledgements 88

Chapter 5.  Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Transfer for Sustainable Construction
Emilia van Egmond

5.1 Introduction 95

5.2 Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Transfer Practices 97

5.3 Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Transfer in Construction 106

5.4 The Construction Innovation System 110

5.5 Technological Regime in Construction 112

5.6 Opportunities, Appropriation and Cumulative Effect of Innovation 113

5.7 Managing Innovation for Sustainable Construction: The Dutch Case 114

5.8 Conclusion 118

Chapter 6 Innovation and Value Delivery through Supply Chain Management
Derek H.T. Walker

6.1 Introduction 125

6.2 Organisational Value 126

6.3 Value Generation and SCM 131

6.4 Emerging Supply Chain Management Issues 135

6.5 Case Study of Supply Chain Management Triggering Total Business Transformation 140

6.6 Conclusion 147

6.7 Acknowledgements 148

Part II Process Drivers

Chapter 7. Strategic Management in Construction
Jack S. Goulding

7.1 Introduction 157

7.2 Construction Sector Dynamism and Drivers 158

7.3 Business Processes Redesign 159

7.4 Business Strategy 161

7.5 Business Performance Assessment 165

7.6 Strategy Development within Construction 169

7.7 Conclusion 175

Chapter 8. Risk Management in Planning for Process Improvement
Oluwaseyi Awodele, Stephen Ogunlana and Graeme Bowles

8.1 Introduction 181

8.2 Process Improvement 183

8.3 Planning for Process Improvement 191

8.4 Risk and its Management 193

8.5 Integrating Risk Management into Planning for Process Improvement 202

8.6 Conclusion 204

Chapter 9. Modern Methods of Construction
Wafaa Nadim

9.1 Introduction 209

9.2 The Need for Change 210

9.3 Modern Methods of Construction 212

9.4 Open Building Manufacturing – ManuBuild Project 217

9.5 Offsite Production in the UK Construction Industry 220

9.6 Conclusion 227

Chapter  10. Construction Innovation through Knowledge Management
Charles Egbu

10.1 Introduction 235

10.2 Knowledge and Knowledge Management – Context and Definition 236

10.3 Knowledge Management and Innovations in Project Based Environments 238

10.4 Managing Knowledge in Construction: Challenges Facing Project Based Organisations 239

10.5 Knowledge Management Strategy – Issues and Contexts 241

10.6 Knowledge Management Techniques and Technologies 242

10.7 Effective Knowledge Management Practices in Turbulent Economic and Market Conditions 245

10.8 Conclusion 247

Chapter 11. Innovation through Collaborative Procurement Strategy and Practices
Akintola Akintoye and Jamie Main

11.1 Introduction 251

11.2 Construction Procurement and the Procurement Cycle 252

11.3 Procurement Strategies 253

11.4 Conventional Procurement Methods 254

11.5 Collaborative Procurement or Innovation Procurement Methods 259

11.6 Conclusion 271

Chapter 12. Concurrent Engineering in Construction
Chimay J. Anumba and John M. Kamara

12.1 Introduction 277

12.2 The Concept of Concurrent Engineering 278

12.3 Implementation of CE 279

12.4 Benefits of Concurrent Engineering 281

12.5 CE in Construction 281

12.6 Critical Enablers of CE Adoption in the Construction Industry 286

12.7 Overcoming Barriers to CE Adoption 289

12.8 Benefits of CE to the Construction Industry 290

12.9 Conclusion 291

12.10 Acknowledgement 292

Chapter 13. Complexity Theory: Implications for the Built Environment

Mark D. Sharp

13.1 Introduction 297

13.2 Complexity Overview 297

13.3 Complexity in the Built Environment 301

13.4 Complexity in Organisations 302

13.5 Toolkits 303

13.6 Complex Innovation in Organisations 308

13.7 Conclusion 314

Part III Future Technologies

Chapter 14 Design Innovation: Advanced Visualisation Futures

Farzad Pour Rahimian

14.1 Introduction 321

14.2 Design Innovation and Existing Visualisation Tools 323

14.3 Cognitive Approach to Design 327

14.4 Virtual Reality Interfaces within Conceptual Architectural Design 329

14.5 Technical Implications for Developing Tangible Virtual Reality Design Interfaces 338

14.6 Conclusion 339

Chapter 15. Virtual Planning and Knowledge-based Decision Support
Joseph H.M. Tah

15.1 Introduction 347

15.2 The Complex Nature of Construction Projects 348

15.3 Construction Planning and Virtual Prototyping 349

15.4 Building Information Modelling 351

15.5 Interoperability and Industry Foundation Classes 353

15.6 Knowledge-based Decision Support for Virtual Prototyping 354

15.7 The Promotion of Innovation through Virtual Planning in Practice 357

15.8 Conclusion 359

Chapter 16. E-readiness in Construction
Eric Lou, Mustafa Alshawi and Jack S. Goulding

16.1 Challenges Facing the Construction Industry 363

16.2 Business Dynamics and Technology 365

16.3 Building ICT Capability 365

16.4 Business Process and ICT 366

16.5 People and ICT 367

16.6 Business Process and Implementation 369

16.7 E-readiness 370

16.8 Organisational E-readiness in Construction 372

16.9 Conclusion 378

Chapter Building Information Modelling
Umit Isikdag, Jason Underwood and Murat Kuruoglu

17.1 Introduction 385

17.2 Background 387

17.3 A Case Study on the Implementation of BIM 391

17.4 Building Information Modelling in the UK 393

17.5 Innovation through BIM 399

17.6 Conclusion 403

Chapter 18. Industry Preparedness: Advanced Learning Paradigms for Exploitation
Jack S. Goulding and Farzad Pour Rahimian

18.1 Introduction 409

18.2 Learning and Training Developments and Opportunities 410

18.3 Virtual Reality Systems 413

18.4 Case Study 415

18.5 Conclusion 427

18.6 Acknowledgements 428

Index 435

“There is, however, enough information within the contents to provide students with a useful starting point for their research, essentially a good resource book.”  (Construction Management and Economics, 24 November 2012)


  • 1. covers all construction process themes in one book

  • 2. encourages a reflective approach through numerous exercises and tasks

  • 3. demonstrates how to put changes in practice in place
  • 4. examines construction process improvement based on best practices in other industries