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Control Of Mechatronic Systems: Model-Driven Design and Implementation Guidelines

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Control Of Mechatronic Systems: Model-Driven Design and Implementation Guidelines

Patrick O. J. Kaltjob

ISBN: 978-1-119-50580-8 January 2020 504 Pages

Hardcover
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$130.00
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Description

A practical methodology for designing integrated automation control for systems and processes

Implementing digital control within mechanical-electronic (mechatronic) systems is essential to respond to the growing demand for high-efficiency machines and processes. In practice, the most efficient digital control often integrates time-driven and event-driven characteristics within a single control scheme. However, most of the current engineering literature on the design of digital control systems presents discrete-time systems and discrete-event systems separately. Control Of Mechatronic Systems: Model-Driven Design And Implementation Guidelines unites the two systems, revisiting the concept of automated control by presenting a unique practical methodology for whole-system integration. With its innovative hybrid approach to the modeling, analysis, and design of control systems, this text provides material for mechatronic engineering and process automation courses, as well as for self-study across engineering disciplines. Real-life design problems and automation case studies help readers transfer theory to practice, whether they are building single machines or large-scale industrial systems. 

  • Presents a novel approach to the integration of discrete-time and discrete-event systems within mechatronic systems and industrial processes
  • Offers user-friendly self-study units, with worked examples and numerous real-world exercises in each chapter
  • Covers a range of engineering disciplines and applies to small- and large-scale systems, for broad appeal in research and practice
  • Provides a firm theoretical foundation allowing readers to comprehend the underlying technologies of mechatronic systems and processes 

Control Of Mechatronic Systems is an important text for advanced students and professionals of all levels engaged in a broad range of engineering disciplines.

CONTENTS

PREFACE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL OF MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS

1.1. Introduction

1.2. Description of mechatronic systems

1.3. Generic controlled mechatronic system and instrumentation components

1.4. Functions and examples of controlled mechatronic systems and processes

1.5. Controller design and integration steps and implementation strategies

1.6. Exercises and conceptual problems

1.7. Bibliography

CHAPTER 2 PHYSICS-BASED SYSTEM AND PROCESS: DYNAMICS MODELLING

2.1. Introduction

2.2. Generic dynamic modeling methodology

2.3. Transportation systems and processes

2.3.1. Sea gantry crane handling process

2.3.2. Vertical elevator system

2.3.3. Hybrid vehicle powertrain with parallel configuration

2.3.4. Driverless vehicle longitudinal dynamics

2.3.5. Automated segway transportation systems

2.4. Biomedical systems and processes

2.4.1. Infant incubator

2.4.2. Blood glucose insulin metabolism

2.5. Fluidic and thermal systems and processes

2.5.1. Mixing tank

2.5.2. Purified water distribution process

2.5.3. Conveyor cake oven

2.5.4. Poultry scalding and defeathering thermal process

2.6. Chemical processes

2.6.1. Crude oil distillation petrochemical process

2.6.2. Larger beer fermentation tank

2.7. Production systems and process

2.7.1. Single axis drilling system

2.7.2. Cement-based pouzzolona portico scratcher

2.7.3. Variable pitch wind turbine generator system

2.8. Problems:

2.9. Bibliography

CHAPTER 3 DISCRETE TIME MODELING AND CONVERSION METHODS

3.1. Introduction

3.2. Digital signal processing preliminaries

3.2.1. Digital signal characterization

3.2.2. Difference equation: discrete time signal characterization using approximation methods

3.2.3. Z-transform and inverse Z-transform: theorems and properties

3.2.4. Procedure for discrete time approximation of continuous process model

3.2.5. Conversion and reconstruction of continuous signal: sampling and hold device

3.2.5.1. Sampler and hold based process model

3.2.5.2. Construction methods of a continuous signal from data sequence

3.3. Signal conditioning

3.4. Signal conversion technology

3.4.1. Digital-to-analog conversion

3.4.2. Analog-to-digital conversion

3.5. Data logging and processing

3.5.1. Computer bus structure and applications

3.6. Computer interface and data sampling issues

3.6.1. Signal conversion time delays effects

3.6.2. Estimation of minimum sampling rate to be selected

3.7. Exercise and Problems

3.8. Bibliography

CHAPTER 4 DISCRETE TIME ANALYSIS METHODS

4.1. Introduction

4.2. Analysis tools of discrete time systems and processes

4.2.1. Discrete pole and zero location

4.2.2. Discrete frequency analysis tools: Fourier series (DFT) and transform (DTFT and FFT)

4.2.2.1. Discrete system frequency response

4.2.2.2. Sketching procedure for frequency response of discrete system

4.2.2.3. Properties of frequency response

4.3. Discrete time controller specifications

4.3.1. Time domain specifications

4.3.2. Frequency response specifications

4.4. Discrete time steady state error analysis

4.5. Stability test for discrete time systems

4.5.1. Bounded-input Bounded output (BIBO) stability definition

4.5.2. Zero-input stability definition

4.5.3. Bilinear transformation and Routh-Hurwitz criterion

4.5.4. Jury-Marden stability test

4.5.5. Frequency based stability analysis

4.6. Performance indices and system dynamical analysis

4.7. Exercises and Problems:

4.8. Bibliography

CHAPTER 5 CONTINUOUS DIGITAL CONTROLLER DESIGN

5.1. Introduction

5.2. Design of control algorithms for continuous systems and processes

5.2.1. Direct design controller algorithms

5.2.2. Discrete PID controller algorithms

5.2.3. PID controller gains design using frequency response technique

5.2.3.1. Design procedure for PID controller design

5.2.4. PID controller gains design using root locus technique

5.2.4.1. Design procedures

5.2.5. Feedforward control methods

5.2.5.1. Command input feedforward control algorithm

5.2.5.2. Disturbance feedforward control algorihtm

5.3. Modern control topologies

5.3.1. State feedback PID control algorithms

5.3.2. Model predictive control algorithms

5.3.3. Open-loop position control using stepping motors

5.4. Induction motor controller design

5.4.1. Scalar control (v/f control)

5.4.2. Vector control

5.4.2.1. Speed control of AC motors

5.4.2.2. Speed control methods of DC motor

5.5. Exercises and Problems:

5.6. Bibliography

CHAPTER 6 BOOLEAN-BASED MODELING AND LOGIC CONTROLLER DESIGN

6.1. Introduction

6.2. Generic Boolean based modeling methodology

6.2.1. System operation description and functional analysis

6.2.2. Combinatorial and sequential logic systems

6.2.2.1. Combinational modelling tools: Truth Table, SOP, POS, K-maps

6.2.2.2. Sequential modelling tools: sequence table, state diagram, switching theory

6.3. Production systems

6.3.1. Portico scratcher

6.3.2. Robot assisted surgery

6.4. Biomedical system

6.4.1. Laser surgery devices

6.5. Transportation system

6.5.1. Elevator motion system

6.5.2. Fruit picker arm

6.5.3. Driverless car

6.6. Logic controller circuit design

6.7. Synchronizing mechanism of logic control program execution

6.8. Fail safe design and interlocks, validation issues

6.9. Exercises and Problems

6.10. Bibliography

CHAPTER 7 HYBRID CONTROLLER DESIGN

7.1. Introduction

7.2. Requirements for monitoring and control of hybrid system

7.2.1. Requirements for hybrid control system design

7.2.2. Requirements for system operations monitoring

7.2.3. Process interlock design requirements

7.3. Design methodology for monitoring and control systems

7.4. Examples of hybrid control and case studies

7.4.1. Elevator motion system

7.4.2. Bottle washing process

7.4.3. Dryer cement process

7.5. Exercises

7.6. Bibliography

CHAPTER 8 MECHATRONICS INSTRUMENTATION: ACTUATORS AND SENSORS

8.1. Introduction

8.2. Actuators in mechatronics

8.3. Electromechanical actuating systems

8.3.1. Solenoids

8.3.2. Digital binary actuators

8.3.3. DC motors actuating devices

8.3.4. AC motors actuing devices

8.3.5. Stepping motor actuating devices

8.4. Electro-fluidic actuating systems

8.4.1. Tranmission mechanical variables

8.4.2. Electric pumps

8.4.3. Electric cylinders

8.4.4. Electro-valves

8.5. Electro-heating actuating systems

8.6. Sensors in mechatronics

8.6.1. Measurement instruments

8.6.1.1. Relative position or distance measurement

8.6.1.2. Angular position measurement: resolver and optical encoder

8.6.1.3. Velocity measurement

8.6.1.4. Acceleration measurement

8.6.1.5. Force measurement

8.6.1.6. Torque measurement

8.6.1.7. Flow measurement

8.6.1.8. Pressure measurement

8.6.1.9. Liquid level measurement

8.6.1.10. Radio frequency based level measurement

8.6.1.11. Smart and nano sensors

8.6.2. Detection instruments

8.6.2.1. Electromechanical limit switches

8.6.2.2. Photoelectric sensors

8.6.2.3. RFID-based tracking and detection

8.6.2.4. Binary devices: pressure switches and vacuum switches

8.6.3. Electric motor interface and accessories

8.7. Exercises and Problems

8.8. Bibliography

APPENDICES

9. APPENDIX A: STOCHASTIC MODELING

10. APPENDIX B: STEP RESPONSE MODELING

11. APPENDIX C: Z-TRANSFORM TABLES

12. APPENDIX D: BOOLEAN ALGEBRA, BUS DRIVERS AND LOGIC GATES

13. APPENDIX E: SOLID STATE DEVICES AND POWER ELECTRONICS