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Crowdsourcing: One Step Beyond

Crowdsourcing: One Step Beyond

Jean-Fabrice Lebraty, Katia Lobre-Lebraty

ISBN: 978-1-118-76072-7

Sep 2013

144 pages

$60.99

Description

Crowdsourcing is a relatively recent phenomenon that only appeared in 2006, but it continues to grow and diversify (crowdfunding, crowdcontrol, etc.). This book aims to review this concept and show how it leads to the creation of value and new business opportunities.
Chapter 1 is based on four examples: the online-banking sector, an informative television channel, the postal sector and the higher education sector. It shows that in the current context, for a company facing challenges, the crowd remains an untapped resource. The next chapter presents crowdsourcing as a new form of externalization and offers definitions of crowdsourcing. In Chapter 3, the authors attempt to explain how a company can create value by means of a crowdsourcing operation. To do this, authors use a model linking types of value, types of crowd, and the means by which these crowds are accessed.
Chapter 4 examines in detail various forms that crowdsourcing may take, by presenting and discussing ten types of crowdsourcing operation. In Chapter 5, the authors imagine and explore the ways in which the dark side of crowdsourcing might be manifested and Chapter 6 offers some insight into the future of crowdsourcing.

Contents

1. A Turbulent and Paradoxical Environment.
2. Crowdsourcing: A New Form of Externalization.
3. Crowdsourcing and Value Creation.
4. Forms of Crowdsourcing.
5. The Dangers of Crowdsourcing.
6. The Future of Crowdsourcing.

About the Authors

Jean-Fabrice Lebraty is Professor of management sciences at IAE (Business School) at Jean Moulin – Lyon 3 University in France and a member of the research laboratory Magellan EA3713. He specializes in the management of information and communication systems and his research notably concerns decision-making and the links between crowd and information technology.
Katia Lobre-Lebraty is Associate Professor of management sciences at IAE (Business School) at Jean Moulin – Lyon 3 University in France and a member of the research laboratory Magellan EA3713. She specializes in management control and strategic management and her research concerns both the modes of governance of organizations and Open Data

INTRODUCTION  ix

I.1. A typology of management situations  x

I.2. Crowdsourcing: a multifaceted concept  xii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS   xv

CHAPTER 1. A TURBULENT AND PARADOXICAL ENVIRONMENT  1

1.1. Economic financialization and its challenges   1

1.2. The mass diffusion of the Internet and its consequences 3

1.3. The paradoxical coexistence of scarcity and abundance around data 4

1.4. Unique simultaneity of crisis and immobilism 8

1.4.1. The online banking sector   9

1.4.2. The postal sector    10

1.4.3. The television sector   11

1.4.4. The training sector: French universities 12

1.4.5. The conclusion to be drawn from these cases: the crowd remains an underexploited resource   13

CHAPTER 2. CROWDSOURCING: A NEW FORM OF EXTERNALIZATION   15

2.1. The concept of externalization  17

2.2. The idea of relationships   18

2.3. The concept of a crowd  19

2.3.1. The connected crowd  21

2.3.2. Understanding the crowd   23

2.3.3. Crowds and experts 26

CHAPTER 3. CROWDSOURCING AND VALUE CREATION 29

3.1 Creation of value    30

3.2. What type of value?   34

3.3 What type of crowd?  35

3.4 Towards an adapted business model 40

CHAPTER 4. FORMS OF CROWDSOURCING 47

4.1. Crowdjobbing   49

4.1.1. What is it?   50

4.1.2. Why it works     51

4.1.3. Limitations  52

4.1.4. The future   53

4.2. Crowdwisdom   55

4.2.1. What is it?   56

4.2.2. Why it works     56

4.2.3. Limitations  57

4.2.4. The future   57

4.3. Crowdfunding   58

4.3.1. What is it?   58

4.3.2. An illustrative example     59

4.3.3. Why it works     61

4.3.4. Limitations  63

4.3.5. The future   64

4.4. Crowdsourcing and forecasting    65

4.4.1.What is it?   65

4.4.2. An illustrative example     66

4.4.3. Why it works     68

4.4.4. Limitations  68

4.4.5. The future   68

4.5. Crowdsourcing and innovation    69

4.5.1. What is it?   70

4.5.2. Why it works     72

4.5.3. Limitations  73

4.5.4. The future   75

4.6. Crowdsourcing and authenticity (C&A)  75

4.6.1. What is it?   76

4.6.2. Why it works     77

4.6.3. Limitations  78

4.6.4. The future   79

4.7. Crowdauditing   80

4.7.1. What is it?   81

4.7.2. Why it works     82

4.7.3. Limitations  83

4.7.4. The future   84

4.8. Crowdcontrol 85

4.8.1. What is it?   85

4.8.2. Why it works     86

4.8.3. Limitations  86

4.8.4. The future   87

4.9. Crowdcuration   88

4.9.1. What is it?   88

4.9.2. An illustrative example     89

4.9.3. Why it works     90

4.9.4. Limitations  91

4.9.5. The future   92

4.10. Crowdcare   93

4.10.1. What is it?    93

4.10.2. An illustrative example    94

4.10.3. Why it works    96

4.10.4. Limitations    96

4.10.5. The future  96

CHAPTER 5. THE DANGERS OF CROWDSOURCING  97

CHAPTER 6. THE FUTURE OF CROWDSOURCING    101

CONCLUSION 107

BIBLIOGRAPHY  109

INDEX     119