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Cyberwar and Information Warfare

Cyberwar and Information Warfare

Daniel Ventre (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-848-21304-3

Aug 2011, Wiley-ISTE

448 pages

In Stock

$165.00

Description

Integrating empirical, conceptual, and theoretical approaches, this book presents the thinking of researchers and experts in the fields of cybersecurity, cyberdefense, and information warfare.
The aim of this book is to analyze the processes of information warfare and cyberwarfare through the historical, operational and strategic perspectives of cyberattacks.
Cyberwar and Information Warfare is of extreme use to experts in security studies and intelligence studies, defense universities, ministries of defense and security, and anyone studying political sciences, international relations, geopolitics, information technologies, etc.

Introduction ix
Daniel VENTRE

List of Acronyms xvii

Chapter 1. Cyberwar and its Borders 1
François-Bernard HUYGHE

1.1. The seduction of cyberwar 2

1.2. Desirable, vulnerable and frightening information 4

1.3. Conflict and its dimensions 6

1.4. The Helm and space 8

1.5. Between knowledge and violence 11

1.6. Space, distance and paths 13

1.7. The permanency of war 16

1.8. No war without borders 22

1.9. The enemy and the sovereign 25

1.10. Strengths and weaknesses 27

1.11. Bibliography 29

Chapter 2. War of Meaning, Cyberwar and Democracies 31
François CHAUVANCY

2.1. Introduction 31

2.2. Informational environment, a new operating space for strategy 34

2.3. Influence strategy: defeating and limiting armed force physical involvement 59

2.4. Conclusion 78

2.5. Bibliography 79

Chapter 3. Intelligence, the First Defense? Information Warfare and Strategic Surprise 83
Joseph HENROTIN

3.1. Information warfare, information and war 85

3.2. Intelligence and strategic surprise 90

3.3. Strategic surprise and information warfare 98

3.4. Concluding remarks: surprise in strategic studies 106

3.5. Bibliography 109

Chapter 4. Cyberconflict: Stakes of Power 113
Daniel VENTRE

4.1. Stakes of power 113

4.2. The Stuxnet affair 230

4.3. Bibliography 240

Chapter 5. Operational Aspects of a Cyberattack: Intelligence, Planning and Conduct 245
Eric FILIOL

5.1. Introduction 245

5.2. Towards a broader concept of cyberwar 247

5.3. Concept of critical infrastructure 253

5.4. Different phases of a cyberattack 260

5.5. A few “elementary building blocks” 268

5.6. Example scenario 273

5.7. Conclusion 281

5.8. Bibliography 282

Chapter 6. Riots in Xinjiang and Chinese Information Warfare 285
Daniel VENTRE

6.1. Xinjiang region: an explosive context 287

6.2. Riots, July 2009 291

6.3. Impacts on Chinese cyberspace: hacktivism and site defacing 303

6.4. Managing the “cyberspace” risk by the Chinese authorities 339

6.5. Chinese information warfare through the Xinjiang crisis 354

6.6. Conclusion 361

6.7. Bibliography 364

Chapter 7. Special Territories 367
Daniel VENTRE

7.1. Hong Kong: intermediate zone 367

7.2. North Korea: unknown figure of asymmetrical threat 379

7.3. Bibliography 393

Conclusion 395
Daniel VENTRE

List of Authors 401

Index 403