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Eclipse of Grace: Divine and Human Action in Hegel

Eclipse of Grace: Divine and Human Action in Hegel

Nicholas Adams

ISBN: 978-1-118-46587-5

Feb 2013, Wiley-Blackwell

264 pages

$88.99

Description

Eclipse of Grace offers original insights into the roots of modern theology by introducing systematic theologians and Christian ethicists to Hegel through a focus on three of his seminal texts: Phenomenology of Spirit, Science of Logic, and Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion.

  • Presents brilliant and original insights into Hegel’s significance for modern theology
  • Argues that, theologically, Hegel has been misconstrued and that much more can be gained by focusing on the logic that he develops out of an engagement with Christian doctrines
  • Features an original structure organized as a set of commentaries on individual Hegel texts, and not just presenting overviews of his entire corpus
  • Offers detailed engagement with Hegel’s texts rather than relying on generalizations about Hegelian philosophy
  • Provides an illuminating, accessible and lucid account of the thinking of the major figures in modern German philosophy and theology

 

Acknowledgments ix

Preface xi

1 Introduction 1

2 Absolute Knowing 17

3 The Absolute Idea 117

4 God Existing as Community 166

5 Eclipse of Grace 220

Bibliography 228

Index 235

“This is a really welcome book—original, careful, admirably clear and patient in exposition, fully engaged with contemporary debates, yet not simply reacting to the scholarship of others. This is a really welcome book—original, careful, admirably clear and patient in exposition, fully engaged with contemporary debates, yet not simply reacting to the scholarship of others . . . Both iconoclastic and profoundly constructive, it has the capacity to change quite radically—and for the better—the way theologians approach the Hegelian corpus.""  (Modern Theology, 16 September 2014)

“Nicholas Adams has produced a ground-breaking book that charts a clear course through the philosophical morass of Hegel’s main works and discovers in Hegel’s system of logic – more so than in his explicitly “theological” writings – much that is of value for contemporary theology. While recognising that some of Hegel’s writings are formidably difficult, especially for those without prior acquaintance with Spinoza, Kant or Fichte, Adams offers a helpful guide for surmounting these obstacles and makes a compelling case about why Hegel merits the serious scholarly attention of theologians.”  (European Journal of Theology, 1 October 2013)

“Summing Up: Recommended.  Graduate students and researchers/faculty.”  (Choice, 1 January 2014)