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Education and Learning: An Evidence-based Approach

Education and Learning: An Evidence-based Approach

Jane Mellanby, Katy Theobald

ISBN: 978-1-118-72808-6

Mar 2014

440 pages

$36.99

Description

Education and Learning offers an accessible introduction to the most recent evidence-based research into teaching, learning, and our education system.
  • Presents a wide range references for both seminal and contemporary research into learning and teaching
  • Examines the evidence around topical issues such as the impact of Academies and Free Schools on student attainment and the strong international performance of other countries
  • Looks at evidence-based differences in the attainment of students from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, and explores the strong international performance of Finnish and East Asian students
  • Provides accessible explanations of key studies that are supplemented with real-life case examples

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Acknowledgements ix

Preface xi

1 Introduction: What Can We Learn from the History of Education? 1

2 Memory: How Do We Remember What We Learn? 18

3 Language: What Determines Our Acquisition of First and Second Languages? 50

4 Reading: How Do We Learn to Read and Why Is It Sometimes so Difficult? 81

5 Intelligence and Ability: How Does Our Understanding of These Affect How We Teach? 109

6 Sex Differences: Do They Matter in Education? 142

7 Metacognition: Can We Teach People How to Learn? 173

8 Academic Selection: Do We Need to Do It and Can We Make It Fair? 207

9 Creativity: What Is It, and How and Why Should We Nurture It? 239

10 Education Policy: How Evidence Based Is It? 276

11 Comparative Education: What Lessons Can We Learn from Other Countries? 309

12 Life-long Learning: How Can We Teach Old Dogs New Tricks? 348

13 Technology: How Is It Shaping a Modern Education and Is It Also Shaping Young Minds? 374

14 Conclusions: What Does the Future Hold for Education? 403

Index 406

“Overall, I share the authors’ underlying belief that psychology has something useful to contribute to improving education, and I applaud their efforts to demonstrate how to take an evidence-based approach to practical issues in education.”  (PsycCRITIQUES, 17 November 2014)