Skip to main content

Emotion-Oriented Systems

Emotion-Oriented Systems

Catherine Pelachaud

ISBN: 978-1-848-21258-9

Dec 2011, Wiley-ISTE

352 pages

In Stock

$185.00

Description

The Affective Computing domain, term coined by Rosalind Picard in 1997, gathers several scientific areas such as computer science, cognitive science, psychology, design and art. The humane-machine interaction systems are no longer solely fast and efficient. They aim to offer to users affective experiences: user’s affective state is detected and considered within the interaction; the system displays affective state; it can reason about their implication to achieve a task or resolve a problem. In this book, we have chosen to cover various domains of research in emotion-oriented systems. Our aim is also to highlight the importance to base the computational model on theoretical foundations and on natural data.

Preface xiii

PART 1: FOUNDATIONS 1

Chapter 1. Contemporary Theories and Concepts in the Psychology of Emotions 3
Géraldine COPPIN and David SANDER

1.1. Introduction 3

1.2. Emergence of a scientific approach to emotions 4

1.3. Basic emotions theories 7

1.4. Bi-dimensional theories of emotion 11

1.5. Appraisal theories of emotions 14

1.6. Conclusion 19

1.7. Glossary 20

1.8. Bibliography 21

Chapter 2. Emotion and the Brain 33
Andy CHRISTEN and Didier GRANDJEAN

2.1. Introduction 33

2.2. The major role of affective neuroscience in understanding emotions 35

2.3. The historical and conceptual legacy of early conceptions of emotions and the brain 40

2.4. Initial neuro-anatomical emotion theories 41

2.5. Structures in the brain and their functions in emotional processes 44

2.6. The prefrontal cortex 53

2.7. The anterior cingulate cortex 58

2.8. The role of the insula in disgust 58

2.9. Temporal dynamic of brain processes in emotional genesis 59

2.10. Functional connectivity 60

2.11. Conclusion 63

2.12. Bibliography 64

PART 2: NON-VERBAL BEHAVIOR 77

Chapter 3. Emotional Corpora: from Acquisition to Modeling 79
Laurence DEVILLERS and Jean-Claude MARTIN

3.1. Introduction 79

3.2. Building corpora: “acted”, “induced” and real-life emotions 81

3.3. Current emotional corpora 86

3.4. Coding schemes 86

3.5. Complex emotions in spontaneous data 93

3.6. Applications for corpora 97

3.7. Conclusion 100

3.8. Bibliography 101

Chapter 4. Visual Emotion Recognition: Status and Key Issues 107
Alice CAPLIER

4.1. Introduction 107

4.2. What is a facial expression? 109

4.3. Overview of facial expression recognition methods 112

4.4. Spontaneous facial expressions 118

4.5. Expression intensity 124

4.6. Dynamic analysis 126

4.7. Multimodality 128

4.8. Conclusion 131

4.9. Bibliography 132

Chapter 5. Recognition of Acoustic Emotion 139
Chloé CLAVEL and Gaël RICHARD

5.1. Introduction 139

5.2. Principles of automatic emotion-recognition systems 140

5.3. Acoustic descriptors 141

5.4. Automatic emotion classification 151

5.5. Performance and assessment 157

5.6. Conclusion 161

5.7. Bibliography 163

Chapter 6. Modeling Facial Expressions of Emotions 169
Sylwia Julia HYNIEWSKA, Rados³aw NIEWIADOMSKI and Catherine PELACHAUD

6.1. Expressive conversational agents 169

6.2. Expressions and their emotional states 170

6.3. Computational models for facial expressions of emotions 174

6.4. Conclusion 183

6.5. Acknowledgements 184

6.6. Bibliography 184

Chapter 7. Emotion Perception and Recognition 191
Ioana VASILESCU

7.1. Introduction 191

7.2. Perception in vocal communication of emotion 193

7.3. Experimental paradigms and emotion-oriented automatic systems 194

7.4. Conclusion 208

7.5. Bibliography 209

PART 3: FUNCTIONS 215

Chapter 8. The Role of Emotions in Human−Machine Interaction 217
Valérie MAFFIOLO and Magalie OCHS

8.1. Introduction 217

8.2. Interactive information and assistance systems 219

8.3. Video games 227

8.4. Intelligent tutoring systems (ITS)235

8.5. Discussion and research perspectives 237

8.6. Bibliography 238

Chapter 9. Music and Emotions 247
Donald GLOWINSKI and Antonio CAMURRI

9.1. The growing importance of music in society 247

9.2. Recognizing emotions and structural characteristics in music 249

9.3. Rules for modeling musical expression of emotions 251

9.4. Towards a continuous measure of emotional reactions to music 252

9.5. Multimodality in musical experience 253

9.6. Multimodal emotional synthesis in a musical context 260

9.7. The social active listening paradigm: the collective aspect of emotion 262

9.8. Conclusion and perspectives 263

9.9. Bibliography 263

Chapter 10. Literary Feelings in Interactive Fiction 271
Marc CAVAZZA and David PIZZI

10.1. Introduction: emotions and feelings 271

10.2. French novels and the representation of feelings 273

10.3. Madame Bovary: plot and scenes 275

10.4. Interactive fiction and emotional planning 280

10.5. Linguistic interaction and emotions 284

10.6. Emma Bovary’s virtuality 290

10.7. Conclusion 294

10.8. Bibliography 295

Chapter 11. The Design of Emotions: How the Digital is Making Us More Emotional 299
Annie GENTÈS

11.1. Representing, interpreting and evoking emotions 299

11.2. Emotion, mimicry and technical devices 301

11.3. Devices as an alternate source of emotion: photography 301

11.4. Art and computers: formal beginnings 303

11.5. The human behind the mechanics and the mechanics behind the human 305

11.6. Mirror interaction as an emotional vehicle 307

11.7. Trompe l’oeil versus explicit expression 309

11.8. Three-dimensional universes: an empathetic experience 311

11.9. Empathy and identifying emotions 315

11.10. Making human−machine interaction and dialog effective 317

11.11. Conclusion: “revenge of the emotions”318

11.12. Bibliography 318

List of Authors 321

Index 325