Skip to main content

Engineering Project Management, 3rd Edition

Paperback

$89.50

Engineering Project Management, 3rd Edition

Nigel J. Smith

ISBN: 978-1-405-16802-1 December 2007 Wiley-Blackwell 400 Pages

Description

Engineering Project Management provides a clear description of the aims of project management, based on best practice, and discusses the theory and practice in relation to multi-disciplinary engineering projects, both large and small, in the UK and overseas.

 

The Third Edition takes account of the increase in joint ventures, project partnering, special project vehicles and other forms of collaborative working. The text has been extended to give more information on procurement, stakeholders and collaborative provision.

 

For the first time this book now contains a chapter on the UK PRINCE2® project management methodology providing a unique insight into this increasingly popular approach.

 

The expertise of the authors gained from their promotion of effective project management through a combination of professional experience, research, consultancy, education and training should be beneficial to both students of project management and recently appointed or practising project managers. The material is appropriate to support Masters level teaching, MSc, MBA and MEng, either by universities or others, action or distance learning courses and self learning programmes.

 

Also of interest

 

Managing Risk in Construction Projects

Second Edition

Nigel J Smith, Tony Merna & Paul Jobling

978 14051 3012 7

 

Strategic Issues in Public-Private Partnerships

Mirjam Bult-Spiering & Geert Dewulf

978 14051 3475 0

 

 

Cover illustrations courtesy of Getty Images

 

Cover design by Andy Meaden

CHAPTER 1 PROJECTS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENTCHAPTER 1 PROJECTS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT.

1.1 The Function of Project Management.

1.2 Projects.

1.3 Project Management.

1.4 Project Initiation.

1.5 Project Risks.

1.6 Project Objectives.

1.7 Project Success.

CHAPTER 2 VALUE MANAGEMENT.

2.1 Introduction2.2 Definitions.

2.3 Why and When to Apply VM.

2.4 How to Apply VM.

2.5 Reviews.

2.6 Procedures and Techniques.

2.7 Benefits of Value Management.

2.8 Summary.

CHAPTER 3 CASH FLOW, PROJECT APPRAISAL AND RISK MANAGEMENT.

3.1 Cash Flow.

3.2 Categories of Charge.

3.3 Compiling the Base-case Cash Flow.

3.4 Project Cash Flow.

3.5 Profitability Indicator.

3.6 Inflation.

3.7 Initiation.

3.8 Sanction.

3.9 Project Appraisal and Selection.

3.10 Project Evaluation.

3.11 Engineering Risk.

3.12 Risk Management.

3.13 Risk and Uncertainty Management.

CHAPTER 4 QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN PROJECTS4.1 History of Quality Management.

4.2 Definitions:4.3 Quality Planning.

4.4 Quality Management4.5 Total Quality Management (TQM).

4.6 Quality Management Systems.

4.7 Quality Manual.

4.8 International Standards for Quality.

4.9 Implementing a Project Quality System4.10 Types of Quality Related Costs.

4.11 Introducing a Quality Cost System:4.12 Example of a Typical Quality and Production Format.

4.13 Improving Project Quality4.14 Integrating Quality into common Business Practices 4.15 Summary.

CHAPTER 5 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT.

5.1 Environmental Impact.

5.2 Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).

5.3 Screening.

5.4 Environmental Legislation.

5.5 Scoping.

5.6 Base Line Study.

5.7 Impact Prediction.

5.8 Environmental Impact Statement.

5.9 Presenting EIA Information5.10 Monitoring and Auditing of Environmental Impacts.

5.11 Environmental Economics5.12 Environmental Management.

CHAPTER 6 PROJECT FINANCE.

6.1 Introduction.

6.2 Definition of Project Finance.

6.3 Basic Features of Project Finance.

6.4 Short Term Financing Instruments.

6.5 Project Finance in Bundled or Portfolios of Projects.

6.6 Risks.

6.7 Financial Engineering.

6.8 Refinancing and Restructuring.

6.9 Summary.

CHAPTER 7 COST ESTIMATING IN CONTRACTS AND PROJECTS.

7.1 Cost Estimating.

7.2 Cost and Price.

7.3 Importance of the Early Estimates.

7.4 Estimating Techniques.

7.5 Suitability of Estimating Techniques to Project Stages.

7.6 Estimating for Process Plants.

7.7 Information Technology in Estimating.

7.8 Realism of Estimates.

CHAPTER 8 PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT.

8.1 Strategic Management, Managing Change and Programme Management.

8.2 Basics of Programme Management.

8.3 Defining Programme Management, Its Nature and Scope.

8.4 Project Ranking within a Programme.

8.5 Summary.

CHAPTER 9 PLANNING.

9.1 Planning.

9.2 Programming.

9.3 Network Analysis.

9.4 Updating the Network.

9.5 Resource Scheduling.

9.6 Planning with Uncertainty.

9.7 ICT for Project Planning.

9.8 The Planner and Project Teams.

CHAPTER 10 PROJECT CONTROL USING EARNED VALUE TECHNIQUES 10.1 Project Control 10.2 Earned Value Definitions.

10.3 The Theory and Development of Earned Value Analysis.

10.4 Relationship of Project Functions and Earned Value.

10.5 Value of Work Done Control.

10.6 Earned Value Analysis Techniques.

10.7 Application of EVA.

10.8 Examples of EVA.

10.9 Summary.

CHAPTER 11 CONTRACT STRATEGY AND THE CONTRACTOR SELECTION PROCESS.

11.1 Context.

11.2 Factors Affecting Strategy.

11.3 Contractual Considerations.

11.4 Contractor Choice.

11.5 Project Objectives.

11.6 Contract Selection.

11.7 Project Organisation.

11.8 Risk Allocation.

11.9 Terms of Payment.

11.10 Model or Standard Conditions of Contract.

11.11 Sub-Contracts.

CHAPTER 12 CONTRACT POLICY AND DOCUMENTS.

12.1 Tendering Procedures.

12.2 Contracting Policy.

12.3 Contract Planning.

12.4 Contractor Pre-Qualification.

12.5 Contract Documents.

12.6 Tender Review.

12.7 Tender Evaluation.

12.8 Typical Promoter Procedure.

CHAPTER 13 PROJECT DESIGN AND STRUCTURE.

13.1 Organisations.

13.2 Building Blocks of Organisations.

13.3 The Project as a Temporary Organisation.

13.4 Organisation Types.

13.5 The Matrix.

13.6 Networks.

13.7 Virtual Organisations.

13.8 Multiple Projects.

13.9 The Human Side of Structure.

13.10 Project Teams and Empowerment.

13.11 Structure in Collaborative Relationships.

13.12 Summary.

CHAPTER 14 DESIGN MANAGEMENT.

14.1 Introduction.

14.2 Understanding Design.

14.3 What Design Has To Do.

14.4 The Role of Design Management.

14.5 Managing the Project Triple Constraints.

14.6 Design Liability.

14.7 Briefing.

14.8 Interface Control.

14.9 Design for Manufacturing.

CHAPTER 15 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT.

15.1 Introduction.

15.2 Perspectives on Terminology.

15.3 Supply Chain Strategy.

15.4 The Nature of the Organisation.

15.5 The World Class Organisation in Manufacturing.

15.6 The Project Value Chain.

15.7 Procurement and the Project Value Chain.

15.8 Prime Contracting.

15.9 The Operation of Future Construction Supply Chains.

15.10 Summary.

CHAPTER 16 PARTNERING.

16.1 Teamworking.

16.2 Supply Chain Integration.

16.3 Relational Contracting.

16.4 Partnering.

16.5 Forms of Partnering.

16.6 Establishing the Relationship.

16.7 Making the Relationship Work.

16.8 The Benefits of Partnering.

16.9 The Limitations of Partnering.

16.10 Summary.

CHAPTER 17 PRIVATE FINANCE INITIATIVE AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP.

17.1 Concession Contracts.

17.2 Definition of BOOT Projects.

17.3 Organisational and Contractual Structure.

17.4 Concession Agreements.

17.5 Procurement of BOOT Project Strategies.

17.6 Concession Periods.

17.7 Existing Facilities.

17.8 Classification of BOOT Projects.

17.9 Projects Suitable for BOOT Strategies.

17.10 Risks Fundamental to BOOT Projects.

17.11 BOOT Package Structure.

17.12 Advantages and Disadvantages of BOOT Projects.

17.13 The Origins of PFI.

17.14 The Arguments for Privately Financed Public Services.

17.15 PFI in the UK17.16 Bidding and Competition 17.17 Output Specification.

17.18 Financing Public Private Partnerships.

CHAPTER 18 PROJECT STAKEHOLDERS.

18.1 Stakeholders.

18.2 Stakeholder Identification.

18.3 The Client.

18.4 Contractors.

18.5 Financiers.

18.6 Government.

18.7 Community.

18.8 Interest groups.

18.9 Summary.

CHAPTER 19 PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.

19.1 What Makes Developing Countries Different?.

19.2 The Construction Industry in Developing Countries.

19.3 Finance and Funding.

19.4 Appropriate Technology.

19.5 Labour Intensive Construction.

19.6 Community Participation.

19.7 Technology Transfer19.8 Corruption.

19.9 The Future.

CHAPTER 20 PROJECTS IN CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENTS 2: PRINCE2.

20.1 Introduction.

20.2 Benefits and Limitations.

20.3 Project Management Standards and Methodologies.

20.4 Structure and Contents.

20.4.1 Components.

20.4.2 Processes.

20.4.3 Techniques.

20.5 Structured Walkthrough.

20.5.1 Planning Work.

20.5.2 Doing Work.

20.6 Summary.

CHAPTER 21 THE FUTURE FOR ENGINEERING PROJECT MANAGEMENT.

21.1 Key Roles in Project Management.

21.2 Guidelines for Project Management.

21.3 Project Management - The Way Ahead

"For any engineer, student, or institute with an interest in project management this book will be one of the books on their desk." Professor Ronald McCaffer<!--end-->

'Comprehensive, well written and thoroughly well researched - a must for all those involved in the field' Building Engineer

● Discusses both the theory and practice of project management for multi-disciplinary engineering projects
● Deals with projects, both large and small, on an international basis
● Features new material on value management, risk, multi-project management and framework agreements
● For both students and newly qualified practising project managers