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Equine MRI

Rachel C. Murray (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-444-32920-9

Nov 2010, Wiley-Blackwell

608 pages

$150.99

Description

Equine MRI is a unique, comprehensive guide to MRI in the horse. Edited by Rachel Murray, a leading authority and researcher in the field with over ten years of equine clinical MRI experience, the book also includes contributions from worldwide experts in the subject.

Divided into the following four sections, the book presents key information based on previous validation work and clinical practice:

  • Principles of MRI, including the practicalities of image acquisition and interpretation
  • Normal MRI anatomy and normal variations
  • Different types of pathological change
  • Options for clinical management and prognosis for different conditions

MRI is a rapidly expanding area in veterinary medicine that confers detailed, three-dimensional information on both bone and soft tissue. Expanding clinical knowledge, improvements in technology, and practical application of MRI to the standing and recumbent horse means this useful imaging modality has become an integral and essential part of the diagnostic evaluation in lameness and is a realistic option for investigation of ophthalmological, neurological and cranial pathology.

Equine MRI enables readers to understand the best ways to achieve good quality images, and provides a detailed explanation of the problems that may occur.

With close to 950 normal and abnormal images, this book offers considerable detail and examples of both common and uncommon problems, making it a great reference for equine veterinarians, veterinary students, specialists in equine surgery, and specialists in veterinary imaging.

CONTRIBUTORS.

FOREWORD.

PREFACE.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.

SECTION A Principles of MRI in horses.

1 BASIC MRI PRINCIPLES (Nick Bolas).

2 HIGH-FIELD MRI IN HORSES: PRACTICALITIES AND IMAGE ACQUISITION.

2A Practicalities and image acquisition (Rachel Murray).

2B General anaesthesia for MRI (Elizabeth Leece).

2C Contrast agents in equine MRI (Carter Judy).

3 LOW-FIELD MRI IN HORSES: PRACTICALITIES AND IMAGE ACQUISITION (Natasha Werpy).

4 IMAGE INTERPRETATION AND ARTEFACTS (Rachel Murray and Natasha Werpy).

SECTION B Normal MRI Anatomy.

5 THE FOOT AND PASTERN.

5A Adult horse (Sue Dyson).

5B Foal anatomical development (Bert Van Thielen and Rachel Murray).

6 THE FETLOCK REGION (Merry Smith and Sue Dyson0.

7 THE METACARPAL/METATARSAL REGION (Matthew Brokken and Russell Tucker).

8 THE CARPUS (Annamaria Nagy and Sue Dyson0.

9 THE TARSUS (Sue Dyson and Rachel Murray).

10 THE STIFLE (Rachel Murray, Natasha Werpy and Simon Collins).

11 THE HEAD (Russell Tucker and Shannon Holmes).

SECTION C Pathology.

12 THE FOOT AND PASTERN (Sue Dyson and Rachel Murray).

13 THE FETLOCK REGION (Sarah Powell).

14 THE METACARPAL/METATARSAL REGION (Matthew Brokken, Russell Tucker and Rachel Murray).

15 THE CARPAL REGION (Sarah Powell and Rachel Murray).

16 THE DISTAL TARSAL REGION (Sue Dyson).

17 THE PROXIMAL TARSAL REGION (Rachel Murray, Natasha Werpy, Fabrice Audigié, Jean-Marie Denoi, Matthew Brokken and Thorben Schulze).

18 THE STIFLE (Carter Judy).

19 THE HEAD (Russell Tucker, Katherine Garrett, Stephen Reed and Rachel Murray).

SECTION D Clinical management and outcome.

20 THE FOOT AND PASTERN (Andrew Bathe).

21 THE FETLOCK REGION.

21A General (Sue Dyson).

21B Thoroughbred racehorses (Sarah Powell).

22 THE METACARPAL/METATARSAL REGION.

22A US perspective (Matthew Brokken and Russell Tucker).

22B UK perspective (Sue Dyson).

22C Thoroughbred racehorses (Sarah Powell).

23 THE CARPUS.

23A Osseous injury (Sarah Powell).

23B Soft tissue injury (Rachel Murray).

24 THE TARSUS (Tim Mair and Ceri Sherlock).

25 THE HEAD (Russell Tucker, Katherine Garrett, Stephen Reed and Rachel Murray).

INDEX.

“The authors are to be congratulated on an excellent job and this text, like those dedicated to other imaging modalities, will be required reading for equine veterinarians working with lame horses. Equine MRI is recommended for specialist radiologists and equine clinicians already using MRI, but because of the way it
has been written, students, residents and general practitioners working with lame horses would also be interested in this book.”  (Australian Veterinary Journal, 28 January 2013)

""It is also aimed at clinicians who spend much of their time investigating and treating lame horses. For these audiences, this well written, beautifully illustrated and thoroughly referenced text is a must."" (Veterinary Record, 28 January 2012)

""This is a high quality work and an excellent reference for veterinarians wishing to learn about this new and exciting field."" (Doody's, 7 October 2011)

""This book gives an excellent account of MRI as a powerful tool in the understanding of equine anatomy, physiology and pathology. Clinicians and researchers both now and in the future will be grateful to Rachel Murray for all the contributions for bringing together their experience and producing it in such a coherent way."" (Veterinary Practice, 1 August 2011)

""This book is written in a generally very readable and logical format and, as such, is extremely useful to equine clinicians referring cases for MRI as well as those opearting MR systems and interpreting scans."" (Veterinary Times, 28 March 2011)

  • A unique, comprehensive guide that proves a useful diagnostic tool in this rapidly expanding area of veterinary medicine

  • Written by worldwide experts in the subject

  • Covers the principles of MRI, normal MRI anatomy, pathology, and clinical management and outcome

  • Contains close to 950 normal and abnormal images