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Focus in Hausa

Focus in Hausa

Melanie Green

ISBN: 978-1-405-15626-4

Mar 2007, Wiley-Blackwell

312 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$41.95

Description

This book investigates the morphosyntax, semantics and discourse properties of focus and wh-constructions in Hausa, and introduces readers to aspects of the syntax of a major world language unfamiliar to most linguists.

  • Represents the first detailed and comprehensive exposition of focus related constructions in Hausa from the perspective of a major contemporary theoretical framework
  • Explores aspects of the syntax of focus in Hausa which have only recently begun to be described
  • Authoritative and up-to-date, detailing recent developments in the theory, and reviewing and evaluating a number of current approaches to the syntax of focus constructions and non-verbal copular clauses
  • Contains comparative data from related Chadic/Afroasiatic languages
  • Serves to introduce readers to aspects of the syntax of a major world language unfamiliar to most linguists.
Preface.

Acknowledgements.

List of tables.

Abbreviations, symbols and transcription.

1 Introduction.

1.1 Aims and overview.

1.2 The data.

2 The Hausa language.

2.1 Introduction.

2.2 Hausa linguistics.

2.3 Main linguistic features.

2.3.1 Phonology.

2.3.2 Word order and the verbal-inflectional complex.

2.3.3 Non-verbal clauses.

2.3.4 The noun phrase.

2.3.5 Null subjects and objects.

2.3.6 Modal/adverbial particles.

2.4 Wh-type constructions.

2.4.1 Relative clauses.

2.4.2 Wh-questions.

2.4.3 Focus constructions.

3 Focus in generative grammar.

3.1 Introduction.

3.2 The generative framework.

3.2.1 Philosophical assumptions.

3.2.2 The transformational model.

3.2.3 X-bar syntax.

3.2.4 The Minimalist Program: Merge, Move and Agree.

3.3 What is focus?.

3.3.1 Semantics and pragmatics.

3.3.2 Structural features and typology.

3.4 Generative theories of focus.

3.4.1 Syntax-based theories.

3.4.2 Prosody-based theories.

3.4.3 Model of focus assumed in the present study.

4 Focus constructions.

4.1 Introduction.

4.2 Focus fronting: descriptive facts.

4.2.1 Focus fronting.

4.2.2 Focus versus topic.

4.2.3 Focus fronting versus clefting.

4.3 Focus fronting: the FP analysis.

4.3.1 Proposal.

4.3.2 Empirical evidence.

4.3.3 Theoretical issues.

4.4 Wh-fronting.

4.5 Special inflection.

4.5.1 Special inflection in Hausa: descriptive facts.

4.5.2 Special inflection in Hausa: theoretical issues.

4.6 Focus/wh-in situ.

4.6.1 Wh-in situ: descriptive facts.

4.6.2 Focus in situ: descriptive facts.

4.6.3 Exploring a form–function correlation.

4.6.4 Multiple focus/wh-constructions.

4.6.5 Extending the FP analysis.

4.7 Conclusions.

5 Copular constructions.

5.1 Introduction.

5.2 Non-verbal copular sentences: the data.

5.2.1 Morphosyntactic features.

5.2.2 Specification and predication: descriptive terminology.

5.2.3 Predicational copular sentences in Hausa.

5.2.4 Specificational/equative copular sentences in Hausa.

5.3 The evolution of né/cé.

5.4 Extending the FP analysis.

5.4.1 Proposal.

5.4.2 Empirical evidence.

5.4.3 Theoretical issues.

5.4.4 Summary.

5.5 Conclusions.

6 A cross-linguistic perspective.

6.1 Introduction.

6.2 Focus constructions.

6.2.1 Chadic.

6.2.2 Arabic.

6.2.3 Hebrew.

6.2.4 Coptic Egyptian.

6.2.5 Summary.

6.3 Copular/non-verbal clauses.

6.3.1 Typology of copular sentences.

6.3.2 Chadic.

6.3.3 Arabic.

6.3.4 Hebrew.

6.3.5 Coptic Egyptian.

6.3.6 Summary.

6.4. Conclusions.

7 Summary and conclusions.

References.

Indexes


  • Represents the first detailed and comprehensive exposition of focus related constructions in Hausa from the perspective of a major contemporary theoretical framework
  • Explores aspects of the syntax of focus in Hausa which have only recently begun to be described
  • Authoritative and up-to-date, detailing recent developments in the theory, and reviewing and evaluating a number of current approaches to the syntax of focus constructions and non-verbal copular clauses
  • Contains comparative data from related Chadic/Afroasiatic languages
  • Serves to introduce readers to aspects of the syntax of a major world language unfamiliar to most linguists