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From Naming to Saying: The Unity of the Proposition

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From Naming to Saying: The Unity of the Proposition

Martha I. Gibson

ISBN: 978-1-405-14310-3 April 2008 Wiley-Blackwell 240 Pages

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Description

From Naming to Saying explores the classicquestion of the unity of the proposition, combining an historical approach with contemporary causal theories to offer a unique and novel solution.

  • Presents compelling and sophisticated answers to questions about how language represents the world.
  • Defends a novel approach to the classical question about the unity of the proposition.
  • Examines three key historical theories: Frege’s doctrine of concept and object, Russell’s analysis of the sentence, and Wittgenstein’s picture theory of meaning.
  • Combines an historical approach with discussion and defense of a contemporary causal theory of the unity of the proposition.
  • Establishes a view compatible with, though not dependent on, a causal theory of meaning.
Preface.

edgements.

Part I: Classical Theories of The Unity of The Proposition.

1. Frege’s Account Of The Unity Of The Sentence.

2. Russell On The Analysis Of The Sentence.

3. Wittgenstein’s Picture Theory Of The Unity Of The Proposition.

Part II: Subjects And Predicates And Their Logical And Metaphysical Correlates.

4. The Metaphysical Basis Of The Subject / Predicate Distinction.

5. Negation, Propositional Combination And The Nature Of Concepts.

6. Can A Unified Theory Of Predication Be Given?.

Part III: A Pragmatic Account of The Unity of The Sentence.

7. The Causal Asymmetry Between Subject And Predicate And The Unity Of The Sentence.

8. Limitations, Applications, And Externalist Theories Of Meaning.

Bibliography.

Index

"A deep and philosophically satisfying answer to the question of how we manage to say something by stringing words together. Gibson's historically sensitive treatment will rekindle interest in this classic problem." Fred Dretske, Duke University

  • Presents compelling and sophisticated answers to questions about how language represents the world.
  • Defends a novel approach to the classical question about the unity of the proposition.
  • Examines three key historical theories: Frege’s doctrine of concept and object, Russell’s analysis of the sentence, and Wittgenstein’s picture theory of meaning.
  • Combines an historical approach with discussion and defense of a contemporary causal theory of the unity of the proposition.
  • Establishes a view compatible with, though not dependent on, a causal theory of meaning.