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Global Institutions and Responsibilities: Achieving Global Justice

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Global Institutions and Responsibilities: Achieving Global Justice

Christian Barry (Editor), Thomas W. Pogge (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-13010-3 February 2006 Wiley-Blackwell 360 Pages

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Description

This book helps readers identify feasible and morally plausible reforms of global institutional arrangements and international organizations.
  • A distinctive, practically oriented contribution to debates about global justice.
  • Helps readers to examine the fairness of global rules and institutions.
  • Integrates philosophical thinking about normative responsibility with discussion of practical dilemmas concerning organizations such as the WTO, and rules governing the use of force internationally.
  • Brings together original articles by political philosophers, legal theorists, and economists.
  • Considers the aims of global justice, the institutional arrangements that are required to realise them, and the allocation of responsibilities to promote the required institutional reforms.
Notes on Contributors.

1 Introduction: Christian Barry and Thomas W. Pogge.

Part 1: Aims.

2 Global Justice Without End?: John Tasioulas.

3 Assessing Global Poverty and Inequality: Income, Resources, and Capabilities: Ingrid Robeyns.

4 Boundary Making and Equal Concern: Kok-Chor Tan.

5 Theorizing International Fairness: Nancy Kokaz.

Part 2: Arrangements.

6 Three (Potential) Pillars of Transnational Economic Justice: The Bretton Woods Institutions as Guarantors of Global Equal Treatment and Market Completion: Robert Hockett.

7 Network Power and Global Standardization: The Controversy over the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: David Singh Grewal.

8 The World Trade Organization and Egalitarian Justice: Darrel Moellendorf.

9 Whose Sovereignty?: Empire Versus International Law: Jean L. Cohen.

10 Human Rights and Global Health: A Research Program: Thomas W. Pogge.

11 Just International Monetary Arrangements: Sanjay G. Reddy.

12 The Ownership Model of Business Ethics: David Rodin.

13 The Preventive Use of Force: A Cosmopolitan Institutional Proposal: Allen Buchanan and Robert O. Keohane.

Part 3: Responsibilities.

14 Applying the Contribution Principle: Christian Barry.

15 Global Justice and the Logic of the Burden of Proof: Juha Ra¨ Ikka¨.

16 Extreme Poverty and Global Responsibility: Bashshar Haydar.

17 The New Liberal Imperialism: Assessing the Arguments: Jedediah Purdy.

Index


  • A distinctive, practically oriented contribution to debates about global justice.
  • Helps readers to examine the fairness of global rules and institutions.
  • Integrates philosophical thinking about normative responsibility with discussion of practical dilemmas concerning organizations such as the WTO, and rules governing the use of force internationally.
  • Brings together original articles by political philosophers, legal theorists, and economists.
  • Considers the aims of global justice, the institutional arrangements that are required to realise them, and the allocation of responsibilities to promote the required institutional reforms.