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Grounding Globalization: Labour in the Age of Insecurity

Grounding Globalization: Labour in the Age of Insecurity

Edward Webster, Rob Lambert, Andries Beziudenhout

ISBN: 978-1-444-39984-4

Aug 2011, Wiley-Blackwell

280 pages

$33.99

Description

*Winner of the 2009 Distinguished Scholarly Monograph Prize, awarded by the American Sociological Association Labor and Labor Movements section*

Claims have been made on the emergence of a new labour internationalism in response to the growing insecurity created by globalization. However, when persons face conditions of insecurity they often turn inwards. The book contains a warning and a sign of hope. Some workers become fatalistic, even xenophobic. Others are attempting to globalize their own struggles.

  • Examines the claim that a new labour internationalism is emerging by grounding the book in evidence, rather than assertion
  • Analyzes three distinct places – Orange, Australia; Changwon, South Korea; and Ezakheni, South Africa – and how they dealt with manufacturing plants undergoing restructuring
  • Explores worker responses to rising levels of insecurity and examines preconditions for the emergence of counter-movements to such insecurities Highlights the significance of 'place' and 'scale', and demonstrates how the restructuring of multi-national corporations, and worker responses to this, connect the two concepts
Preface: A Journey of Discovery.

List of Abbreviations.

1. The Polanyi Problem and the Problem with Polanyi.

Part One: Markets Against Society.

2. Manufacturing Matters.

3. The Return of Market Despotism.

4. Citizenship Matters.

Part Two: Society Against Markets.

5. Strong Winds in Ezakheni.

6. Escaping Social Death in Changwon.

7. Squeezing Orange.

Part Three: Society Governing the Market?

8. History Matters.

9. Grounding Labour Internationalism.

10. The Necessity for Utopian Thinking.

Notes.

References.

Index.

“Grounding Globalization is a magnificent culmination of work the authors have done previously on South Africa and SIGTUR in particular. It is most certainly ‘grounded’ in the working lives of real people. It is robust and critical social research at its best. Labour analysts and activists will undoubtedly be reading it carefully for years to come.” (Globalizations, February 2009)

  • Examines the claim that a new labour internationalism is emerging by grounding the book in evidence, rather than assertion
  • Analyzes three distinct places –Orange, Australia; Changwon, South Korea; and Ezakheni, South Africa – and how they dealt with manufacturing plants undergoing restructuring
  • Explores worker responses to rising levels of insecurity and examines preconditions for the emergence of counter-movements to such insecurity
  • Grounds globalization in the everyday lives of workers, their households and their communities
  • Highlights the significance of ‘place’ and ‘scale’, and demonstrates how the restructuring of multi-national corporations, and worker responses to this, connect the two concepts