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Handbook of Biomedical Telemetry

Hardcover

$161.25

Handbook of Biomedical Telemetry

Konstantina S. Nikita (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-118-38861-7 August 2014 Wiley-IEEE Press 736 Pages

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Description

A must-have compendium on biomedical telemetry for all biomedical professional engineers, researchers, and graduate students in the field

Handbook of Biomedical Telemetry describes the main components of a typical biomedical telemetry system, as well as its technical challenges. Written by a diverse group of experts in the field, it is filled with overviews, highly-detailed scientific analyses, and example applications of biomedical telemetry. The book also addresses technologies for biomedical sensing and design of biomedical telemetry devices with special emphasis on powering/integration issues and materials for biomedical telemetry applications.

Handbook of Biomedical Telemetry:

  • Describes the main components of a typical biomedical telemetry system, along with the technical challenges
  • Discusses issues of spectrum regulations, standards, and interoperability—while major technical challenges related to advanced materials, miniaturization, and biocompatibility issues are also included
  • Covers body area electromagnetics, inductive coupling, antennas for biomedical telemetry, intra-body communications, non-RF communication links for biomedical telemetry (optical biotelemetry), as well as safety issues, human phantoms, and exposure assessment to high-frequency biotelemetry fields
  • Presents biosensor network topologies and standards; context-aware sensing and multi-sensor fusion; security and privacy issues in biomedical telemetry; and the connection between biomedical telemetry and telemedicine
  • Introduces clinical applications of Body Sensor Networks (BSNs) in addition to selected examples of wearable, implantable, ingestible devices, stimulator and integrated mobile healthcare system paradigms for monitoring and therapeutic intervention

Covering biomedical telemetry devices, biosensor network topologies and standards, clinical applications, wearable and implantable devices, and the effects on the mobile healthcare system, this compendium is a must-have for professional engineers, researchers, and graduate students.

Preface xxi

Acknowledgments xxiii

Contributors xxv

1 Introduction to Biomedical Telemetry 1
Konstantina S. Nikita

1.1 What is Biomedical Telemetry? 1

1.2 Significance of Area 3

1.3 Typical Biomedical Telemetry System 4

1.4 Challenges in Biomedical Telemetry 5

1.5 Commercial Medical Telemetry Devices 14

1.6 Overview of Book 19

References 23

Part I Biomedical Telemetry Devices 27

2 Design Considerations of Biomedical Telemetry Devices 29
Dominik Cirmirakis and Andreas Demosthenous

2.1 Introduction 29

2.2 Energy Transfer Types 30

2.3 Architecture of Inductively Coupled Biomedical Telemetry Devices 31

2.4 Data Transmission Methods 39

2.5 Safety Issues 44

2.6 Conclusion 51

References 51

3 Sensing Principles for Biomedical Telemetry 56
Athanasios Lioumpas, Georgia Ntouni, and Konstantina S. Nikita

3.1 Introduction 56

3.2 Biosensor Structure 57

3.3 Electrochemical Biosensors 59

3.4 Optical Biosensors 63

3.5 Thermal/Calorimetric Biosensors 67

3.6 Piezoelectric Biosensors 69

3.7 Other Types of Biosensors 71

3.8 Conclusions 72

References 73

4 Sensing Technologies for Biomedical Telemetry 76
Toshiyo Tamura

4.1 Introduction 76

4.2 Noninvasive Sensors and Interfaces 77

4.3 Invasive and Implantable Sensors 92

4.4 Conclusion 101

References 101

5 Power Issues in Biomedical Telemetry 108
Manos M. Tentzeris, Rushi Vyas, Wei Wei, Yoshihiro Kawahara, Li Yang, Stavros Georgakopoulos, Vasileios Lakafosis, Sangkil Kim, Hoseon Lee, Taoran Le, Sagar Mukala, and Anya Traille

5.1 Introduction and Powering Mechanisms 108

5.2 Motion-Powered Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Wireless Sensors 109

5.3 Noninvasive Wireless Methods for Powering on Sensors 112

5.4 Conclusion 129

References 129

Part II Propagation and Communication Issues for Biomedical Telemetry 131

6 Numerical and Experimental Techniques for Body Area Electromagnetics 133
Asimina Kiourti and Konstantina S. Nikita

6.1 Introduction 133

6.2 Electrical Properties of Human Body Tissues 135

6.3 Numerical Modeling 139

6.4 Physical Modeling 154

6.5 Safety Issues 164

6.6 Conclusion 167

References 168

7 Inductive Coupling 174
Maysam Ghovanloo and Mehdi Kiani

7.1 Introduction 174

7.2 Induction Principles 175

7.3 Wireless Power Transmission 178

7.4 Inductive Coupling for Biomedical Telemetry 186

7.5 Inductive Data Transmission 192

7.6 Broader Applications 201

7.7 Future Research Directions 202

7.8 Conclusion 202

References 203

8 Antennas and RF Communication 209
Asimina Kiourti and Konstantina S. Nikita

8.1 Introduction 209

8.2 Background Information 211

8.3 On-Body Antennas 212

8.4 Implantable Antennas 223

8.5 Ingestible Antennas 235

8.6 Conclusion and Future Research Directions 245

References 246

9 Intrabody Communication 252
Laura M. Roa, Javier Reina-Tosina, Amparo Callejón-Leblic, David Naranjo, and Miguel Á. Estudillo-Valderrama

9.1 Introduction 252

9.2 Intrabody Communication Transmission Methods 256

9.3 Dielectric Properties of Human Body 259

9.4 Experimental Characterization of IBC Channel 265

9.5 Introduction to IBC Models 273

9.6 IBC Propagation Channel 282

9.7 Conclusion 292

Acknowledgments 294

References 294

10 Optical Biotelemetry 301
Koichi Shimizu

10.1 Introduction 301

10.2 Optical Technology for Optical Biotelemetry 303

10.3 Communication Technology for Optical Telemetry 306

10.4 Propagation of Optical Signal 309

10.5 Multiplexing in Optical Telemetry 313

10.6 Applications of Optical Telemetry 316

10.7 Conclusion 327

References 328

11 Biosensor Communication Technology and Standards 330
Lars Schmitt, Javier Espina, Thomas Falck, and Dong Wang

11.1 Introduction 330

11.2 Biosensor Application Scenarios 332

11.3 Biosensor Communication Technologies 335

11.4 Conclusion 364

References 365

12 Context-Aware Sensing and Multisensor Fusion 368
Stefan Hey

12.1 Introduction 368

12.2 Context-Aware Sensing 368

12.3 Multisensor Fusion 373

12.4 Example Application: Stress Measurement 378

12.5 Conclusion and Future Research Directions 379

References 379

13 Security and Privacy in Biomedical Telemetry: Mobile Health Platform for Secure Information Exchange 382
Nikolaos Bourbakis, Alexandros Pantelopoulos, and Raghudeep Kannavara

13.1 Introduction 382

13.2 Digital Security 383

13.3 Wearable Health Monitoring Systems (WHMS) Platform 390

13.4 Processing of Physiological Data 394

13.5 Secure Information Exchange 400

13.6 Conclusion and Future Research Directions 414

Acknowledgment 415

References 415

14 Connection Between Biomedical Telemetry and Telemedicine 419
Emmanouil G. Spanakis, Vangelis Sakkalis, Kostas Marias, and Manolis Tsiknakis

14.1 Introduction 419

14.2 Biomedical Instrumentation 420

14.3 Biomedical Telemetry and Telemedicine: Related Work 421

14.4 Theory and Applications of Biomedical Telemetry 423

14.5 Integration of Biomedical Telemetry with Telemedicine 423

14.6 Wireless Communication Protocols and Standards 425

14.7 Cross-Layer Design of Wireless Biomedical Telemetry and Telemedicine Health Networks 425

14.8 Telecommunication Networks in Health Care for Biomedical Telemetry 428

14.9 Future Research Directions and Challenges 437

14.10 Conclusion 440

References 442

15 Safety Issues in Biomedical Telemetry 445
Konstantinos A. Psathas, Asimina Kiourti, and Konstantina S. Nikita

15.1 Introduction 445

15.2 Operational Safety 446

15.3 Product and Device Hazards 450

15.4 Patient and Clinical Safety 454

15.5 Human Factor and Use Issues 458

15.6 Electromagnetic Compatibility and Interference Issues 461

15.7 Applicable Guidelines 464

15.8 Occupational Safety 471

15.9 Future Research Directions 472

15.10 Conclusion 473

References 474

Part III Example Applications of Biomedical Telemetry 479

16 Clinical Applications of Body Sensor Networks 481
Richard M. Kwasnicki and Guang-Zhong Yang

16.1 Introduction 481

16.2 Healthcare Paradigm Shift for Pervasive Sensing 483

16.3 Usage Scenarios 484

16.4 Opportunities and Future Challenges 494

16.5 Conclusion 501

Acknowledgment 502

References 502

17 Wearable Health Care System Paradigm 505
Yang Hao and Robert Foster

17.1 Introduction 505

17.2 Wireless Wearable Technology in Health Care 506

17.3 Methods and Design Approach for Wireless Wearable Systems 509

17.4 Example Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) Applications in Health Care 516

17.5 Conclusion 521

References 521

18 Epidermal Sensor Paradigm: Inner Layer Tissue Monitoring 525
Dimitris Psychoudakis, Chi-Chih Chen, Gil-Young Lee, and John L. Volakis

18.1 Introduction 525

18.2 Review of Electromagnetic Properties of Human Body 526

18.3 Propagation Modes for Body-Centric Wireless Communications 531

18.4 Human Torso Model for Body-Centric Wireless Communication 537

18.5 Two-Layer Model for Internal Organ Monitoring 542

18.6 Epidermal RF Sensor for Inner Layer Tissue Monitoring 542

18.7 Extraction of Dielectric Constant 544

18.8 Conclusion 546

References 547

19 Implantable Health Care System Paradigm 549
Masaharu Takahashi and Koichi Ito

19.1 Introduction 549

19.2 Multilayered Model Simulating Human Body 550

19.3 Cardiac Pacemaker Embedded in Multilayered Models 554

19.4 Implantable Health Care System Paradigm 562

19.5 Conclusion and Future Research Directions 568

References 570

20 Ingestible Health Care System Paradigm for Wireless Capsule Endoscopy 572
Nikolaos Bourbakis and Alexandros Karargyris

20.1 Introduction 572

20.2 WCE and Endoscopic Imaging 576

20.3 Diagnostic Methods and Challenges 585

20.4 Future Directions: Design New Generation of WCE 586

20.5 Conclusion and WCE Global Health Care 591

References 591

21 Stimulator Paradigm: Artificial Retina 593
Carlos J. Cela, Keyoor C. Gosalia, Anil Kumar RamRakhyani, Gianluca Lazzi, Shruthi Soora, Gerard J. Hayes, and Michael D. Dickey

21.1 Introduction 593

21.2 Telemetry for Artificial Retina 594

21.3 Intraocular Telemetry Antennas 595

21.4 Multicoil Telemetry 611

21.5 Future Research Directions: Flexible and Liquid Antennas 618

21.6 Conclusion 620

References 620

22 mHealth-Integrated System Paradigm: Diabetes Management 623
Alessio Fioravanti, Giuseppe Fico, Alejandro González Patón, Jan-Paul Leuteritz, Alejandra Guillén Arredondo, and María Teresa Arredondo Waldmeyer

22.1 Clinical Treatment 623

22.2 Diabetes Treatment through Telemetry 624

22.3 Problems Related to Current Treatments 625

22.4 Assessment: State of the Art 625

22.5 Technological Solution 626

22.6 METABO System 627

22.7 Evaluation Methodology: Data Collection and System Testing 629

22.8 Results 631

22.9 Conclusion 631

Acknowledgments 632

References 632

23 Advanced Material-Based Sensing Structures 633
Manos M. Tentzeris, Sangkil Kim, Vasileios Lakafosis, Hoseon Lee, Taoran Le, Rushi Vyas, Sagar Mukala, and Anya Traille

23.1 Introduction 633

23.2 Human-Body-Wearable Antennas 634

23.3 Carbon-Nanotube-Based Ammonia Detection for Medical Diagnosis 656

23.4 Graphene-Based Ammonia Detection for Medical Diagnosis 670

23.5 Integrated Wireless Modules 679

23.6 Conclusion 685

References 686

Index 691